VIDEO ‘Mystery priest’ and ‘miracle’ car crash survivor Katie Lentz

September 20, 2013 By Cristina Corbin

The Rev. Patrick Dowling is flesh and blood, but to an Illinois woman whom the priest mysteriously ministered to as she lay trapped in the mangled wreckage of a car crash last month, he will always be an angel.

Today, on her twentieth birthday, Katie Lentz will meet the “miracle” priest, who left police baffled after appearing behind a police line at the Missouri crash scene to pray with her, then disappeared into the night. Lentz has endured a long recovery after the accident, in which her car was hit head-on by an alleged drunk driver, but she counts herself lucky that Dowling, who stepped forward after numerous reports about the “mystery priest,” was there in her time of need.

“It’s a miracle my daughter is alive,” her mother, Carla Churchill Lentz, told FoxNews.com in an emotional interview Friday. “She wasn’t expected to live.

“She is going to walk again,” she said.

“It’s a miracle my daughter is alive.”

– Carla Churchill Lentz, mother of crash victim

Katie, a Tulane University student from Quincy, Ill., was struck by a suspected drunk motorist at around 9 a.m. on Aug. 4 while driving on Route 19 near the town of Center, Mo., causing the 1989 green Mercedes she lovingly called the “Green Bean” to flip — trapping her inside its mangled wreckage.

The young woman suffered 15 broken bones and a lacerated liver and spleen. Her “vitals were failing quickly” by the time rescue workers arrived, her mother said. After two hours and 10 minutes trapped inside the car, she was extricated and air lifted to Blessing Hospital in Quincy, IL, her hometown.

The woman’s family credits two occurrences for her survival: Katie’s plea for first responders and witnesses to “pray out loud” as she lay with her head on the pavement and the arrival of a mystery priest, later identified as Rev. Patrick Dowling, who anointed her with oil and prayed at her side.

“We are so thankful for the simple message our Katie spoke from the very beginning — for everyone around her to pray out loud,” her mother said. “That message went around the world, and was propelled by the mystery priest we now know as Father Dowling, who just happened upon the accident and he offered his prayers.”

Dowling came across the crash in northeast Missouri while driving between morning Mass assignments.

Dowling, who is based in Columbia, Mo., “is pleased that he was able to help by performing his ministry and noted that he was just one of many who responded to assist the victim at the accident,” the Roman Catholic Diocese of Jefferson City said at the time.

The clergyman visited Katie in the intensive care unit one week after the crash, but the meeting was very short, given Katie’s fragile condition, according to her family.

“Today is the real reunion,” her mother said.

In the weeks that followed the crash, Katie received get-well cards from all over world — in countries as far away as South Africa and Australia. The family has established a website, called “roadsidemiracle.com,” to raise money for Katie’s medical expenses. The site also advertises a “5k Run/Walk,” to be held on Oct. 19, with proceeds benefiting the first responders who helped saved Katie’s life.

Katie’s mother is overwhelmed by what to say to Dowling when he arrives Friday afternoon at the family’s Illinois home to celebrate Katie’s birthday.

“The Bible tells us the steps of a righteous man are ordered by the Lord,” she said. “And I believe Father Dowling was at the right place at the right time.”

“There are so many reasons she should have perished,” Lentz said. “When you see the pictures from the crash, you say to yourself, ‘God is good.'”

http://www.roadsidemiracle.com/#the-miracle

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2013/09/20/mystery-priest-to-reunite-with-miracle-car-crash-surviver-katie-lentz/

A Difficult Place

I will never leave you nor forsake you. —Hebrews 13:5

When a sudden change in technology made his job obsolete, a highly trained scientist found himself working in a fast-food restaurant. One evening after our Bible study he described the situation as difficult and humbling. He said, “One good thing I can say is that the young people there seem very interested in my faith.” A member of the group responded, “I admire you for being humble. I know your faith must have something to do with it.”

Like my acquaintance, Philip may have wondered why God would pull him off an assignment in Samaria (Acts 8:4-8) and plop him in the middle of the desert (v.26). But then he found that the Ethiopian needed help understanding the Scriptures (vv.27-35), and his place made sense.

