VIDEO How Sweet The Name of Jesus Sounds

Jun 19, 2012

Christian Hymns with Lyrics – How Sweet The Name of Jesus Sounds

Author: John Newton

How sweet the Name of Jesus sounds
In a believer’s ear!
It soothes his sorrows, heals his wounds,
And drives away his fear.

It makes the wounded spirit whole,
And calms the troubled breast;
‘Tis manna to the hungry soul,
And to the weary, rest.

Dear Name, the Rock on which I build,
My Shield and Hiding Place,
My never failing treasury, filled
With boundless stores of grace!

By Thee my prayers acceptance gain,
Although with sin defiled;
Satan accuses me in vain,
And I am owned a child.

Jesus! my Shepherd, Husband, Friend,
O Prophet, Priest and King,
My Lord, my Life, my Way, my End,
Accept the praise I bring.

Weak is the effort of my heart,
And cold my warmest thought;
But when I see Thee as Thou art,
I’ll praise Thee as I ought.

Till then I would Thy love proclaim
With every fleeting breath,
And may the music of Thy Name
Refresh my soul in death!

Pray First

boy piano
David inquired of the Lord. —1 Samuel 23:2

When my husband and I supervise our son’s piano practice sessions, we begin by asking God to help us. We pray first because neither my husband nor I know how to play the instrument. Together, all three of us are coming to understand musical mysteries such as the meaning of “staccato” and “legato” and when to use the piano’s black keys.

Prayer becomes a priority when we realize that we need God’s help. David needed God’s assistance in a dangerous situation as he considered fighting the Philistines in the city of Keilah. Before engaging in battle, “David inquired of the Lord, saying, ‘Shall I go and attack these Philistines?’” (1 Sam. 23:2). God gave His approval. However, David’s men admitted that the enemy forces intimidated them. Before a single sword was lifted against the Philistines, David prayed again. God promised him the victory he later claimed (v.4).

Does prayer guide our lives, or is it our last resort when trouble strikes? We sometimes fall into the habit of making plans and then asking God to bless them, or praying only in moments of desperation. God does want us to turn to Him in moments of need. But He also wants us to remember that we need Him all the time (Prov. 3:5-6).
Dear God, please guide me as I walk through this life. Help me not to act only by my own wisdom, but to seek Your will in every situation. By Jennifer Benson Schuldt

God wants us to pray before we do anything at all. —Oswald Chambers

Our Greatest Treasure

Matthew 8:5-13

What do you consider your most prized possession? A house, car, boat, or cash would likely be high on most folks’ lists. But even treasures and luxuries won’t bring lasting satisfaction—why else do so many men and women keep trading up and adding to their collection? Sadly, in the race to have “better” and “more,” a lot of people overlook the most valuable asset of all: faith.

Hebrews 11:1 defines faith as “the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen”—and this corresponds to trust in Jesus Christ as Savior. Faith isn’t something we can work to obtain; rather, it is a gift from the Lord.

Consider the power that God makes available. In Matthew 17:20, Jesus said that faith as small as a mustard seed—which His audience would have known to be tiny—enables us to achieve the miraculous. The book of Acts shows that the apostles’ belief led to numerous healings (3:1-8; 5:16). And Matthew’s gospel tells us that through a Canaanite woman’s faith, her daughter was freed from demonic possession (15:22-28).

Trust in Christ is more than an avenue to miracles—it is the way to salvation. The Bible states that there is nothing we can do to achieve eternal security in God’s kingdom; we are saved only by His grace, through faith (Eph. 2:8-9).

The best way to move forward is by first receiving life’s greatest gift: faith in Christ. Romans 10:9 says to “confess with your mouth Jesus as Lord, and believe in your heart that God raised Him from the dead, [and] you will be saved.” Salvation and abundant life are found nowhere else.

Power of Faith

“Wherefore also we pray always for you, that our God would count you worthy of this calling, and fulfil all the good pleasure of his goodness, and the work of faith with power.” (2 Thessalonians 1:11)

Believing faith should never be seen as the goal, only the beginning of wonderful growth in the “divine nature” (2 Peter 1:4-9).

