VIDEO Riding a wave of hope with Ricochet

August 18, 2013
A Really Powerful Message
Riding a wave of hope with Ricochet — An inspirational video of a surf dogs journey

This beautiful story is about what we all want — to be encouraged to discover who we really are… to be accepted… to find our life purpose… and to be celebrated for being different. Each person who watches this video finds an individual message that touches them on many different levels, bringing them to tears. It’s about the power of being YOUnique, staying true to yourself, adjusting expectations, being empowered, overcoming challenges, looking at obstacles as opportunities, transformation, inter-connectedness, authenticity, and that anything is possible if you follow your heart.

Ricochet has connected with millions of people all over the world as she delivers messages of inspiration with no words needed, in a language left unspoken. Please help her paw it forward & share this video with anyone who could use bit of encouragement and inspiration.

Join Ricochet on Facebook! http://www.facebook.com/SurfDogRicochet – or visit her website http://www.SurfDogRicochet.com. This video is copyrighted 2009.

http://joyfullyrenewed.wordpress.com/2013/08/18/a-really-powerful-message/

A Place of Permanence

The LORD will always lead you. ISAIAH 58:11

You’ve been there. You’ve escaped the sandy foundations of the valley and ascended his grand outcropping of granite. You’ve turned your back on the noise and sought his voice. You’ve stepped away from the masses and followed the Master as he led you up the winding path to the summit.…

Gently your guide invites you to sit on the rock above the tree line and look out with him at the ancient peaks that will never erode. “What is necessary is still what is sure,” he confides. “Just remember:

“You’ll go nowhere tomorrow that I haven’t already been.

“Truth will still triumph.…

“The victory is yours.…”

The sacred summit. A place of permanence in a world of transition.

The Applause of Heaven

God’s Condition for Blessing

Romans 12:1-2

If people were really honest, many would say their Christianity barely resembles the faith experience God has promised. They struggle repeatedly with the same sins, complain that God rarely answers prayers, and wonder why He hasn’t given them the desires of their heart. However, most believers never stop to ask, Why doesn’t God favor me?

The answer to that question can revolutionize our life if we are willing to meet God’s one condition for full blessing. We are designed with a capacity to experience the Lord’s best in every area of life, but for that to happen, we must offer ourselves as living sacrifices. In other words, we are to be separated from the world and given to God for His purposes.

Don’t be fooled by cultural views on servants. God doesn’t call the weak into bondage to the strong. In fact, believers are the freest people in the world because we can trust our Father to give us the very best in return for our commitment. His best may not always look appealing from the outset, but experience teaches us that He orchestrates all circumstances to our benefit (Rom. 8:28).

We can never be satisfied with less than the Lord’s best. Avoiding submission will result in wasted years of chasing after His blessing through our own cunning. On the other hand, our hearts are saturated with joy and peace when we draw close to Him. The best way to connect with God is to willingly put ourselves in His hand. Allow Him to reveal what great blessings He can send via your surrendered will.

The Living Word

“And he was clothed with a vesture dipped in blood: and his name is called The Word of God.” (Revelation 19:13)

This uniquely expressive name assigned to Christ, as He returns to Earth in glory, is used also by John in his gospel (John 1:1, 14) and in his epistle (1 John 1:1), referring both to His primeval work of creation and also to His human incarnation. It is well known that “Word” here is the Greek logos. Six times it is applied by John as a name or title of the Son of God (three times in John 1:1), the second person of the Trinity. Actually, John used it seven times, assuming that the disputed verse, 1 John 5:7 (“the Father, the Word, and the Holy Ghost”), is really a part of the inspired text.

The Greek word logos is a remarkable word, adaptable to many meanings. It is translated in the King James New Testament by about 30 other words (“speech,” “saying,” “reason,” etc.). The lexicons add still other meanings, and some of the Greek philosophers used it to describe the intelligence behind the universe.

As used by John, it becomes much more specific: “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God” (John 1:1). The Jehovah’s Witnesses, rejecting the deity of Christ, like to translate this as “the Word was a god,” but all knowledgeable Greek scholars agree that the King James rendering is correct. Then, says John, “the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us . . . full of grace and truth” (John 1:14). Even though “no man hath seen God at any time” (John 1:18), He has become knowable through His Son who has “declared him.” Consequently, John also can declare Him to others. “That which was from the beginning, which we have heard, which we have seen with our eyes . . . and our hands have handled, of the Word of life; . . . That which we have seen and heard declare we unto you, that ye also may have fellowship with us” (1 John 1:1, 3). HMM

As sorrowful, yet always rejoicing

“As sorrowful, yet always rejoicing.” (2 Cor. 6:10.)

SORROW was beautiful, but her beauty was the beauty of the moonlight shining through the leafy branches of the trees in the wood, and making little pools of silver here and there on the soft green moss below.

When Sorrow sang, her notes were like the low sweet call of the nightingale, and in her eyes was the unexpectant gaze of one who has ceased to look for coming gladness. She could weep in tender sympathy with those who weep, but to rejoice with those who rejoice was unknown to her. Joy was beautiful, too, but his was the radiant beauty of the summer morning. His eyes still held the glad laughter of childhood, and his hair had the glint of the sunshine’s kiss. When Joy sang his voice soared upward as the lark’s, and his step was the step of a conqueror who has never known defeat. He could rejoice with all who rejoice, but to weep with those who weep was unknown to him.

