VIDEO Because of Your Love

Sept 30, 2007

As we come into Your presence
We remember every blessing
That You’ve poured out so freely from above
Lifting gratitude and praises
For compassion so amazing
Lord, we’ve come to give You thanks for all You’ve done

Because of Your love, we’re forgiven
Because of Your love, our hearts are clean
We lift You up with songs of freedom
Forever we’re changed because of Your love

CCLI Song # 4662501
Brenton Brown | Paul Baloche
© 2006 Thankyou Music (Admin. by EMI Christian Music Publishing)
Integrity’s Hosanna! Music (Admin. by EMI Christian Music Publishing (IMI))

Bringing Our Friends to Jesus

Bringing Our Friends to Jesus
crutches on ground

“When Jesus saw their faith, he said to the paralyzed man, “Son, your sins are forgiven.” Mark 2:5

During my childhood, one of the most feared diseases was polio, often called “infantile paralysis” because most of those infected were young children. Before a preventive vaccine was developed in the mid-1950s, some 20,000 people were paralyzed by polio and about 1,000 died from it each year in the United States alone.

In ancient times, paralysis was viewed as a permanent, hopeless condition. But one group of men believed Jesus could help their paralyzed friend. While Jesus was teaching in the village of Capernaum, four of the men carried the man to Him. When they couldn’t reach Jesus because of the crowd, “they made an opening in the roof above Jesus by digging through it and then lowered the mat the man was lying on” (Mark 2:1-4).

Jesus is the only One who can meet our deepest needs.

“When Jesus saw their faith, he said to the paralyzed man, ‘Son, your sins are forgiven’ ” (v. 5), followed by “Get up, take your mat and go home” (v. 11). How remarkable that in response to the faith of the men who brought their friend, Jesus forgave his sins and healed his incurable condition!

When someone we know is facing serious physical difficulty or a spiritual crisis, it is our privilege to join together in prayer, bringing our friends to Jesus—the only One who can meet their deepest needs.

Lord Jesus, we know that You can speak the words of eternal life and healing to people in great need. We bring them to You in prayer today.

Praying for others is a privilege—and a responsibility.

By David McCasland
—-
The Unrivaled Power of Prayer
autum hill

We do not know what we should pray for as we ought, but the Spirit Himself makes intercession for us with groanings which cannot be uttered. —Romans 8:26

We realize that we are energized by the Holy Spirit for prayer; and we know what it is to pray in accordance with the Spirit; but we don’t often realize that the Holy Spirit Himself prays prayers in us which we cannot utter ourselves. When we are born again of God and are indwelt by the Spirit of God, He expresses for us the unutterable.

“He,” the Holy Spirit in you, “makes intercession for the saints according to the will of God” (Romans 8:27). And God searches your heart, not to know what your conscious prayers are, but to find out what the prayer of the Holy Spirit is.

The Spirit of God uses the nature of the believer as a temple in which to offer His prayers of intercession. “…your body is the temple of the Holy Spirit…” (1 Corinthians 6:19). When Jesus Christ cleansed the temple, “…He would not allow anyone to carry wares through the temple” (Mark 11:16). The Spirit of God will not allow you to use your body for your own convenience. Jesus ruthlessly cast out everyone who bought and sold in the temple, and said, “My house shall be called a house of prayer…. But you have made it a ‘den of thieves’ ” (Mark 11:17).

Have we come to realize that our “body is the temple of the Holy Spirit”? If so, we must be careful to keep it undefiled for Him. We have to remember that our conscious life, even though only a small part of our total person, is to be regarded by us as a “temple of the Holy Spirit.” He will be responsible for the unconscious part which we don’t know, but we must pay careful attention to and guard the conscious part for which we are responsible.

“I have chosen you” (John 15:16). Keep that note of greatness in your creed. It is not that you have got God, but that He has got you. My Utmost for His Highest, October 25, 837 R

OSWALD CHAMBERS

The Sunday Rush

Psalms 100:1-5

For many believers, Sunday morning goes something like this: Beat the alarm clock into submission. Oversleep because Saturday’s late-night fun wasn’t compatible with Sunday’s early-morning responsibilities. Crawl out of bed and hit the shower. Yell upstairs to make sure the kids are up. Run through the house, simultaneously dressing children, letting the pets out, eating a bowl of cereal, and making lunch plans with the in-laws. Herd the family into the car. Argue with the spouse, who asks, “Why are we always late?” Screech into the church parking lot. Run through the front doors of the sanctuary. Plop down in a pew. Elbow the spouse, who made another crack about being late. Open a hymnal. Sing some songs. Hear a sermon. Leave church to meet the in-laws at the restaurant. Go home and take a nap.

