VIDEO 13-Year-Old Country Singer Inspiration

Next time you think you can’t, watch this....
Sept. 13, 2013 by Jonathon M. Seidl

Rion Paige may have a different way of spelling her name, but it’s probably one you should get used to. That’s because the spunky 13-year-old country singer brought the “X Factor” judges to their feet Wednesday with her rendition of a Carrie Underwood song.

Besides a solid voice and a special name, Paige is unique for another reason: She has a rare disease that has left her wrist joints deformed and she’s almost completely blind in her right eye. But you’d never know it from her attitude.

“I have arthrogryposis multiplex congenita, which is basically a whole bunch of words to describe something simple,” she said with about as much energy as an F-5 tornado.
X Factor judges give Rion Paige standing ovation | 13 year old girls amazing X Factor performance

“Ever since I was little I would just sort of find a way to get to a microphone,” she explained to producers. “I would put it in between my knees, and try to get it into my foot, and put it in my mouth.”

Still, she admitted she does get frustrated at times, but music helps her “explain her feelings.”

But don’t think she wants any pity for having physical struggles.

“I just don’t want the judges to take pity or think of me as different,” she said.

Then she let it rip:

The judges loved it.

“Rion, I’m just so impressed with you right now and I cannot believe the struggles you have had and how positive you are,” judge Demi Lovato said after her, her counterparts, and the audience couldn’t help but giver her a standing ovation. “I think everybody in this room can learn something from you today.”

And yes, even Simon Cowell was moved.

“I think you’re literally extraordinary,” he said. “I really do.”

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2013/09/13/watch-a-13-year-old-country-singer-bring-even-simon-cowell-to-his-feet/

Sweeter After a Rest

In six days the LORD made everything.… On the seventh day he rested. EXODUS 20:11

Time has skyrocketed in value. The value of any commodity depends on its scarcity. And time that once was abundant now is going to the highest bidder.…

When I was ten years old, my mother enrolled me in piano lessons.… Spending thirty minutes every afternoon tethered to a piano bench was a torture.…

Some of the music, though, I learned to enjoy. I hammered the staccatos. I belabored the crescendos.… But there was one instruction in the music I could never obey to my teacher’s satisfaction. The rest. The zigzagged command to do nothing. What sense does that make? Why sit at the piano and pause when you can pound?

“Because,” my teacher patiently explained, “music is always sweeter after a rest.”

It didn’t make sense to me at age ten. But now, a few decades later, the words ring with wisdom—divine wisdom.

The Applause of Heaven

How We Can Have Peace

Genesis 41:1-32

In Genesis 41, there’s an interesting story about a powerful king who had two unusual dreams in the same night. Because the dreams appeared to have some significance—and because the king couldn’t understand their meaning—he was troubled in his spirit. Consequently, he called for his magicians to interpret the dreams, but when they were unable to produce explanations, the monarch’s anxiety increased.

Then he summoned Joseph, who calmed the king with these words: “God shall give Pharaoh an answer of peace” (v. 16 kjv). Interestingly, the Lord did not actually promise every aspect of the dreams would be explained, but rather He offered a “peaceable” answer.

As it happened, God did choose to explain this particular dream in great detail, but that isn’t always the case. Too often, we lose our peace when the Lord gives direction or correction coupled with very little explanation.

Jesus had numerous “hard sayings” that were never explained to His followers’ satisfaction. It bothered some of them to the point that “many of His disciples withdrew, and were not walking with Him
anymore” (John 6:66). They simply were not satisfied with Jesus’ partial explanations.

In Christian service, we want every- thing explained: Where am I to go? What will I be paid? Who will go with me? In God’s timing, some of these questions may be answered. In the meantime, however, peace rests not in explanations but in the One who is Himself our peace (Eph. 2:14).

The Teacher

“And the servant of the Lord must not strive; but be gentle unto all men, apt to teach, patient.” (2 Timothy 2:24)

Patience and gentleness are invaluable Christian virtues in any occupation. Teaching, however, involves other attributes as well, and these are effectively set forth by Paul in the second letter to young Pastor Timothy. Consider just four of these important exhortations to God-called teachers.

“Be straight.” Soundness in doctrine is absolutely essential, the most vital criterion of all. “Hold fast the form of sound words. . . . Shun profane and vain babblings. . . . Preach the word . . . Exhort with all longsuffering and doctrine. . . . Endure sound doctrine” (1:13; 2:16; 4:2-3). Straight doctrine is the basis of everything.

“Be strong.” One can, of course, be strong and gentle at the same time, and this is what God requires. “Thou therefore, my son, be strong in the grace that is in Christ Jesus” (2:1). A non-gracious Christian leader is a dis-grace to his calling.

“Be studious.” The Lord has given us His inspired Word, and a “sound mind” with which to study it, as well as “the Holy Ghost which dwelleth in us” (1:7, 14) to illuminate it, and He expects us to be diligent in its use. “Study to show thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth” (2:15).

“Be steadfast.” As he concludes, Paul foresees the awful spiritual and moral conditions of the last days­—surely enough to intimidate and discourage any Christian. “But,” he then says “continue . . . in the things which thou hast learned” (3:14). This exhortation is followed by the strongest passage on the full divine inspiration, authority, and sufficiency of the Scriptures to be found in the Bible. Regardless of circumstances, a Christian teacher must maintain sound doctrine, be both strong and gracious, be diligent in handling the Scriptures, and just “live there” in the Word of God. HMM

Time fixed for my meeting the Lord

“Come up in the morning…. and present thyself unto me in the top of the mount.” (Exod. 34:2.)