Faith both preserves and protects us: Jesus boldly declared, “He that heareth my word, and believeth on him that sent me hath [present tense] everlasting life, and shall not come [future imperative] into condemnation; but is passed [pluperfect or past perfect tense] from death unto life” (John 5:24). “For the Lord preserveth the faithful” (Psalm 31:23). That’s pretty clear. Either those words are accurate or they are untrue. There is no middle ground.

Faith is the “shield” against the enemy: Many of us have read about the great “armour of God” described in Ephesians 6. Of the seven “pieces” listed in those verses, we are told, “Above all [take] the shield of faith, wherewith ye shall be able to quench all the fiery darts of the wicked.” And when we “resist the devil” (James 4:7), we are to do so “in the faith” (1 Peter 5:9).

Faith gives us power for effective prayer: The “faith as a grain of mustard seed” promise in Matthew 17:20 refers not to size or amount, but to the quality. “If ye have faith as a grain of mustard seed . . . nothing shall be impossible unto you.” We might translate that as, “If you have the same kind of faith as a mustard seed, nothing shall be impossible unto you.” The “ask . . . seek . . . find” promise of Matthew 7:7 depends on our confidence in our heavenly Father. And finally, “this is the confidence that we have in him, that, if we ask any thing according to his will, he heareth us” (1 John 5:14). HMM III

Take Time to Listen

The entrance of thy words giveth light; it giveth understanding unto the simple. I opened my mouth and panted: for I longed for thy commandments. —Psalm 119:130-131

The Quakers had many fine ideas about life, and there is a story from them that illustrates the point I am trying to make. It concerns a conversation between Samuel Taylor Coleridge and a Quaker woman he had met. Maybe Coleridge was boasting a bit, but he told the woman how he had arranged the use of time so he would have no wasted hours. He said he memorized Greek while dressing and during breakfast. He went on with his list of other mental activities—making notes, reading, writing, formulating thoughts and ideas—until bedtime.

The Quaker listened unimpressed. When Coleridge was finished with his explanation, she asked him a simple, searching question: “My friend, when dost thee think?”

God is having a difficult time getting through to us because we are a fast-paced generation. We seem to have no time for contemplation. We have no time to answer God when He calls.

Lord, in this increasingly fast-paced, success-oriented life, slow us down and teach us the value of having time to think. Amen.

Christ’s Call: Leave the Old, Begin the New

Then Peter began to say unto him, ho, we have left all, and have followed thee. Mark 10:28

Jesus Christ is a Man come to save men. In Him the divine nature is married to our human nature, and wherever human nature exists there is the raw material out of which He makes followers and saints!

Our Lord recognizes no classes, high or low, rich or poor, old or young, manor woman: all are human and all are alike to Him. His invitation is to all mankind.

In New Testament times persons from many and varied social levels heard His call and responded: Peter the fisherman; Levi the publican; Luke the physician; Paul the scholar; Mary the demon possessed; Lydia the businesswoman; Paulus the statesman. A few great and many common persons came. They all came and our Lord received them all in the same way and on the same terms.

In those early Galilean days Christ’s followers heard His call, forsook the old life, attached themselves to Him, began to obey His teachings and joined themselves to His band of disciples. This total commitment was their confirmation of faith. Nothing less would do!

And it is not different today. From any and every profession or occupation men and women may come to Him if they will. He calls us to leave the old life and to begin the new. There must never be any vacuum, never any place of neutrality where the world cannot identify us as truly belonging to Him!

Running Life’s Race

Let us run with patience the race that is set before us. HEBREWS 12:1

The writer to the Hebrews gives us good New Testament counsel: “Let us run the race with patience.”

The Holy Spirit here describes Christian believers as runners on the track, participants in the race which is the Christian life. He provides both strong warning and loving encouragement, for there is always the danger of losing the race, but there is also the victor’s reward awaiting those who run with patience and endurance. So, there are important things each of us should know and understand about our struggles as the faithful people of God.

For instance, it is a fact that the Christian race is a contest. But in no sense is it a competition between believers or between churches! As we live the life of faith, we Christians are never to be in competition with other Christians. The Bible makes this very plain!

Christian churches are never told to carry on their proclamation of the Savior in a spirit of competition with other Jesus churches. The Holy Spirit tells us to keep our eyes on Jesus not on others who are also running the race!

Lord Jesus, help me to keep my eyes on You as I run the race of the Christian life.