Complete and Effective Decision About Sin

. . . our old man was crucified with Him, that the body of sin might be done away with, that we should no longer be slaves of sin —Romans 6:6

Co-Crucifixion. Have you made the following decision about sin—that it must be completely killed in you? It takes a long time to come to the point of making this complete and effective decision about sin. It is, however, the greatest moment in your life once you decide that sin must die in you-not simply be restrained, suppressed, or counteracted, but crucified—just as Jesus Christ died for the sin of the world. No one can bring anyone else to this decision. We may be mentally and spiritually convinced, but what we need to do is actually make the decision that Paul urged us to do in this passage.

Pull yourself up, take some time alone with God, and make this important decision, saying, “Lord, identify me with Your death until I know that sin is dead in me.” Make the moral decision that sin in you must be put to death.

This was not some divine future expectation on the part of Paul, but was a very radical and definite experience in his life. Are you prepared to let the Spirit of God search you until you know what the level and nature of sin is in your life— to see the very things that struggle against God’s Spirit in you? If so, will you then agree with God’s verdict on the nature of sin— that it should be identified with the death of Jesus? You cannot “reckon yourselves to be dead indeed to sin” (Romans 6:11) unless you have radically dealt with the issue of your will before God.

Have you entered into the glorious privilege of being crucified with Christ, until all that remains in your flesh and blood is His life? “I have been crucified with Christ; it is no longer I who live, but Christ lives in me . . .” (Galatians 2:20).

By Oswald Chambers

Looking Beyond Disappointment

John 11:3-6

When disappointments come your way in life, it is easy to blame both yourself and others. Frequently it’s difficult to know what to say or do, because you cannot quite identify the real cause or purpose of the letdown.

Disappointment is often an emotional response to our own failure—or someone else’s—to achieve a desire, hope, dream, or goal. This can lead to losing faith in a person on whom we were depending, possibly even a loved one.

The gospel of John tells us that Jesus loved Martha, her sister Mary, and their brother Lazarus. Because of this, the two women didn’t sense the need to tell the Lord anything more than “He whom You love is sick” (John 11:3). Their expectation was that as soon as Jesus heard these words, He would come and heal their brother. But the Lord didn’t set out for two more days.

When Martha met Jesus, she was disappointed because He hadn’t come right away, and His delay allowed Lazarus to die. She didn’t see His purpose.

But truly, God does have a reason for the disappointments He allows in our life. He could prevent them, but He wants us to discover His purpose. His desire is that we will operate out of trust and let our circumstance bring glory to Him (John 11:4, 25).

When disappointments come, will you be stalled and derailed from the Lord’s will for your life? Or will you find yourself beginning to understand His purpose so you can learn from those situations? The right response is simply to trust Him.

The Trinity and the Christian

“The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the communion of the Holy Ghost, be with you all. Amen.” (2 Corinthians 13:14)

The doctrine of the triune God is unique to Christianity. There is only one God, yet three Persons—Father, Son, and Holy Spirit—each with His own distinct relation to mankind, yet each equally, fully, and eternally God. Although these truths are implicit throughout the New Testament, the doctrine of the Trinity is seldom, if ever, presented explicitly as a formal doctrine.

There are several passages, however, where all three Persons are mentioned in the same context, and each one deals with a significant aspect of the Christian life. There is, first of all, the provision of salvation, “the blood of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit offered himself without spot to God” (Hebrews 9:14). Then follows regeneration. “And because ye are sons, God hath sent forth the Spirit of his Son into your hearts, crying, Abba, Father” (Galatians 4:6). Salvation and regeneration are then publicly testified in baptism “in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost” (Matthew 28:19).

The chief resource of the believer is prayer, and this also involves all three Persons. “For through [Christ] we both have access by one Spirit unto the Father” (Ephesians 2:18). He must also continue to learn of Christ, and to bear witness of Him. “The Holy Ghost, whom the Father will send in my name, he shall teach you all things” (John 14:26). “The Spirit of truth, which proceedeth from the Father, he shall testify of me: And ye also shall bear witness” (John 15:26-27).

Finally, in the words of our text, we have eternal assurance in the triune God. “The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the communion of the Holy Ghost, be with you all. Amen.” HMM

Choose you this day whom ye will serve

Choose you this day whom ye will serve.—Joshua 24:15.

BARABBAS and Jesus cannot both live within us. One must die. Yes, every emotion of selfishness or worldliness in every soul plays the part of Barabbas. Good influences may have prevailed for a time, and they, or perhaps motives of worldly regard, may have put Barabbas in prison, and under some restraint; but the decisive, the fatal question, remains, Shall he die? Yes, he or Jesus. Nor is it only on great occasions and in fearful crises that this question comes to us. Every
hour, every moment, when we resist what we must know to be the influence of our Lord, and, casting that aside, give the victory, under whatever pretence or name, to that which is indeed our own Barabbas, we then do all that we are able to do to crucify our Lord afresh. Every emotion which tempts us to refuse obedience to Him, “to make insurrection,” to suppress and overcome whatever sense of right conscience gives—is not that the robber, rebel, murderer, Barabbas? We may have, indeed, imprisoned him, we may have resolved that he should die-shall we now release him from restraint, and let him go free? If we do, we know now what must happen—we know between what alternatives we choose. THEOPHILUS PARSONS.

All that will live godly in Christ Jesus shall suffer persecution

All that will live godly in Christ Jesus shall suffer persecution. 2 Timothy 3:12

I am come to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother and the daughter-in-law against her mother-in-law. And a man’s foes shall be they of his own household. —Whosoever … will be a friend of the world is the enemy of God. — Love not the world, neither the things that are in the world. If any man love the world the love of the Father is not in him. For all that is in the world, the lust of the flesh, and the lust of the eyes, and the pride of life, is not of the Father, but is of the world.

If the world hate you, ye know that it hated me before it hated you. If ye were of the world, the world would love his own: but because ye are not of the world, but I have chosen you out of the world, therefore the world hateth you. The servant is not greater than his lord. — I have given them thy word; and the world hath hated them,because they are not of the world, even as I am not of the world.

Matthew 10:35,36. James 4:4. 1 John 2:15,16. John 15:18-20. John 17:14.

I am dark, but comely

I am dark, but comely. Song of Songs 1:5

Behold, I was shapen in iniquity; and in sin did my mother conceive me. — Thy renown went forth among the heathen for thy beauty: for it was perfect through my comeliness, which I had put upon thee, saith the Lord God.

I am a sinful man, O Lord. —Behold, thou art fair, my love; behold, thou art fair. I abhor myself, and repent in dust and ashes. — Thou art all fair, my love; there is no spot in thee.

When I would do good, evil is present with me. — Be of good cheer; thy sins be forgiven thee.

I know that in me (that is, in my flesh) dwelleth no good thing — Ye are complete in him. — Perfect in Christ Jesus.

Ye are washed, … ye are sanctified, … ye are justified in the name of the Lord Jesus, and by the Spirit of our God. — That ye should shew forth the praises of him who hath called you out of darkness into his marvellous light.

Psalm 51:5. Ezekiel 16:14. Luke 5:8. Song of Songs 4:1. Job 42:6. Song of Songs 4:7. Romans 7:21. Matthew 9:2. Romans 7:18. Colossians 2:10. Colossians 1:28. 1 Corinthians 6:11. 1 Peter 2:9.