VIDEO What A Day That Will Be When my Jesus I shall see

Oct 1, 2011

What a day that will be when my Jesus I shall see, And I look upon His face, The One who saved me by His grace!

The Key to the Missionary’s Work (2)

He Himself is the propitiation for our sins, and not for ours only but also for the whole world —1 John 2:2

The key to the missionary’s message is the propitiation of Christ Jesus— His sacrifice for us that completely satisfied the wrath of God. Look at any other aspect of Christ’s work, whether it is healing, saving, or sanctifying, and you will see that there is nothing limitless about those. But— “The Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world!”— that is limitless (John 1:29). The missionary’s message is the limitless importance of Jesus Christ as the propitiation for our sins, and a missionary is someone who is immersed in the truth of that revelation.

The real key to the missionary’s message is the “remissionary” aspect of Christ’s life, not His kindness, His goodness, or even His revealing of the fatherhood of God to us. “. . . repentance and remission of sins should be preached . . . to all nations . . .” (Luke 24:47). The greatest message of limitless importance is that “He Himself is the propitiation for our sins . . . .” The missionary’s message is not nationalistic, favoring nations or individuals; it is “for the whole world.” When the Holy Spirit comes into me, He does not consider my partialities or preferences; He simply brings me into oneness with the Lord Jesus.

A missionary is someone who is bound by marriage to the stated mission and purpose of his Lord and Master. He is not to proclaim his own point of view, but is only to proclaim “the Lamb of God.” It is easier to belong to a faction that simply tells what Jesus Christ has done for me, and easier to become a devotee of divine healing, or of a special type of sanctification, or of the baptism of the Holy Spirit. But Paul did not say, “Woe is me if I do not preach what Christ has done for me,” but, “. . . woe is me if I do not preach the gospel!” (1 Corinthians 9:16). And this is the gospel— “the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world!”

by Oswald Chambers

Letting Go of the Past

2 Corinthians 5:17-19

John Newton worked in one of the vilest businesses of his day—slave trading. But later, after receiving Jesus as his Savior, he penned the now familiar words to “Amazing Grace” as well as these lines: “In evil long I took delight / Unawed by shame or fear / Till a new object met my sight / And stopped my wild career.” Faith in Christ separated Newton from his dark past. The hope of a bright future is also ours if we accept God’s offer of new life.

No sin is so great that God will not forgive. Certainly some sins wreak havoc on our life as the consequences are played out. We will have to deal with whatever fallout our wrong choices bring, but we don’t have to live with guilt and shame. And when there are repercussions, we don’t have to face them alone.

First, we must accept responsibility for our sin. Confession and repentance mean we must drop our guilt burden at the foot of the cross. Only when we are willing to lay aside the sin and its accompanying shame can we take the second step—accepting forgiveness. We could never do enough to earn God’s pardon, so He freely offers mercy to anyone who will receive it. Christ’s death at Calvary bought every person a life free from the weight and wages of sin, but each individual must accept that salvation gift for him- or herself.

Our newfound liberty is maintained by taking a final step: believing we have a new life in Christ. If we will face our sin, accept forgiveness, and look toward the future, we cannot be weighed down by wrongs of the past.

Out of the Ivory Palaces

“All thy garments smell of myrrh, and aloes, and cassia, out of the ivory palaces, whereby they have made thee glad.” (Psalm 45:8)

Psalm 45 is one of the Messianic psalms, quoted as such in Hebrews 1:8-9. The section so quoted (vv. 6-7), which immediately precedes our text, begins with one Person of the Godhead addressing the Messiah also as “God,” whose throne is eternal. Then, He says, “Oh God, . . . thy God hath anointed thee with the oil of gladness above thy fellows.” The “oil of gladness” was the holy oil used for the anointing of priests and kings and was compounded of a mixture of spices which included myrrh and cassia (Exodus 30:22-25). Since the Messiah had been anointed to be “above his fellows” (first as High Priest, then as King of kings), “all his garments” would bear the sweet aroma of the holy ointment.

