VIDEO Stand Up for Jesus!

Jan 13, 2008

Stand Up! Stand Up for Jesus!

Stand up! Stand up for Jesus!
Ye soldiers of the cross;
Lift high His royal banner,
It must not suffer loss;

From victory unto victory,
His army shall He lead,
Till every foe is vanquished,
And Christ is Lord indeed.

Stand up! Stand up for Jesus!
Stand in His strength alone;
The arm of flesh will fail you;
Ye dare not trust your own.

Put on the gospel armor,
And, watching unto prayer,
Where duty calls, or danger,
Be never wanting there.

Stand up! Stand up for Jesus!
The strife will not be long;
This day the noise of battle,
The next the victor’s song.

To him that overcometh,
A crown of life shall be;
He with the King of glory
Shall reign eternally.

Shall reign eternally.

“It is Finished!”

I have finished the work which You have given Me to do. —John 17:4

The death of Jesus Christ is the fulfillment in history of the very mind and intent of God. There is no place for seeing Jesus Christ as a martyr. His death was not something that happened to Him— something that might have been prevented. His death was the very reason He came.

Never build your case for forgiveness on the idea that God is our Father and He will forgive us because He loves us. That contradicts the revealed truth of God in Jesus Christ. It makes the Cross unnecessary, and the redemption “much ado about nothing.” God forgives sin only because of the death of Christ. God could forgive people in no other way than by the death of His Son, and Jesus is exalted as Savior because of His death. “We see Jesus…for the suffering of death crowned with glory and honor…” (Hebrews 2:9). The greatest note of triumph ever sounded in the ears of a startled universe was that sounded on the Cross of Christ— “It is finished!” (John 19:30). That is the final word in the redemption of humankind.

Anything that lessens or completely obliterates the holiness of God, through a false view of His love, contradicts the truth of God as revealed by Jesus Christ. Never allow yourself to believe that Jesus Christ stands with us, and against God, out of pity and compassion, or that He became a curse for us out of sympathy for us. Jesus Christ became a curse for us by divine decree. Our part in realizing the tremendous meaning of His curse is the conviction of sin. Conviction is given to us as a gift of shame and repentance; it is the great mercy of God. Jesus Christ hates the sin in people, and Calvary is the measure of His hatred.

by Oswald Chambers

The Missionary Question

Romans 10:1-5

Why are people willing to uproot their lives and learn a new language and culture in order to share the good news of Jesus Christ? For the same reason that those who stay at home should be willing to abandon their comfort zone to tell the gospel story to a neighbor or family member—namely, God’s call. Whether we bear the title of missionary or not, we are unable to live in the Lord’s will unless we’re involved in mission work. This universal call is based upon four truths:

1. Man’s spiritual condition. People are helplessly and hopelessly lost without Christ. Although most try to manufacture righteousness through good works or a false religion, they inevitably fail.

2. God’s provision. Knowing man could not save himself, the Father gave His Son in order to pay sin’s penalty. Whoever calls upon the name of the Lord will be saved. This redemption is available to every man, woman, and child.

3. Jesus’ commission. All who belong to Jesus are charged with the responsibility of going and making disciples of all nations through the Holy Spirit’s power (Acts 1:8; Matt. 28:19). The Spirit comes, not to ensure our own happiness, but to make us impactful witnesses.

4. Jesus’ proclamation. The Lord was clear about this: “This gospel of the kingdom shall be preached in the whole world as a testimony to all the nations, and then the end will come” (Matt. 24:14).

Mission work isn’t optional for believers. In Romans 10:14, Paul asks, “How will they believe in Him whom they have not heard?” They won’t unless you tell them.

Peacemakers

“Blessed are the peacemakers: for they shall be called the children of God.” (Matthew 5:9)

In this seventh (out of nine) of the Beatitudes with which Christ began His Sermon on the Mount occurs the first mention in the New Testament of the important word “peace.”

But how can one be a peacemaker? Note that Christ did not say: “Blessed are the pacifists.” There are many today who talk about peace, but how does one make peace?

The answer lies in the example of Christ Himself. He is the Prince of Peace (Isaiah 9:6), and He “made peace through the blood of his cross, by him to reconcile all things unto himself” (Colossians 1:20).

