VIDEO Psalm 121 Sung In Ancient Hebrew

Nov 3, 2011

Shalawm!! This is a beautiful ballad of Psalm 121 sung in Ancient Hebrew/ Lashawan Qadash. Every attempt was made to ensure correct writing and pronunciation of this antiquated language. Please enjoy and share. SHALAWM!! QAM YAHSHARAL!!~ RISE YAHSHARAL!!

We’re A Community

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[The Lord] gave some . . . for the equipping of the saints for the work of ministry, for the edifying of the body of Christ. —Ephesians 4:11-12

A pastor’s wife was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. That put the family in a difficult, stressful situation. The pastor wondered how he was going to be able to take good care of her while he still had responsibilities for his church family. But he needn’t have worried because church members stepped up and volunteered to assist him with meals and some of her care.

The apostle Paul wrote to the Corinthian church about the purpose for which the Lord gave them their spiritual gifts. Before he listed the diversity of gifts in 1 Corinthians 12:8-10, he reminded them that “a spiritual gift is given to each of us so we can help each other” (v.7 nlt). God does not give His spiritual gifts for our own selfish use but to serve others, and in so doing, we serve Him.

We are all given different gifts to be used at different times and in different ways. But they are all to be used in love for the “edifying of the body of Christ” (Eph. 4:12). Wherever God has placed us, we can use what He has gifted us to do as we see the need, remembering that we are all part of the church—the body of Christ (1 Cor. 12:13-14).

Thank You, Father, for the wonderful gifts You have given Your church. Help me to understand how You have gifted me to encourage other believers, and to spread the message of Your love to the world.

Use your gifts to exercise care for others.

by C.P. Hia

Seeking After God

2 Chronicles 31:20-21

King Hezekiah of Judah served the Lord faithfully. He was committed to righteous living and intentionally pursued that course for most of his life. He sought God devotedly, and the Lord prospered him.

God wants to be intimately connected with us, like a father and child who share deep, mutual love. Our seeking after Him should be characterized by:

– Wholeheartedness. When we approach God’s Word with a distracted mind or pray with our focus drifting to other topics, we have a divided heart. The Lord desires our full attention; He wants us to keep Him in first place, giving Him priority above everything else important to us (Jeremiah 29:13; Matthew 6:33).

– Diligence. We should have a sense of devotion to God and give careful attention to what He is saying. This requires an unwavering effort to understand how God operates and what He wants us to do.

– Persistence. Seeking the Lord is to be a continual, sustained effort toward deeper intimacy and involvement in His work (Psalms 42:1).

– Confidence. We need to believe that God wants us to know Him—and that He desires the best for us. Trust is an essential component of confidence (Proverbs 3:5).

– Humility. We are totally dependent on God for everything in life, and He is pleased when we approach Him humbly (Isaiah 66:2).

When our hearts yearn for God, He delights in revealing Himself and pouring out blessings on us (Hebrews 11:6). Make an honest assessment of how earnestly you are seeking after Him.

A Time to Sleep

“And when Herod would have brought him forth, the same night Peter was sleeping between two soldiers, bound with two chains: and the keepers before the door kept the prison.” (Acts 12:6)

Here is an amazing thing. The apostle Peter is in prison, bound with chains, heavily guarded, probably awaiting execution (his close friend James already had been put to death by Herod), and “prayer was made without ceasing of the church unto God for him” (Acts 12:5).

Yet, here he is, fast asleep! He had been imprisoned at least once before for preaching the gospel, and the Lord had miraculously delivered him then (Acts 5:17-19), so why should he be fearful now? The Lord was still in control, and there was nothing Peter himself could do about the situation, so he simply went to sleep. There are, of course, many situations where a Christian needs to stay alert and watchful. But there are also times when he has done all he can do, and there is nothing to be accomplished by further worrying, so he must leave it in the Lord’s hands.

