VIDEO I Just Keep Trusting My Lord

Dec 1, 2009

I Just Keep Trusting My Lord by Rachel Dohling

I just keep trusting my Lord, as I walk along,
I just keep trusting my Lord, and He gives a song;
Tho the storm clouds darken the sky, o’er the heav’nly trail,
I just keep trusting my Lord, He will never fail!
He’s a faithful friend, such a faithful friend;
I can count on Him to the very end.
Tho the storm clouds darken the sky, o’er the heav’nly trail,
I just keep trusting my Lord, He will never fail!

Advertisements

Did Adam Really Live 930 Years?

adam 930
Genesis 5:5 says Adam lived for 930 years. Judging by today’s standards, this sounds impossible. Many contemporary readers of Genesis balk at such numbers and some end up rejecting the whole Bible. But a few researchers have found reasons to believe it.

Plant geneticist Dr. John Sanford and his colleagues plotted the ages of the biblical patriarchs listed in Genesis. The result shows a systematic drop-off in lifespans after 950-year-old Noah, “in a way that could never happen by chance,” according to an online post showing their results.1
adam 930 lifespans
The Genesis lifespans decline according to a well-defined decay curve that began immediately after the Flood.

The researchers’ post points out how the biological decay curve found in these biblical texts matches biological decay curves known from the science of mutation accumulation.1,2 As mutations add up after every generation, they constantly erode genetic information.

Did early mutations damage genes that once enabled human bodies to live for hundreds of years?

The authors of the post wrote, “The lifespan data indicates [sic] that the extreme longevity of the early Patriarchs was real, and that the rapid decline of longevity after the Flood was real.”

And if the patriarch’s lifespans were real, then the verses that record and refer to them accurately describe real history.

References

– Sanford, J., J. Pamplin, and C. Rupe. Genetic Entropy Recorded in the Bible? Encouragement for Believers – Science Update. Posted on logosra.org June 1, 2014, accessed June 26, 2014.
– Also see Sanford, J. 2008. Genetic Entropy. Waterloo, NY: FMS Publications, 155.

by Brian Thomas, M.S. who is Science Writer at the Institute for Creation Research.

Article posted on July 14, 2014.

The Compelling Purpose of God

He . . . said to them, ’Behold, we are going up to Jerusalem . . —Luke 18:31

Jerusalem, in the life of our Lord, represents the place where He reached the culmination of His Father’s will. Jesus said, “I do not seek My own will but the will of the Father who sent Me” (John 5:30). Seeking to do “the will of the Father” was the one dominating concern throughout our Lord’s life. And whatever He encountered along the way, whether joy or sorrow, success or failure, He was never deterred from that purpose. “. . . He steadfastly set His face to go to Jerusalem . . .” (Luke 9:51).

The greatest thing for us to remember is that we go up to Jerusalem to fulfill God’s purpose, not our own. In the natural life our ambitions are our own, but in the Christian life we have no goals of our own. We talk so much today about our decisions for Christ, our determination to be Christians, and our decisions for this and that, but in the New Testament the only aspect that is brought out is the compelling purpose of God. “You did not choose Me, but I chose you . . .” (John 15:16).

We are not taken into a conscious agreement with God’s purpose— we are taken into God’s purpose with no awareness of it at all. We have no idea what God’s goal may be; as we continue, His purpose becomes even more and more vague. God’s aim appears to have missed the mark, because we are too nearsighted to see the target at which He is aiming. At the beginning of the Christian life, we have our own ideas as to what God’s purpose is. We say, “God means for me to go over there,” and, “God has called me to do this special work.” We do what we think is right, and yet the compelling purpose of God remains upon us. The work we do is of no account when compared with the compelling purpose of God. It is simply the scaffolding surrounding His work and His plan. “He took the twelve aside . . .” (Luke 18:31). God takes us aside all the time. We have not yet understood all there is to know of the compelling purpose of God.

by Oswald Chambers

The Heart Is Deceitful

“The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately wicked: who can know it?” (Jeremiah 17:9)

Just as in modern languages, ancient Hebrew used the term “heart” to mean the inward motivations which control a person’s words and deeds. According to the prophet Jeremiah, the spiritual heart is so innately wicked and deceptive that one cannot even understand his own heart—but God does!

