VIDEO Closer

Oct 28, 2012

Bethel Music, featuring Steffany Frizzell-Gretzinger – Closer, Album: For the Sake of the World, Year: 2012

Closer
Composer: Amanda Cook

Verse:
Your love has ravished my heart
And taken me over, taken me over
And all I want is to be
With You forever, with You forever

Chorus 1:
Pull me a little closer
Take me a little deeper
I want to know Your hear
I want to know Your hear
‘Cause Your love is so much sweeter
Than anything I’ve tasted
I want to know Your heart
I want to know Your heart

Bridge:
Whoa, whoa, how great Your love is for me
Whoa, whoa, how great is Your love

Chorus 2:
Pull me a little closer
Take me a little deeper
I want to know Your heart
I want to know Your heart
‘Cause Your love is so much stronger
Than anything I’ve faced and
I want to know Your heart
I want to know Your heart

A Possum’s Pose

[The Lord] neither faints nor is weary. —Isaiah 40:28

Possums are known for their ability to play dead. When this happens, the possum’s body wilts, its tongue flops out, and its heart rate declines. After about 15 minutes, the animal revives. Interestingly, animal experts do not believe that possums purposefully play dead to evade predators. They faint involuntarily when they become overwhelmed and anxious!

King Saul had a similar response to danger at the end of his reign. Saul “fell full length on the ground, and was dreadfully afraid . . . . And there was no strength in him” (1 Sam. 28:20). He responded this way when the prophet Samuel told him that the Philistines would attack Israel on the next day, and that the Lord was not going to help him. Because Saul’s life had been characterized by disobedience, rashness, and jealousy, God was no longer guiding him (v.16), and his efforts to defend himself and the Israelites would be futile (v.19).

We may be in a place of weakness and despair because of our rebellion or because of the difficulties of life. Although anxiety can steal our strength, God can renew it as we lean on Him (Isa. 40:31). He “neither faints nor is weary” (v.28), and He is willing to reach down and revive us when we can’t take another step. By Jennifer Benson Schuldt

Jesus, You mean the world to me. You
are my life and my all. I’m thankful for
the strength that You give from day to day.
I know that without You I am nothing.

The secret of peace is to give every anxious care to God.

The Blessings of Inadequacies

2 Corinthians 3:4-6

Life is filled with struggles that reveal our human inadequacy: Physical problems leave us weak and unable to cope; relational troubles bring confusion and stress; continual battles with bad habits and addictions make us feel defeated; and financial pressures damage our self-worth. No one likes the fear and frustration of dealing with challenges that are too big to handle, but God can use them for our good.

Maybe you have never considered inadequacy a blessing. After all, it stirs up all sorts of uncomfortable emotions that make us feel insignificant and weak. But God can turn the negatives into blessings if we acknowledge our helplessness, depend on His strength, and step into our challenges with confidence in Him.

Inadequacy can be a blessing since it:

• Drives us to God as we recognize our helplessness.

• Relieves us of the burden of trying to do God’s will in our own strength.

• Motivates us to live in the power of the Holy Spirit.

• Provides an opportunity for the Lord to demonstrate what He can do.

• Increases our usefulness to God by replacing pride with humility.

• Allows Christ to receive all the glory.

• Gives us peace as we rely on Him.

Through the power of the Holy Spirit, believers have the ability to endure difficulty and accomplish whatever the Lord calls them to do. By claiming the adequacy of Christ, we can face every circumstance with a sense of confidence—not in ourselves but in God, who is capable.

Christ: Our Example

“For even hereunto were ye called: because Christ also suffered for us, leaving us an example, that ye should follow his steps.” (1 Peter 2:21)

Some have tried to pattern their lives after that of Jesus simply by asking in every situation, “What would Jesus do?” But in the context of our text, the primary “example” which He left us was nothing less than His own sacrificial death!

Note the context: “For this is thankworthy [same word as ‘grace’], if a man for conscience toward God endure grief, suffering wrongfully . . . if, when ye do well, and suffer for it, yet take it patiently, this is acceptable [also the same word as ‘grace’] with God” (1 Peter 2:19-20).