“But we can never be united,” said Sorrow wistfully. “No, never.” And Joy’s eyes shadowed as he spoke. “My path lies through the sunlit meadows, the sweetest roses bloom for my gathering, and the blackbirds and thrushes await my coming to pour forth their most joyous lays.” “My path,” said Sorrow, turning slowly away, “leads through the darkening woods, with moonflowers only shall my hands be filled. Yet the sweetest of all earth-songs—the love song of the night—shall be mine; farewell, Joy, farewell.”

Even as she spoke they became conscious of a form standing beside them; dimly seen, but of a Kingly Presence, and a great and holy awe stole over them as they sank on their knees before Him.

“I see Him as the King of Joy,” whispered Sorrow, “for on His Head are many crowns, and the nailprints in His hands and feet are the scars of a great victory. Before Him all my sorrow is melting away into deathless love and gladness, and I give myself to Him forever.” “Nay, Sorrow,” said Joy softly, “but I see Him as the King of Sorrow, and the crown on His head is a crown of thorns, and the nailprints in His hands and feet are the scars of a great agony. I, too, give myself to Him forever, for sorrow with Him must be sweeter than any joy that I have known.”

“Then we are one in Him,” they cried in gladness, “for none but He could unite Joy and Sorrow.”

Hand in hand they passed out into the world to follow Him through storm and sunshine, in the bleakness of winter cold and the warmth of summer gladness, “as sorrowful yet always rejoicing.”

“Should Sorrow lay her hand upon thy shoulder,
And walk with thee in silence on life’s way,
While Joy, thy bright companion once, grown colder,
Becomes to thee more distant day by day?
Shrink not from the companionship of Sorrow,

She is the messenger of God to thee;
And thou wilt thank Him in His great tomorrow—
For what thou knowest not now, thou then shalt see;
She is God’s angel, clad in weeds of night,
With ‘whom we walk by faith and not by sight.'”

Pull me out of the net that they have laid privily for me: for Thou art my strength

“Pull me out of the net that they have laid privily for me: for Thou art my strength.” Psalm 31:4

Our spiritual foes are of the serpent’s brood, a and seek to ensnare us by subtlety. The prayer before us supposes the possibility of the believer being caught like a bird. So deftly does the fowler do his work, that simple ones are soon surrounded by the net. The text asks that even out of Satan’s meshes the captive one may be delivered; this is a proper petition, and one which can be granted: from between the jaws of the lion, and out of the belly of hell, can eternal love rescue the saint. It may need a sharp pull to save a soul from the net of temptations, and a mighty pull to extricate a man from the snares of malicious cunning, but the Lord is equal to every emergency, and the most skilfully placed nets of the hunter shall never be able to hold His chosen ones. Woe unto those who are so clever at net laying; they who tempt others shall be destroyed themselves.

“For Thou art my strength.” What an inexpressible sweetness is to be found in these few words! How joyfully may we encounter toils, and how cheerfully may we endure sufferings, when we can lay hold upon celestial strength. Divine power will rend asunder all the toils of our enemies, confound their politics, and frustrate their knavish tricks; he is a happy man who has such matchless might engaged upon his side. Our own strength would be of little service when embarrassed in the nets of base cunning, but the Lord’s strength is ever available; we have but to invoke it, and we shall find it near at hand. If by faith we are depending alone upon the strength of the mighty God of Israel, we may use our holy reliance as a plea in supplication.

He shall stand and feed in the strength of the Lord

“He shall stand and feed in the strength of the Lord.” Micah 5:4

Christ’s reign in His Church is that of a shepherd-king. He has supremacy, but it is the superiority of a wise and tender shepherd over his needy and loving flock; He commands and receives obedience, but it is the willing obedience of the well-cared-for sheep, rendered joyfully to their beloved Shepherd, whose voice they know so well. He rules by the force of love and the energy of goodness.

His reign is practical in its character. It is said, “He shall stand and feed.” The great Head of the Church is actively engaged in providing for His people. He does not sit down upon the throne in empty state, or hold a sceptre without wielding it in government. No, He stands and feeds. The expression “feed,” in the original, is like an analogous one in the Greek, which means to shepherdize, to do everything expected of a shepherd: to guide, to watch, to preserve, to restore, to tend, as well as to feed.

His reign is continual in its duration. It is said, “He shall stand and feed”; not “He shall feed now and then, and leave His position”; not, “He shall one day grant a revival, and then next day leave His Church to barrenness.” His eyes never slumber, and His hands never rest; His heart never ceases to beat with love, and His shoulders are never weary of carrying His people’s burdens.

His reign is effectually powerful in its action; “He shall feed in the strength of Jehovah.” Wherever Christ is, there is God; and whatever Christ does is the act of the Most High. Oh! it is a joyful truth to consider that He who stands today representing the interests of His people is very God of very God, to whom every knee shall bow. Happy are we who belong to such a shepherd, whose humanity communes with us, and whose divinity protects us. Let us worship and bow down before Him as the people of His pasture.