Not A Hitching Post

Ask for the old paths, where the good way is, and walk in it; then you will find rest for your souls. —Jeremiah 6:16

You may have heard the saying, “The past is supposed to be a guidepost, not a hitching post.” It’s easy to become tied to memories of “the good old days” instead of using our experiences to find direction for the road ahead. We are all susceptible to the paralyzing effects of nostalgia—a longing for what used to be.

Jeremiah was a priest from a small town near Jerusalem when God called him to be “a prophet to the nations” (Jer. 1:5). He was given the very difficult job of pronouncing God’s judgment primarily on the people of Judah, who had turned away from the Lord. Jeremiah made it clear that he was delivering God’s message, not his own (7:1-2).

The Lord said, “Stand in the ways and see, and ask for the old paths, where the good way is, and walk in it; then you will find rest for your souls. But they said, ‘We will not walk in it’” (6:16).

God urged His people to look back so they could move ahead. The purpose of considering the ancient paths was to find “the good way” marked by God’s faithfulness, His forgiveness, and His forward call.

God can teach us from our past that the best road is the one we walk with Him. By David C. McCasland

Though I know not what awaits me—
What the future has in store,
Yet I know that God is faithful,
For I’ve proved Him oft before. —Anon.

God’s guidance in the past gives courage for the future.

Powerhouse of Scientists Refute Evolution, Part Three

The information of life is in a state of gradual decay, not upward evolution, according to at least eight technical papers published in the proceedings of a unique symposium called Biological Information: New Perspectives.1

Its 23 reports from 29 different authors showed the virtual impossibility of Darwinian selection building biologically meaningful genetic information. The third of three major themes at the symposium centered on “Difficulties in Preventing Erosion of Biological Information,” according to a helpful Synopsis of the Symposium proceedings.2

Michael Behe, famous for his book Darwin’s Black Box, reviewed reports of mutations that led to new functions. Even these have always led to an overall loss of biological information. But taken altogether, most mutations cause a loss-of-function, like a mutation that erases an enzyme’s ability to manipulate a particular sugar. The loss of ability to manipulate that sugar may actually help the organism to survive, for instance, where its enzyme might grab a poisonous chemical that mimics the sugar. The Synopsis reads, “Because loss-of-function mutations inherently involve loss of information, there tends to be a net loss of information even while meaningful adaptation is happening.”2 So, even when genetic loss leads to increased survival, information is lost forever.

In another report, plant geneticists Paul Gibson and John Sanford teamed with computation experts John Baumgardner and Wesley Brewer to test whether or not natural selection could preserve biological information, adding to Behe’s observations. They found that selection cannot remove what it cannot “see.” Most single mutations have little to no effect, so these very slight DNA alterations “accumulate continuously, like rust on a car,” according to the Synopsis.2 Thus, evolutionary geneticists are incorrect when they claim that natural selection can somehow preserve biological information. It can’t and doesn’t.

In his Symposium paper, University of Texas mathematician Granville Sewell tackled the evolutionary argument that an outside energy source can reverse the universal tendency of complicated information systems to decay over time. For example, can mere sunlight entering earth somehow organize the molecules of life or expand the repertoire of living systems? Sewell examined the central formula describing disorganizing systems—one found in standard college thermodynamics textbooks. It shows that order cannot enter a system any faster than it can pass through the boundary between the outside world and that system. Because of this, importing sunlight into a living cell would add no more biological information to it than importing sunlight into a computer would build new software.

Sanford wrote of thermodynamics expert Andy MacIntosh’s Symposium paper, “The fallacy is in the assertion that energy on its own can build the necessary machinery of life.”2 Some intelligent person, or an intelligently designed machine like a robot, must direct that energy in specific ways to build machines, including those found inside cells.

These qualified scientists examined Darwinian evolution from about two dozen angles, and found a fatal flaw in each one. No living cell can can download or reinstall its original operating system, but it’s not too late for scientists and other thinking people to download and install the clear concept that eroding information continually deteriorates living systems—just the opposite of Darwinian evolution’s story.

References

-Biological Information: New Perspectives. 2013. Marks, R. J., M. J. Behe, W. A. Dembski, B. L. Gordon, and J. C. Sanford, Eds. Singapore: World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd.
-Sanford, J. C. 2014. Biological Information: New Perspectives. A Synopsis and Limited Commentary. Waterloo, NY: FMS Publications.

by Brian Thomas, M.S. who is Science Writer at the Institute for Creation Research.

Article posted on June 20, 2014.