At the birth of Christ, His garments were “swaddling clothes,” and the gifts of the eastern wise men included a supply of myrrh and frankincense (Luke 2:7; Matthew 2:11). At His death, they gave Him to drink “wine mingled with myrrh [and] . . . parted his garments” (Mark 15:23-24). Then once again His body was wrapped in linen clothes and anointed with myrrh and aloes (John 19:39-40) for His burial.

The psalmist sees Christ (i.e., “Messiah,” both Greek and Hebrew titles meaning “the Anointed One”) emerging triumphantly from the “ivory palaces.” These mansions with their ivory walls and pearly gates are of shimmering white beauty in the distant heavenly city which will someday descend to Earth (Revelation 21:2, 10-21).

The Lord descended once from these ivory palaces to take on human flesh in Mary’s womb, thence to a burial in Joseph’s tomb. But someday He will again come forth, anointed as eternal King, and then “shall the people praise thee for ever and ever” (Psalm 45:17). HMM

Let all bitterness, and wrath, and anger, and clamor, and evil speaking, be put away from you, with all malice

Let all bitterness, and wrath, and anger, and clamor, and evil speaking, be put away from you, with all malice.—Ephesians 4:31.

THE wider vision of the mind;
The spirit bright with sun;
The temper like a fragrant wind,
Chilling and grieving none;
The quickened heart to know God’s will,
And on His errands run.
SUSAN COOLIDGE

IT is of the very greatest moment to know the occasions of our sin, and the way in which it shows itself. To know the occasions, puts us on our guard, to know how our sin shows itself, gives us the means of stopping it. Thus, as to these occasions; one is made angry, if he is found fault with roughly, or even at all, or slighted, or spoken slightly of, or laughed at, or kept waiting, or treated rudely, or hurt even unintentionally, or if his will is crossed, or he is contradicted, or interrupted, or not attended to, or another be preferred to him, or if he cannot succeed in what he has to do. These sound little things when we speak of them in the presence of God, and in the sight of eternity. But these and such like little things make up our daily trials, our habits of mind, our life; our likeness or unlikeness to God, who made us in His own image; our eternity. EDWARD B. PUSEY.

Lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil

Lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Matthew 6:13

He that trusteth in his own heart is a fool: but whoso walketh wisely, he shall be delivered.

Let no man say when he is tempted, I am tempted of God: for God cannot be tempted with evil, neither tempteth he any man: but every man is tempted, when he is drawn away of his own lust, and enticed. — Wherefore come out from among them, and be ye separate, saith the Lord, and touch not the unclean thing; and I will receive you.

Lot lifted up his eyes, and beheld all the plain of Jordan, that it was well watered every where, … even as the garden of the LORD. Then Lot chose him all the plain of Jordan; but the men of Sodom were wicked and sinners before the LORD exceedingly. —[The Lord] delivered just Lot, vexed with the filthy conversation of the wicked. The Lord knoweth how to deliver the godly out of temptations. —Yea, he shall be holden up: for God is able to make him stand.

Proverbs 28:26. James 1:13,14. 2 Corinthians 6:17. Genesis 13:10,11,13. 2 Peter 2:7,9. Romans 14:4.

Not slothful in business; fervent in spirit; serving the Lord

Not slothful in business; fervent in spirit; serving the Lord. Romans 12:11

Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with thy might; for there is no work, nor device, nor knowledge, nor wisdom, in the grave, whither thou goest. — Whatsoever ye do, do it heartily, as to the Lord, and not unto men; knowing that of the Lord ye shall receive the reward of the inheritance: for ye serve the Lord Christ. — Whatsoever good thing any man doeth, the same shall he receive of the Lord.

I must work the works of him that sent me, while it is day: the night cometh, when no man can work. — Wist ye not that I must be about my Father’s business? — The zeal of thine house hath eaten me up.

Brethren, give diligence to make your calling and election sure: for if ye do these things, ye shall never fall. —We desire that every one of you do shew the same diligence to the full assurance of hope unto the end; that ye be not slothful, but followers of them who through faith and perseverence inherit the promises. — So run, that ye may obtain.

Ecclesiastes 9:10. Colossians 3:23,24. Ephesians 6:8. John 9:4. Luke 2:49. John 2:17. 2 Peter 1:10. Hebrews 6:11,12. 1 Corinthians 9:24.