When Jesus promised He would never leave us alone (Matt. 28:20; Heb. 13:5), He meant in the hard times as well as in the good times. Our mission in the difficult seasons of life is to work or serve remembering we are doing it for God, and then to watch as God works to accomplish His purposes. Look for God in your difficult place and discover what He’s doing in and through you there. by Randy Kilgore

Disappointment—His appointment,
No good thing will He withhold;
From denials oft we gather
Treasures of His love untold. —Young

What’s better than answers to our why questions? Trusting a good God who has His reasons.

Protecting Against Satanic Attack

Matthew 4:1-11

As soldiers in God’s army, we are engaged in spiritual warfare. To hold our ground, we must be arrayed in battle gear every day.

Be sure your feet are shod with the gospel of peace. Roman military boots had metal cleats to help soldiers stand firm in battle. Similarly, our spiritual “shoes” provide the solid footing of assurance—the certainty that we have peace with God and are safe in Him (John 10:28).

Carry the shield of faith. The most powerful asset we have as believers is our faith. It helps us to resist the Enemy’s temptations by thinking, I know I have this need, but I trust in God. So I’ll wait for the Lord to provide for it in His way and in His time. We are well protected behind the shield of faith.

Wear the helmet of salvation. The mind is Satan’s battlefield; it needs to be conscientiously and effectively guarded. In a spiritual battle, our assurance that we are saved will help repel the Enemy’s lies, which might cause us to question God or to think contrary to Scripture. With such certainty, our minds are able to remain steady.

Carry the sword of the Spirit. God’s Word is both an offensive and defensive weapon. It makes inroads for the gospel (Heb. 4:12) and also protects us. As Jesus proved in His desert temptation, the Devil cannot stand against it.

The spiritual battle raging around us is real and fierce (Eph. 6:12). We are not in the reserves, simply waiting to be called up. We are in the war. Soldier of God, are you fully dressed for battle?

Whom Do You Know?

“For I know whom I have believed, and am persuaded that he is able to keep that which I have committed unto him against that day.” (2 Timothy 1:12)

A person who thinks he is a Christian, or hopes he is a Christian, probably isn’t a Christian. One should know, when it comes to this most important of all questions. “These things have I written unto you that believe on the name of the Son of God; that ye may know that ye have eternal life” (1 John 5:13). It’s a matter of who you know, not what you know. Paul said: “I know whom I have believed”—that is, he knew the Lord Jesus Christ, the Son of God.

But just how can we know that we have eternal life? In the first place, we know because He has said so in His Word. Furthermore, He knows us! “My sheep hear my voice, and I know them, and they follow me: And I give unto them eternal life; and they shall never perish, neither shall any man pluck them out of my hand” (John 10:27-28).

We also “know . . . that we dwell in him, and he in us, because he hath given us of his Spirit” (1 John 4:13), which “beareth witness with our spirit, that we are the children of God” (Romans 8:16). If the Holy Spirit truly has become a part of our lives (as He surely has if we genuinely came to Christ as lost sinners, trusting Him alone for forgiveness and salvation, and yielding our lives and eternal souls to Him), then we will also come to love the Word which He inspired. “And hereby we do know that we know him, if we keep his commandments. . . . But whoso keepeth his word, in him verily is the love of God perfected: hereby know we that we are in him” (1 John 2:3, 5).

There are many other things we can know when we know we are saved. Best of all, “we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to his purpose” (Romans 8:28). HMM

“Said I not unto thee, that, if thou wouldest believe, thou shouldest see the glory of God?

“Said I not unto thee, that, if thou wouldest believe, thou shouldest see the glory of God?” (John 11:40.)

MARY and Martha could not understand what their Lord was doing. Both of them said to Him, “Lord, if thou hadst been here, my brother had not died.” Back of it all, we seem to read their thought: “Lord, we do not understand why you have stayed away so long. We do not understand how you could let death come to the man whom you loved. We do not understand how you could let sorrow and suffering ravage our lives when your presence might have stayed it all. Why did you not come? It is too late now, for already he has been dead four days!”

And to it all Jesus had but one great truth: “You may not understand; but I tell you if you believe, you will see.”

Abraham could not understand why God should ask the sacrifice of the boy; but he trusted. And he saw the glory of God in his restoration to his love. Moses could not understand why God should keep him forty years in the wilderness, but he trusted; and he saw when God called him to lead forth Israel from bondage.

Joseph could not understand the cruelty of his brethren, the false witness of a perfidious woman, and the long years of an unjust imprisonment; but he trusted, and he saw at last the glory of God in it all.