The morning is the time fixed for my meeting the Lord. The very word morning is as a cluster of rich grapes. Let us crush them, and drink the sacred wine. In the morning! Then God means me to be at my best in strength and hope. I have not to climb in my weakness. In the night I have buried yesterday’s fatigue, and in the morning take a new lease of energy. Blessed is the day whose morning is sanctified! Successful is the day whose first victory was won in prayer! Holy is the day whose dawn finds thee on the top of the mount!

My Father, I am coming. Nothing on the mean plain shall keep me away from the holy heights. At Thy bidding I come, so Thou wilt meet me. Morning on the mount! It will make me strong and glad all the rest of the day so well begun. —Joseph Parker.

Still, still with Thee, when purple morning breaketh,
When the bird waketh, and the shadows flee;
Fairer than morning, lovelier than daylight,
Dawns the sweet consciousness, I am with Thee.

Alone with Thee, amid the mystic shadows,
The solemn hush of nature newly born;
Alone with Thee in breathless adoration,
In the calm dew and freshness of the morn.

As in the dawning o’er the waveless ocean,
The image of the morning-star doth rest,
So in this stillness, Thou beholdest only
Thine image in the waters of my breast.

When sinks the soul, subdued by toil, to slumber,
Its closing eyes look up to Thee in prayer;
Sweet the repose, beneath Thy wings o’er shadowing,
But sweeter still to wake and find Thee there.
—Harriet Beecher Stowe.

My mother’s habit was every day, immediately after breakfast, to withdraw for an hour to her own room, and to spend that hour in reading the Bible, in meditation and prayer. From that hour, as from a pure fountain, she drew the strength and sweetness which enabled her to fulfill all her duties, and to remain unruffled by the worries and pettinesses which are so often the trial of narrow neighborhoods. As I think of her life, and all it had to bear, I see the absolute triumph of Christian grace in the lovely ideal of a Christian lady. I never saw her temper disturbed; I never heard her speak one word of anger, of calumny, or of idle gossip; I never observed in her any sign of a single sentiment unbecoming to a soul which had drunk of the river of the water of life, and which had fed upon manna in the barren wilderness.—Farrar.

Give God the blossom of the day. Do not put Him off with faded leaves.

This man receiveth sinners

“This man receiveth sinners.” Luke 15:2

Observe the condescension of this fact. This Man, who towers above all other men, holy, harmless, undefiled, and separate from sinners—this Man receiveth sinners. This Man, who is no other than the eternal God, before whom angels veil their faces—this Man receiveth sinners. It needs an angel’s tongue to describe such a mighty stoop of love. That any of us should be willing to seek after the lost is nothing wonderful—they are of our own race; but that He, the offended God, against whom the transgression has been committed, should take upon Himself the form of a servant, and bear the sin of many, and should then be willing to receive the vilest of the vile, this is marvellous.

“This Man receiveth sinners”; not, however, that they may remain sinners, but He receives them that He may pardon their sins, justify their persons, cleanse their hearts by His purifying word, preserve their souls by the indwelling of the Holy Ghost, and enable them to serve Him, to show forth His praise, and to have communion with Him. Into His heart’s love He receives sinners, takes them from the dunghill, and wears them as jewels in His crown; plucks them as brands from the burning, and preserves them as costly monuments of His mercy. None are so precious in Jesus’ sight as the sinners for whom He died.

When Jesus receives sinners, He has not some out-of-doors reception place, no casual ward where He charitably entertains them as men do passing beggars, but He opens the golden gates of His royal heart, and receives the sinner right into Himself—yea, He admits the humble penitent into personal union and makes Him a member of His body, of His flesh, and of His bones. There was never such a reception as this! This fact is still most sure this evening, He is still receiving sinners: would to God sinners would receive Him.

Comfort obtained by a one may often prove helpful to another

“Who passing through the valley of Baca make it a well, the rain also filleth the pools.” Psalm 84:6

This teaches us that the comfort obtained by a one may often prove serviceable to another; just as wells would be used by the company who came after. We read some book full of consolation, which is like Jonathan’s rod, dropping with honey. Ah! we think our brother has been here before us, and digged this well for us as well as for himself. Many a “Night of Weeping,” “Midnight Harmonies,” an “Eternal Day,” “A Crook in the Lot,” a “Comfort for Mourners,” has been a well digged by a pilgrim for himself, but has proved quite as useful to others. Specially we notice this in the Psalms, such as that beginning, “Why art thou cast down, O my soul?” Travellers have been delighted to see the footprint of man on a barren shore, and we love to see the waymarks of pilgrims while passing through the vale of tears.

The pilgrims dig the well, but, strange enough, it fills from the top instead of the bottom. We use the means, but the blessing does not spring from the means. We dig a well, but heaven fills it with rain. The horse is prepared against the day of battle, but safety is of the Lord. The means are connected with the end, but they do not of themselves produce it. See here the rain fills the pools, so that the wells become useful as reservoirs for the water; labour is not lost, but yet it does not supersede divine help.

Grace may well be compared to rain for its purity, for its refreshing and vivifying influence, for its coming alone from above, and for the sovereignty with which it is given or withheld. May our readers have showers of blessing, and may the wells they have digged be filled with water! Oh, what are means and ordinances without the smile of heaven! They are as clouds without rain, and pools without water. O God of love, open the windows of heaven and pour us out a blessing!