To follow Christ’s example, therefore, is to be willing to endure unjustified suffering—even defamation and persecution—with grace and patience.

But that is not all; we must also do it in silence! “Who, when he was reviled, reviled not again; when he suffered, he threatened not” (1 Peter 2:23). “As a sheep before her shearers is dumb, so he openeth not his mouth” (Isaiah 53:7).

It is a natural reaction to want to strike back at one who has slandered or injured us, especially if such an act was an insulting response to kindness. But such a “natural” reaction was not Christ’s reaction. He could have called “twelve legions of angels” (Matthew 26:53) to His defense, but He chose to suffer in silence.

And why would He do such a thing? First, if He had not done so, we would have been lost in our sins forever. He “bare our sins in his own body on the tree” (1 Peter 2:24).

Second, He left us an example, that we “should follow his steps.” He was not just silent in His sufferings; “He suffered for us!” If we would really be like Him, we must be willing to suffer quietly on behalf of others, even when they are the ones who deserve it. This is acceptable with God! HMM

Even as the Father hath loved me, I also have loved you; abide ye in my love

Even as the Father hath loved me, I also have loved you; abide ye in my love.—John 15:9 (R.V.).

ABIDE IN ME: These words are the command of love, which is ever only a promise in a different shape. Think of this until all feeling of burden and fear and despair pass away, and the first thought that comes as you hear of abiding in Jesus be one of bright and joyous hope. ANDREW MURRAY.

When love is heard inviting more trust, more love, the encouragement to trust, to love, goes beyond the rebuke that our love is so little, and we take heart to confide in the love that is saying, “Give me thine heart,” expecting that it will impart itself to us, and enable us to give the response of love which it desires. For indeed it must be with the blessed purpose to enable us to love Him that our God bids us love Him; for He knows that no love but what He Himself quickens in us can love Him.

Therefore always feel the call to love a gracious promise of strength to love, and marvel not at your own deadness, but trust in Him who quickeneth the dead. JOHN MCLEOD CAMPBELL.

My feet were almost gone; my steps had well nigh slipped

My feet were almost gone; my steps had well nigh slipped.Psalm 73:2

When I said, My foot slippeth; thy mercy, O LORD, held me up.

The Lord said, Simon, Simon, behold Satan hath desired to have you, that he may sift you as wheat: but I have prayed for thee, that thy faith fail not. A just man falleth seven times, and riseth up again. — Although he fall, he shall not be utterly cast down: for the LORD upholdeth him with his hand.

Rejoice not against me, O my enemy: when I fall, I shall arise: when I sit in darkness, the Lord shall be a light unto me. — He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee.

If any man sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous. — Wherefore he is able also to save them to the uttermost that come unto God by him, seeing he ever liveth to make intercession for them.

Psalm 94:18. Luke 22:31,32. Proverbs 24:16. Psalm 37:24. Micah 7:8. Job 5:19. 1 John 2:1. Hebrews 7:25.

He hath filled the hungry with good things; and the rich he hath sent empty away

He hath filled the hungry with good things; and the rich he hath sent empty away. Luke 1:53

Thou sayest, I am rich, and increased with goods and have need of nothing: and knowest not that thou art wretched, and miserable, and poor, and blind, and naked. I counsel thee to buy of me gold tried in the fire, that thou mayest be rich. As many as I love, I rebuke and chasten: be zealous therefore and repent.

Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be filled. — When the poor and needy seek water, and there is none, and their tongue faileth for thirst, I the LORD will hear them, I the God of Israel will not forsake them. —I am the Lord thy God … open thy mouth wide and I will fill it.

Wherefore do ye spend money for that which is not bread? And your labour for that which satisfieth not? Hearken diligently unto me, and eat ye that which is good, and let your soul delight itself in fatness. — I am the bread of life: he that cometh to me shall never hunger; and he that believeth on me shall never thirst.

Matthew 5:6. Isaiah 41:17. Psalm 81:10. Isaiah 55:2. John 6:35