In Peter’s case, he was sleeping so soundly that when an angel from God came to deliver him from his “impossible” circumstance, the angel had to smite him on the side (v. 7) to awaken him! In fact, he was still so sleepy that he did not really “come to himself” (v. 11) until the angel left him out on the street alone.

Then, of course, Peter rushed back to the house of Mark’s mother, where the church was praying for him (v. 12), to tell them of the amazing answer to their prayers. As with Peter, there are times when we must simply “stand still, and see the salvation of the LORD” (Exodus 14:13), “so that we may boldly say, The Lord is my helper, and I will not fear what man shall do unto me” (Hebrews 13:6). HMM

Praising God for Miracles

My help comes from the LORD, who made heaven and earth. Psalm 121:2

Among the stories connected to the memory of Francis of Assisi is this one: One day Francis gathered his friends at a remote monastery in central Italy. When he asked them about their journeys, each brother had an exciting tale to report. One had been riding his mule across a narrow bridge that spanned a deep gorge. When the mule bolted, the man was nearly thrown into the ravine. He praised God he hadn’t been killed.

Another brother had nearly drowned fording a river but, he said, “God in His grace provided a tree that had fallen across the water. I was able to grasp a branch and pull myself to safety.” Other brothers expressed similar stories of God’s protection. Then someone asked Francis about his trip. “I experienced the greatest miracle of all,” said the famous friar. “I had a smooth, pleasant, and uneventful journey.”

We should always remember to praise God for His miracles in whatever form they come. He blesses, heals, rescues, delivers, helps, and uplifts more times every day than we can count. We should always be saying, “Thank You, Lord!”

Most high, all powerful, all good Lord! All praise is Yours, all glory, all honor, and all blessing. Francis of Assisi

Recommended Reading: Psalm 121

View God’s Wrath in the Light of His Holiness

He that believeth not the Son shall not see life; but the wrath of God abideth on him. John 3:36

The earnest and instructed Christian knows that the wrath of God is a reality, that His anger is as holy as His love, and that between His love and His wrath there is no incompatibility. He further knows (as far as fallen man can know such matters) what the wrath of God is and what it is not.

To understand God’s wrath we must view it in the light of His holiness. God is holy and has made holiness to be the moral condition necessary to the health of His universe. Sin’s temporary presence in the world only accents this. Whatever is holy is healthy; evil is a moral sickness that must end ultimately in death. The formation of the language itself suggests this, the English word holy deriving from the Anglo-Saxon ‘halig,’ ‘hal’ meaning well, whole.

Since God’s first concern for His universe is its moral health, that is, its holiness, whatever is contrary to this is necessarily under His eternal displeasure. Wherever the holiness of God confronts unholiness there is conflict.

To preserve His creation God must destroy whatever would destroy it. When He arises to put down destruction and save the world from irreparable moral collapse He is said to be very angry. Every wrathful judgment of God in the history of the world has been a holy act of preservation.

God’s wrath is His utter intolerance of whatever degrades and destroys!

Not Ready for Heaven?

My meditation of him shall be sweet: I will be glad in the LORD. PSALM 104:34

I can safely say on the authority of all that is revealed in the Word of God, that any man or woman on this earth who is bored and turned off by worship is not ready for heaven!

Now, I can almost hear someone saying, “Is Tozer getting away from justification by faith?”

I assure you that Martin Luther never believed in justification by faith more strongly than I do. But nowadays there is a deadly, automatic quality about getting saved.

This bothers me greatly: “Sinner, just put a nickel’s worth of faith in the slot, pull down the lever and take out the little card of salvation.” Tuck it in your wallet and off you go—a justified believer!

But really, my brother or sister, we are brought to God and to faith and to salvation that we might worship. We do not come to God that we might be automatic Christians stamped out with a die!

God has provided His salvation that we might be, individually and personally, vibrant children of God, loving God with all our heart and worshiping Him in the beauty of holiness!

Lord, I bow before You this morning as my Lord and King. You are deserving of all my love and praise and worship.