Kingdom of Priests

“And ye shall be unto me a kingdom of priests, and an holy nation. These are the words which thou shalt speak unto the children of Israel.” (Exodus 19:6)

These were the words of God to Israel, even before they received the Ten Commandments on Mount Sinai. As a priest serves as an intermediary between God and men, so this “kingdom of priests” had been called by God to bring God’s Word to man. As a holy nation with such a high calling, its people also should have been holy (that is, consecrated to God) in life and witness. But instead, after almost 2,000 years, God had to lament: “All day long I have stretched forth my hands unto a disobedient and gainsaying people” (Romans 10:21).

A day will come when “all Israel shall be saved” (Romans 11:26), but God has, in the meantime, chosen a new people, in whom “there is neither Jew nor Greek . . . for ye are all one in Christ Jesus” (Galatians 3:28). We are now “one body in Christ, and every one members one of another” (Romans 12:5).

We now have been given the same high privileges long ago given to Israel. We who belong to Christ have been “born again” into the “kingdom of God” (John 3:3), and this is nothing less than a kingdom of priests, a holy nation. The apostle Peter said: “Ye also, as lively stones, are built up a spiritual house, an holy priesthood, to offer up spiritual sacrifices, acceptable to God by Jesus Christ” (1 Peter 2:5).

Not only are we a holy priesthood, we are a royal priesthood, a kingdom of priest-kings. “Ye are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, an holy nation, a peculiar people; that ye should shew forth the praises of him who hath called you out of darkness into his marvellous light” (v. 9). We, indeed, have a high calling, and should devote our lives to showing forth His praises, for He “hath made us kings and priests unto God and his Father; unto him be glory and dominion for ever and ever” (Revelation 1:6). HMM

We changed into the same image from glory to glory

But we all, with open face, beholding as in a glass the glory of the Lord, are changed into the same image from glory to glory.—2 Corinthians 3:18.

THY life in me be shown! Lord!
I would henceforth seek
To think and speak Thy thoughts,
Thy words alone;
No more my own.
FRANCES R. HAVERGAL.

NOTHING short of the Life of the Eternal Son of God—the Holiness, the Purity of God, is the standard at which we are to aim; that is to be reproduced in our circumstances; the Divine Perfections are to be translated, reproduced in our life, our home, our trials, our difficulties, our age of the world. Let us ask ourselves, what is the special likeness of Christ that He would reproduce in me? What are the features of His Life that He calls me to
imitate? What pattern would He set before me in my work, my circumstances, my difficulties? What are the inspirations of grace that He would urge me to cultivate and cherish? ARTHUR C.A. HALL.

The Christian life must be in its own degree something like the Master’s own life, luminous with His hope, and surrounded by a bracing atmosphere which uplifts all who even touch its outer fringe. HUGH BLACK.

Thy lovingkindness is before mine eyes

Thy lovingkindness is before mine eyes. Psalm 26:3

The LORD is gracious, and full of compassion; slow to anger, and of great mercy. —Your Father which is in heaven: … maketh his sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust.

Be ye … followers of God, as dear children; and walk in love, as Christ also hath loved us, and hath given himself for us an offering and a sacrifice to God for a sweetsmelling savour. — Be ye kind to one another, tender-hearted, forgiving one another, even as God for Christ’s sake hath forgiven you. — Seeing ye have purified your souls in obeying the truth through the Spirit unto unfeigned love of the brethren, see that ye love one another with a pure heart fervently. — The love of Christ constraineth us.

Love ye your enemies, and do good, and lend, hoping for nothing again; and your reward shall be great, and ye shall be the children of the Highest: for he is kind unto the unthankful and to the evil. Be ye therefore merciful, as your Father also is merciful.

Psalm 145:8. Matthew 5:45. Ephesians 5:1,2. Ephesians 4:32. 1 Peter 1:22. 2 Corinthians 5:14. Luke 6:35,36.

Let your speech be always with grace

Let your speech be always with grace. Colossians 4:6

A word fitly spoken is like apples of gold in pictures of silver. As an earring of gold, and an ornament of fine gold, so is a wise reprover upon an obedient ear. — Let no corrupt communication proceed out of your mouth, but that which is good to the use of edifying, that it may minister grace unto the hearers. — A good man out of the good treasure of the heart bringeth forth good things: and an evil man out of the evil treasure bringeth forth evil things. —By thy words thou shalt be justified. — The tongue of the wise is health.

They that feared the LORD spake often one to another: and the LORD hearkened, and heard it, and a book of remembrance was written before him for them that feared the LORD, and that thought upon his name.

If thou take forth the precious from the vile, thou shalt be as my mouth. — Therefore, as ye abound in every thing, in faith, and utterance, and knowledge, and in all diligence, … see that ye abound in this grace also.

Proverbs 25:11,12. Ephesians 4:29. Matthew 12:35. Matthew 12:37. Proverbs 12:18. Malachi 3:16. Jeremiah 15:19. 2 Corinthians 8:7.