The real problem is that there can be no lasting peace between man and man as long as there is enmity between man and God. “Therefore being justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ” (Romans 5:1). “And all things are of God, who hath reconciled us to himself by Jesus Christ” (2 Corinthians 5:18).

With that problem settled, we are now in a position to become true peacemakers, for we also can lead others to God through Jesus Christ. He “hath given to us the ministry of reconciliation; To wit, that God was in Christ, reconciling the world unto himself, not imputing their trespasses unto them; and hath committed unto us the word of reconciliation. Now then we . . . pray you in Christ’s stead, be ye reconciled to God” (2 Corinthians 5:18-20).

As ambassadors for Christ, we are true ambassadors for peace. The best possible contribution we can make toward world peace, racial peace, industrial peace, family peace, or personal peace is to help people become reconciled to God through faith in the peace-making work of Christ on the cross. “These things I have spoken unto you,” says the Lord Jesus, “that in me ye might have peace” (John 16:33). HMM

Lord, what wilt Thou have me to do?

Lord, what wilt Thou have me to do?—Acts 10:6.

EVERY task, however simple, sets the soul that does it free; every deed of love and mercy, done to man is done to Me. HENRY VAN DYKE.

FOR each one of us, whether on a bed of pain, in feebleness and uncertainty of purpose such as comes with ill-health or over-strained nerves, or whatever else may be our immediate condition, nothing is more urgent, nothing more behoves us than to ask, “What wouldst Thou have me to do?” For, whatever our state, however helpless and incapable, however little service to God or to our neighbor seems within our power, there is no doubt at all as to His willing us to do something. Not necessarily any great thing; it may be only some little message of sympathy and comfort to carry to one even more lonely than we are; it may be some tiny pleasure to a little child, or a kindly word or glance to one whose own fault has cut him off from general kindness and pity; it may be even only in humble patience to stand and wait till He makes His will plain, abstaining the while from murmur and fretfulness; but, in some shape or other, be certain that your Master and Lord hears and will answer your question,” What wouldst Thou have me to do?” H.L. SIDNEY LEAR.

His dear Son

His dear Son. Colossians 1:13

Lo a voice from heaven, saying, This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased. — Behold my servant, whom I uphold; mine elect, in whom my soul delighteth. — The only begotten Son, which is in the bosom of the Father.

In this was manifested the love of God toward us, because that God sent his only begotten Son into the world, that we might live through him. Herein is love, not that we loved God, but that he loved us, and sent his son to be the propitiation for our sins. And we have known and believed the love that God hath to us. God is love.

The glory which thou gavest me I have given them; that they may be one, even as we are one: I in them, and thou in me, that they may be made perfect in one; and that the world may know that thou hast sent me, and hast loved them, as thou hast loved me. — Behold, what manner of love the Father hath bestowed upon us, that we should be called the sons of God.

Matthew 3:17. Isaiah 42:1. John 1:18. 1 John 4:9,10,16. John 17:22-24. 1 John 3:1.

Him that cometh to me I will not cast out

Him that cometh to me I will in no wise cast out. John 6:37

It shall come to pass, when he crieth unto me, that I will hear; for I am gracious. — I will not cast them away, neither will I abhor them, to destroy them utterly, and to break my covenant with them: for I am the LORD their God. — I will remember my covenant with thee in the days of thy youth, and I will establish unto thee an everlasting covenant.

Come now, and let us reason together, saith the LORD: though your sins be as scarlet, they shall be as white as snow; though they be red like crimson, they shall be as wool. — Let the wicked forsake his way, and the unrighteous man his thoughts: and let him return unto the LORD, and he will have mercy upon him; and to our God, for he will abundantly pardon. —Lord, remember me when thou comest into thy kingdom. And Jesus said unto him, Verily I say unto thee, To day shalt thou be with me in paradise.

A bruised reed shall he not break, and the smoking flax shall he not quench.

Exodus 22:27. Leviticus 26:44. Ezekiel 16:60. Isaiah 1:18. Isaiah 55:7. Luke 23:42,43. Isaiah 42:3.