One urgently needs a new heart, and God promises just that. “A new heart also will I give you, and a new spirit will I put within you: and I will take away the stony heart out of your flesh, and I will give you an heart of flesh” (Ezekiel 36:26). “This is the covenant that I will make with them . . . saith the Lord, I will put my laws into their hearts” (Hebrews 10:16).

The problem, of course, is heart attitude. In the third chapter of Hebrews, this is illustrated in terms of the attitudes of the children of Israel in the wilderness. First, their hearts had become hard hearts through their lack of gratitude, and three times the author warns us to “harden not your hearts” (Hebrews 3:8, 15; 4:7). As a result, they soon acquired erring hearts. “They do alway err in their heart; and they have not known my ways” (Hebrews 3:10). Finally, their hearts were evil hearts, and God would warn us through them. “Take heed, brethren, lest there be in any of you an evil heart of unbelief, in departing from the living God” (Hebrews 3:12).

An evil heart is defined here, in effect, as an unbelieving heart. A heart which refuses to receive and believe the Word of God is a wicked heart, inevitably generating wicked ways and evil doings. But Christ will create a new heart for all who will believe on Him and confess Him as God and Savior. “That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved. For with the heart man believeth unto righteousness” (Romans 10:9-10). HMM

Oh, that thou hadst hearkened to My commandments!

Oh, that thou hadst hearkened to My commandments! Then had thy peace been as a river, and thy righteousness as the waves of the sea.—Isaiah 48:18.

IT is so easy to become more thick-skinned in conscience, more tolerant of evil, more hopeless of good, more careful of one’s own comfort and one’s own property, more self-satisfied in leaving high aims and great deeds to enthusiasts, and then to believe that one is growing older and wiser. And yet those high examples, those good works, those great triumphs over evil, which single hands
effect sometimes, we are all grateful for, when they are done, whatever we may have said of the doing. But we speak of saints and enthusiasts for good, as if some special gifts were made to them in middle age which are withheld from other men. Is it not rather that some few souls keep alive the lamp of zeal and high desire which God lights for most of us while life is young? JULANA HORATIA EWING.

To live with a high ideal is a successful life. It is not what one does, but what one tries to do, that makes the soul strong and fit for a noble career. E. P. TENNEY.

Them that honour me I will honour

Them that honour me I will honour. 1 Samuel 2:30

Whosoever … shall confess me before men, him will I confess also before my Father which is in heaven. —He that loveth father or mother more than me is not worthy of me: and he that loveth son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me. And he that taketh not his cross, and followeth after me, is not worthy of me. He that findeth his life shall lose it: and he that loseth his life for my sake shall find it.

Blessed is the man that endureth temptation: for when he is tried, he shall receive the crown of life, which the Lord hath promised to them that love him.

Fear none of these things which thou shalt suffer. Be thou faithful unto death, and I will give thee a crown of life.

Our light affliction, which is but for a moment, worketh for us a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory. — Praise and honour and glory at the appearing of Jesus Christ.

Matthew 10:32. Matthew 10:37-39. James 1:12. Revelation 2:10. 2 Corinthians 4:17. 1 Peter 1:7.

His mercy is on them that fear Him

His mercy is on them that fear Him. Luke 1:50

Oh how great is thy goodness, which thou hast laid up for them that fear thee; which thou hast wrought for them that trust in thee before the sons of men! Thou shalt hide them in the secret of thy presence from the pride of man: thou shalt keep them secretly in a pavilion from the strife of tongues.

If ye call on the Father, who without respect of persons judgeth according to every man’s work, pass the time of your sojourning here in fear. — The LORD is nigh unto all them that call upon him in truth. He will fulfil the desire of them that fear him: he also will hear their cry, and will save them.

Because thine heart was tender, and thou hast humbled thyself before the LORD, … and hast rent thy clothes, and wept before me; I also have heard thee, saith the LORD. —To this man will I look, even to him that is poor and of a contrite spirit, and trembleth at my word. —The LORD is nigh unto them that are of a broken heart; and saveth such as be of a contrite spirit.

Psalm 31:19,20. 1 Peter 1:17. Psalm 145:18,19. 2 Kgs. 22:19. Isaiah 66:2. Psalm 34:18.