VIDEO Days of Elijah Worship Video

May 5, 2009

These are the days of Elijah
Declaring the Word of the Lord, yes
And these are the days of his servant, Moses
Righteousness being restored
And these are the days of great trial
Of famine and darkness and sword
So we are the voice in the desert crying
Prepare ye the way of the Lord

CHORUS:
Behold he comes
Riding on a cloud
Shining like the sun
At the trumpet’s call
Lift your voice
It’s the year of jubilee
Out of Zion ’till salvation comes

And these are the days of Ezekiel
With dry bones becoming as flesh
And these are the days of his servant, David
Building the temple of praise, yes
And these are the days of the harvest
The fields are all white in the world
And we are the laborers that are in your vineyard
declaring the word of the Lord

CHORUS 2X
Behold he comes
Riding on a cloud
Shining like the sun
At the trumpet’s call
Lift your voice
It’s the year of jubilee
Out of Zion ’till salvation comes

There’s no God like Jehovah (x8–modulate)
There’s no God like Jehovah (x8–modulate)
There’s no God like Jehovah (x7)

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Do You See Jesus in Your Clouds? – Nothing Hidden

sunshine in AM
Do You See Jesus in Your Clouds?

Behold, He is coming with clouds… —Revelation 1:7

In the Bible clouds are always associated with God. Clouds are the sorrows, sufferings, or providential circumstances, within or without our personal lives, which actually seem to contradict the sovereignty of God. Yet it is through these very clouds that the Spirit of God is teaching us how to walk by faith. If there were never any clouds in our lives, we would have no faith. “The clouds are the dust of His feet” (Nahum 1:3). They are a sign that God is there. What a revelation it is to know that sorrow, bereavement, and suffering are actually the clouds that come along with God! God cannot come near us without clouds— He does not come in clear-shining brightness.

It is not true to say that God wants to teach us something in our trials. Through every cloud He brings our way, He wants us to unlearn something. His purpose in using the cloud is to simplify our beliefs until our relationship with Him is exactly like that of a child— a relationship simply between God and our own souls, and where other people are but shadows. Until other people become shadows to us, clouds and darkness will be ours every once in a while. Is our relationship with God becoming more simple than it has ever been?

There is a connection between the strange providential circumstances allowed by God and what we know of Him, and we have to learn to interpret the mysteries of life in the light of our knowledge of God. Until we can come face to face with the deepest, darkest fact of life without damaging our view of God’s character, we do not yet know Him.

“…they were fearful as they entered the cloud” (Luke 9:34). Is there anyone except Jesus in your cloud? If so, it will only get darker until you get to the place where there is “no one anymore, but only Jesus …” (Mark 9:8; also see Mark 2:7).


Beware of pronouncing any verdict on the life of faith if you are not living it. Not Knowing Whither, 900 R

by Oswald Chambers
—-
Nothing Hidden
Hebrews 4-13 Nothing Hidden

And there is no creature hidden from His sight, but all things are naked and open to the eyes of Him to whom we must give account. Hebrews 4:13

The front (obverse) of the Great Seal of the United States appears in many settings associated with the president. The back (reverse) side was never made into a seal, but its design can be seen on the back of the United States one-dollar bill. A distinctive feature is the unfinished pyramid with an eye appearing in glory above the pyramid. Such an image of an eye has been used in history to represent God’s omnipotence and providence—the fact that He sees and watches over all things.

It is certainly a biblical image. The writer of 2 Chronicles 16:9 says “the eyes of the LORD” survey all the earth, while the psalmist says “the LORD looks from heaven [and] He sees all the sons of men” (Psalm 33:13-14). The writer to the Hebrews put it more dramatically: “And there is no creature hidden from His sight”—suggesting that mankind would prefer to hide some things from God. The writer also suggests that hiding is a bad idea since we “must give account” to Him who sees everything.

Today, consider the “everythings” of your life. Is there anything you hope God doesn’t see? Ask God for grace to live a life you will be glad for Him to see.

A man may hide God from himself, and yet he cannot hide himself from God. William Secker

Recommended Reading: Psalm 33:13-22

The Believer’s Passion

2 Timothy 1:1-11

A fire will not continue to burn strongly unless it’s stoked. Similarly, a believer’s fervor, if left untended, can diminish.

New Christians often share their faith passionately and sense God’s joy and peace. Yet this zeal can fade unintentionally. From today’s passage, we gather that Timothy had let his flame of faith cool slightly (2 Timothy 1:6-7).

Believers can experience “cooling” for several reasons. When tragedy strikes, a person may feel that his prayers went unanswered and that God doesn’t care. If he then prays less, it’s easy to drift away from the Lord. At other times, Christians can be sidetracked by the world’s priorities—Timothy’s enthusiasm wavered because of false teaching and fear. Whatever the apparent trigger may be, Satan is the underlying cause; he lures believers away from single-minded devotion to Jesus.