Jacob could not understand the strange providence which permitted the same Joseph to be torn from his father’s love, but he saw the glory of God when he looked into the face of that same Joseph as the viceroy of a great king, and the preserver of his own life and the lives of a great nation.

And so, perhaps in your life. You say, “I do not understand why God let my dear one be taken. I do not understand why affliction has been permitted to smite me. I do not understand the devious paths by which the Lord is leading me. I do not understand why plans and purposes that seemed good to my eyes should be baffled. I do not understand why blessings I so much need are so long delayed.

Friend, you do not have to understand all God’s ways with you. God does not expect you to understand them. You do not expect your child to understand, only believe. Some day you will see the glory of God in the things which you do not understand.—J. H. McC.

“If we could push ajar the gates of life,
And stand within, and all God’s working see,
We might interpret all this doubt and strife,
And for each mystery could find a key.

“But not today. Then be content, poor heart;
God’s plans, like lilies pure and white, unfold.
We must not tear the close-shut leaves apart—
Time will reveal the calyxes of gold.

“And if, through patient toil, we reach the land
Where tired feet, with sandals loosed, may rest,
When we shall clearly know and understand,
I think that we shall say, ‘God knew best.'”

In the evening withhold not thy hand

“In the evening withhold not thy hand.” Ecclesiastes 11:6

In the evening of the day opportunities are plentiful: men return from their labour, and the zealous soul-winner finds time to tell abroad the love of Jesus. Have I no evening work for Jesus? If I have not, let me no longer withhold my hand from a service which requires abundant labour. Sinners are perishing for lack of knowledge; he who loiters may find his skirts crimson with the blood of souls. Jesus gave both His hands to the nails, how can I keep back one of mine from His blessed work? Night and day He toiled and prayed for me, how can I give a single hour to the pampering of my flesh with luxurious ease? Up, idle heart; stretch out thy hand to work, or uplift it to pray; heaven and hell are in earnest, let me be so, and this evening sow good seed for the Lord my God.

The evening of life has also its calls. Life is so short that a morning of manhood’s vigour, and an evening of decay, make the whole of it. To some it seems long, but a four-pence is a great sum of money to a poor man. Life is so brief that no man can afford to lose a day. It has been well said that if a great king should bring us a great heap of gold, and bid us take as much as we could count in a day, we should make a long day of it; we should begin early in the morning, and in the evening we should not withhold our hand; but to win souls is far nobler work, how is it that we so soon withdraw from it? Some are spared to a long evening of green old age; if such be my case, let me use such talents as I still retain, and to the last hour serve my blessed and faithful Lord. By His grace I will die in harness, and lay down my charge only when I lay down my body. Age may instruct the young, cheer the faint, and encourage the desponding; if eventide has less of vigorous heat, it should have more of calm wisdom, therefore in the evening I will not withhold my hand.

The sword of the Lord, and of Gideon

“The sword of the Lord, and of Gideon.” Judges 7:20

Gideon ordered his men to do two things: covering up a torch in an earthen pitcher, he bade them, at an appointed signal, break the pitcher and let the light shine, and then sound with the trumpet, crying, “The sword of the Lord, and of Gideon! the sword of the Lord, and of Gideon!” This is precisely what all Christians must do. First, you must shine; break the pitcher which conceals your light; throw aside the bushel which has been hiding your candle, and shine. Let your light shine before men; let your good works be such, that when men look upon you, they shall know that you have been with Jesus.

Then there must be the sound, the blowing of the trumpet. There must be active exertions for the ingathering of sinners by proclaiming Christ crucified. Take the gospel to them; carry it to their door; put it in their way; do not suffer them to escape it; blow the trumpet right against their ears. Remember that the true war-cry of the Church is Gideon’s watchword, “The sword of the Lord, and of Gideon!” God must do it, it is His own work. But we are not to be idle; instrumentality is to be used—”The sword of the Lord, and of Gideon!” If we only cry, “The sword of the Lord!” we shall be guilty of an idle presumption; and if we shout, “The sword of Gideon!” alone, we shall manifest idolatrous reliance on an arm of flesh: we must blend the two in practical harmony, “The sword of the Lord, and of Gideon!”

We can do nothing of ourselves, but we can do everything by the help of our God; let us, therefore, in His name determine to go out personally and serve with our flaming torch of holy example, and with our trumpet tones of earnest declaration and testimony, and God shall be with us, and Midian shall be put to confusion, and the Lord of hosts shall reign for ever and ever.