VIDEO Not My Will But Thine Be Done

Nov 7, 2010

If I ask for things
That I should not ask for
If I pray for things selfishly
If I ask for myself
And not for my neighbor
Take this veil from my eyes
And let me see

“Chorus”
Not my will but thine be done
Prayed Jesus
May the same prayer be mine
Everyday
When this robe of flesh that I wear
Makes me faulter
Guide my steps
Hold my hand
All the way

“Verse 2”
If I love all the friends
And serve them only
If I serve all the rich and not the poor
What good would I have done
For Christ my savior
Since my, since my enemies do the same

“Chorus”
Not my will but thine be done
Prayed Jesus
May the same prayer be mine
Everyday
When this robe of flesh that I wear
Makes me faulter
Guide my steps
Hold my hand
All the way

“Chorus (Repeat Twice)”
Not my will but thine be done
Prayed Jesus
May the same prayer be mine
Everyday
When this robe of flesh that I wear
Makes me faulter
Guide my steps
Hold my hand
All the way

Trust God with the Future

Don’t let your hearts be troubled. Trust in God, and trust in me. JOHN 14:1

Our [little] minds are ill-equipped to handle the thoughts of eternity. When it comes to a world with no boundaries of space and time, we don’t have the hooks for those hats. Consequently, our Lord takes the posture of a parent, … Trust me.…

Don’t be troubled by the return of Christ. Don’t be anxious about things you cannot comprehend.… For the Christian, the return of Christ is not a riddle to be solved or a code to be broken, but rather a day to be anticipated.

When Christ Comes

The Ultimate Rejection

Matthew 7:13-27

There is nothing that strikes deeper into the human psyche than rejection. The knowledge that someone considers us unwanted, unwelcome, or unqualified cuts to the core of our sense of self-worth. A rejected manuscript, failure to be accepted at our college of choice, or loss of a job—such things litter the landscape of our lives. Fortunately, most of us find we can handle this type of occurrence, though the experience is anything but pleasant.

The Bible speaks of a different kind of rejection, which is quite another matter. It is hard to grasp the ultimate horror that will be experienced by those who turn down God’s loving offer of salvation. They will hear these three words coming from the mouth of Jesus: “Depart from Me.” More than once, our Lord speaks these words in the gospels, anouncing the doom of the disobedient. These individuals will find their lot in the agony of eternal separation from God.

Many people have stumbled over the apparent harshness of Jesus’ words. They fail to recognize that this ultimate rejection is actually an appropriate response to the unbeliever’s refusal to receive the Lord’s solution for mankind’s sin problem. Yes, this rejection is the end of the road, but it’s a road paved with a lifetime of choices that left God out. Every decision to go it alone is a choice to embrace that final verdict of the Savior. Or as G. K. Chesterton expressed it, “Hell is God’s great compliment to the reality of human freedom and the dignity of human choice.”

Consecrated

“I beseech you therefore, brethren, by the mercies of God, that ye present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God, which is your reasonable service.” (Romans 12:1)

This Scripture speaks of total consecration to God. A willing believer must come to the point where he or she totally commits everything to the Savior, trusting that He will transform it into that which is pleasing and useful to Him. The precious Christian hymn “Take My Life and Let It Be” echoes the same thought.

Take my life, and let it be
Consecrated, Lord, to Thee.
Take my moments and my days,
Let them flow in ceaseless praise.

A grateful Christian so values the things of God that he will consecrate everything to Him, like the wise man in Christ’s parable: “The kingdom of heaven is like unto treasure hid in a field; the which when a man hath found, he hideth it, and for joy thereof goeth and selleth all that he hath, and buyeth that field” (Matthew 13:44).

A consecrated life involves not only one’s possessions, but one’s entire life. Our choices and thoughts should always be made with Him and His priorities in mind. “See then that ye walk circumspectly, not as fools, but as wise, redeeming the time, because the days are evil” (Ephesians 5:15-16).

We have been redeemed from lives of sin and eternal worthlessness. Our Rescuer, the Lord Jesus, deserves our undying praise. There is no better use of our time and abilities. “By him therefore let us offer the sacrifice of praise to God continually, that is, the fruit of our lips giving thanks to his name” (Hebrews 13:15). JDM

Some wonder why they have not been filled by the Holy Spirit

“He that believeth on me, as the scripture hath said, out of his inner being shall flow rivers of living water.” (John 7:38.)

SOME of us are shivering and wondering why the Holy Spirit does not fill us. We have plenty coming in, but we do not give it out. Give out the blessing that you have, start larger plans for service and blessing, and you will soon find that the Holy Ghost is before you, and He will present you with blessings for service, and give you all that He can trust you to give away to others.