Drifting can be subtle and hard to detect. Six questions can help you assess whether your enthusiasm for God remains strong:

1. Do you have joy in the Lord and a desire to serve Him, share the gospel, and help others in need?

2. Do you spend time in the Word daily?

3. Do you pray, knowing that God is listening and working in your life?

4. Do you faithfully attend church and tithe?

5. Do you experience joy, peace, contentment, and hope in Jesus?

6. Do you stand firm in your godly convictions?

If some of your answers recently changed from “yes” to “no,” your fire may be diminishing. Acknowledge this to the Lord. Ask for His help to fuel your passion.

The Everlasting Covenant

“Now the God of peace, that brought again from the dead our Lord Jesus, that great shepherd of the sheep, through the blood of the everlasting covenant.” (Hebrews 13:20)

This is the only verse in the book of Hebrews that refers specifically to Christ’s resurrection from the dead. It occurs at the climactic conclusion of the book (which had previously referred at least 17 times to the atoning death of Christ) and is associated with God’s everlasting covenant with His people.

The covenant theme is strong in the book of Hebrews. The Greek word diatheke, which is also frequently translated “testament,” occurs more in Hebrews than in all the rest of the New Testament (or “New Covenant”) put together. The word basically means a contract, especially one for disposition of an inheritance.

A number of God’s divine covenants are mentioned in Scripture, but the writer of Hebrews is especially concerned with God’s new covenant (or “new testament”). It is surely the most significant of all covenants.

This new covenant is also called “a better covenant” (Hebrews 7:22; 8:6). It is best defined in Hebrews 8:10-12, quoting Jeremiah 31:33-34: “I will put my laws into their mind, and write them in their hearts: . . . and their sins and their iniquities will I remember no more.” Christ is “the mediator of the new testament, that by means of death, for the redemption of the transgressions that were under the first testament, they which are called might receive the promise of eternal inheritance” (Hebrews 9:15).

The inheritance is eternal because the covenant is everlasting. The blood of the covenant is the infinitely precious blood of Christ, whom God has raised from the dead, and now “he ever liveth to make intercession” for all those who “come unto God by him” (Hebrews 7:25). HMM

Harmony at Any Cost

I beseech Euodias, and beseech Syntyche, that they be of the same mind in the Lord. —Philippians 4:2

Some misguided Christian leaders feel that they must preserve harmony at any cost, so they do everything possible to reduce friction. They should remember that there is no friction in a machine that has been shut down for the night. Turn off the power, and you will have no problem with moving parts. Also remember that there is a human society where there are no problems—the cemetery. The dead have no differences of opinion. They generate no heat, because they have no energy and no motion. But their penalty is sterility and complete lack of achievement.

What then is the conclusion of the matter? That problems are the price of progress, that friction is the concomitant of motion, that a live and expanding church will have a certain quota of difficulties as a result of its life and activity. A Spirit-filled church will invite the anger of the enemy.

Lord, thank You for the many signs that we are alive! Satan must see real life, and I guess that’s a good sign. Give us victory though, that we might not succumb to his attacks. Amen.

Wrong Desires Pervert Our Moral Judgments

Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be filled. Matthew 5:6

Unsanctified desire will stop the growth of any Christian life and conversely, purified desires will tend towards righteousness by a kind of gentle moral gravitation.

In the moral world, right desires tend toward life and evil ones toward death— that in essence is the scriptural teaching on this subject!

Whatever a man wants badly enough and persistently enough will determine the man’s character.

Wrong desire perverts the moral judgment so that we are unable to appraise the desired object at its real value. However we try, still a thing looks morally better because we want it. For that reason, our heart is often our worst counselor, for if it is filled with desire it may give us bad advice, pleading the purity of something that is in itself anything but pure!

When our dominant desires are bad the whole life is bad as a consequence.

When the desires are good the life comes up to the level of our desires, provided that we have within us the enabling Spirit.

At the root of all true spiritual growth is a set of right and sanctified desires. The whole Bible teaches that we can have whatever we want badly enough if, it hardly need be said, our desire is according to the will of God!

The desire after God and holiness is back of all real spirituality, and when that desire becomes dominant in the life nothing can prevent us from having what we want. The longing cry of the God-hungry soul can only be, “Oh, to be like Thee!”

Making Christ Wait

If any man… consent not to wholesome words, even the words of our Lord Jesus Christ… he is proud, knowing nothing. 1 TIMOTHY 6:3-4

First I become indignant and then I become sad when a person to whom I am trying to give spiritual counsel tells me: “Well, I am trying to make up my mind whether or not I should accept Christ.”

This scene is taking place in our society over and over again, as proud Adamic sinners argue within themselves: “I don’t know whether I should accept Christ or not.” So, in this view, our poor Lord Christ stands hat in hand, shifting from one foot to the other, looking for a job—wondering whether He will be accepted!

Is it possible that we proud humans do not know that the Christ we are putting off is the eternal Son, the Lord who made the heavens and the earth and all things that are therein? He is indeed the One, the Mighty One!

Thankfully, He has promised to receive us, poor and sinful though we be. But the idea that we can make Him stand while we render the verdict of whether He is worthy is a frightful calumny—and we ought to get rid of it!

Dear Lord, thank You for Your wonderful promise to receive us just as we are—warts and all. You are entirely trustworthy, Lord.