There is a beautiful fact in nature which has its spiritual parallels. There is no music so heavenly as an Aeolian harp, and the Aeolian harp is nothing but a set of musical chords arranged in harmony, and then left to be touched by the unseen fingers of the wandering winds. And as the breath of heaven floats over the chords, it is said that notes almost Divine float out upon the air, as if a choir of angels were wandering around and touching the strings.

And so it is possible to keep our hearts so open to the touch of the Holy Spirit that He can play upon them at will, as we quietly wait in the pathway of His service.—Days of Heaven upon Earth. When the apostles received the baptism with the Holy Ghost they did not rent the upper room and stay there to hold, holiness meetings, but went everywhere preaching the gospel. —Will Huff.

“If I have eaten my morsel alone,”
The patriarch spoke with scorn;
What would he think of the Church were he shown
Heathendom—huge, forlorn,
Godless, Christless, with soul unfed,
While the Church’s ailment is fullness of bread,
Eating her morsel alone?

“Freely ye have received, so give,”
He bade, who hath given us all.
How shall the soul in us longer live
Deaf to their starving call,
For whom the blood of the Lord was shed,
And His tody “broken to give them bread,
If we eat our morsel alone!”
—Archbishop Alexander.

Jesus said unto him, If thou canst believe

“Jesus said unto him, If thou canst believe.” Mark 9:23

A certain man had a demoniac son, who was afflicted with a dumb spirit. The father, having seen the futility of the endeavours of the disciples to heal his child, had little or no faith in Christ, and therefore, when he was bidden to bring his son to Him, he said to Jesus, “If Thou cast do anything, have compassion on us, and help us.” Now there was an “if” in the question, but the poor trembling father had put the “if” in the wrong place: Jesus Christ, therefore, without commanding him to retract the “if,” kindly puts it in its legitimate position. “Nay, verily,” He seemed to say, “there should be no ‘if’ about My power, nor concerning My willingness, the ‘if’ lies somewhere else.”

“If thou canst believe, all things are possible to him that believeth.” The man’s trust was strengthened, he offered a humble prayer for an increase of faith, and instantly Jesus spoke the word, and the devil was cast out, with an injunction never to return. There is a lesson here which we need to learn. We, like this man, often see that there is an “if” somewhere, but we are perpetually blundering by putting it in the wrong place. “If” Jesus can help me—”if” He can give me grace to overcome temptation—”if” He can give me pardon—”if” He can make me successful?

Nay, “if” you can believe, He both can and will. You have misplaced your “if.” If you can confidently trust, even as all things are possible to Christ, so shall all things be possible to you. Faith standeth in God’s power, and is robed in God’s majesty; it weareth the royal apparel, and rideth on the King’s horse, for it is the grace which the King delighteth to honour. Girding itself with the glorious might of the all-working Spirit, it becomes, in the omnipotence of God, mighty to do, to dare, and to suffer. All things, without limit, are possible to him that believeth. My soul, canst thou believe thy Lord to-night?

Accepted in the beloved

“Accepted in the beloved.” Ephesians 1:6

What a state of privilege! It includes our justification before God, but the term acceptance” in the Greek means more than that. It signifies that we are the objects of divine complacence, nay, even of divine delight. How marvellous that we, worms, mortals, sinners, should be the objects of divine love! But it is only “in the beloved.” Some Christians seem to be accepted in their own experience, at least, that is their apprehension. When their spirit is lively, and their hopes bright, they think God accepts them, for they feel so high, so heavenly-minded, so drawn above the earth! But when their souls cleave to the dust, they are the victims of the fear that they are no longer accepted.

If they could but see that all their high joys do not exalt them, and all their low despondencies do not really depress them in their Father’s sight, but that they stand accepted in One who never alters, in One who is always the beloved of God, always perfect, always without spot or wrinkle, or any such thing, how much happier they would be, and how much more they would honour the Saviour! Rejoice then, believer, in this: thou art accepted “in the beloved.” Thou lookest within, and thou sayest, “There is nothing acceptable here!” But look at Christ, and see if there is not everything acceptable there. Thy sins trouble thee; but God has cast thy sins behind His back, and thou art accepted in the Righteous One.

Thou hast to fight with corruption, and to wrestle with temptation, but thou art already accepted in Him who has overcome the powers of evil. The devil tempts thee; be of good cheer, he cannot destroy thee, for thou art accepted in Him who has broken Satan’s head. Know by full assurance thy glorious standing. Even glorified souls are not more accepted than thou art. They are only accepted in heaven “in the beloved,” and thou art even now accepted in Christ after the same manner.