Sound familiar? There’s obviously something wrong with this all-too- common Sunday scenario: Where is the worship? Sure, this family made it to the service, but the time set apart for praise and study of the Word was just something on their list of Sunday activities. It was something they did because they felt they had to do it. There was no room for an encounter with God, because the time of worship seemed to be an interruption of their Sunday, not the focus of it.

Psalm 100:1-5 instructs us to “enter…His courts with praise.” Does this describe your entrance into worship each week? Remember, worship is not something you have to do; it’s something you get to do! So, plan ahead and prepare your heart, mind, and family to meet the King.

This Grace Also

“Therefore, as ye abound in every thing, in faith, and utterance, and knowledge, and in all diligence, and in your love to us, see that ye abound in this grace also.” (2 Corinthians 8:7)

The “grace” of which Paul was writing in our text is the grace of giving! Many Christians may show diligence and love in their Christian life, but are still very reluctant to give sacrificially to the work of the Lord.

Many follow what they consider the “law of tithing” (most Christians don’t even do that!) and consider this to be meritorious. The fact is, however, that giving for the Christian is not a law to be obeyed, but a grace to be cultivated.

The motivation cited by Paul for abounding in this grace was not the Old Testament ordinance, but the New Testament example in the church at Philippi. Consider, he said, “the grace of God bestowed on the churches of Macedonia; How that in a great trial of affliction the abundance of their joy and their deep poverty abounded unto the riches of their liberality . . . beyond their power they were willing of themselves.” And the real secret of their motivation was that they “first gave their own selves to the Lord” (2 Corinthians 8:1-3, 5). An even greater motive for abounding in this grace is the example of Christ: “For ye know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, that, though he was rich, yet for your sakes he became poor, that ye through his poverty might be rich” (2 Corinthians 8:9).

This grace of giving is thus displayed when one gives liberally (even in times of affliction and poverty) out of wholehearted devotion to the Lord and for the spiritual enrichment of those who are spiritually impoverished.

“God is able to make all grace abound toward you; that ye, always having all sufficiency in all things, may abound to every good work” (2 Corinthians 9:8). HMM

Increased Hostility

Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour. —1 Peter 5:8

As we move farther on and mount higher up in the Christian life we may expect to encounter greater difficulties in the way and meet increased hostility from the enemy of our souls….

Satan hates the true Christian for several reasons. One is that God loves him, and whatever is loved by God is sure to be hated by the devil. Another is that the Christian, being a child of God, bears a family resemblance to the Father and to the household of faith. Satan’s ancient jealousy has not abated nor his hatred for God diminished in the slightest. Whatever reminds him of God is without other reason the object of his malignant hate.

A third reason is that a true Christian is a former slave who has escaped from the galley, and Satan cannot forgive him for this affront. A fourth reason is that a praying Christian is a constant threat to the stability of Satan’s government. The Christian is a holy rebel loose in the world with access to the throne of God. Satan never knows from what direction the danger will come.

Lord, it’s not hard to see why Satan attacks. May I continue to be enough of a threat to him to merit his attention! Don’t ever let me become so anemic in my Christian walk that he doesn’t need to bother with me. Amen.

Sinning in the Name of the Sinless One

Love suffereth long and is kind; doth not behave itself unseemly, seeketh not her own… 1 Corinthians 13:4, 5

Religious acts done out of low motives are twice evil—evil in themselves and evil because they are done in the name of God!

This is equivalent to sinning in the name of the sinless One, lying in the name of One who cannot lie and hating in the name of the One whose nature is love.

Christians, and especially very active ones, should take time out frequently to search their souls to be sure of their motives.

Many a solo is sung to show off; many a sermon is preached as an exhibition of talent; many a church is founded as a slap at some other church.

Even missionary activity may become competitive, and soul winning may degenerate into a sort of brush-salesman project to satisfy the flesh.

A good way to avoid the snare of empty religious activity is to appear before God every once in awhile with our Bibles open to the thirteenth chapter of First Corinthians. This passage, though rated one of the most beautiful in the Bible, is also one of the severest to be found in Sacred Writ.

The apostle takes the highest religious service and consigns it to futility unless it is motivated by love. Lacking love, prophets and teachers, orators, philanthropists and martyrs are sent away without reward.

To sum it up, we may say simply that in the sight of God we are judged not so much by what we do as by our reasons for doing it!

Mysticism Plus Theology

Holy men of God spake as they were moved by the Holy Ghost. 2 PETER 1:21

Christian preachers and ministers ought to acknowledge, publicly and with humility, their great indebtedness to the apostles John and Paul.

Study the Gospel of John and you will concur with me that John is surely the mystic of the New Testament!

Explore the epistles of the Apostle Paul and you will also concur with the assessment that Paul is surely the theologian of the New Testament!

John and Paul were completely immersed in love and adoration for Jesus, the Christ, the eternal Son and the Savior of the world. So we may say that Paul is the instrument and John is the music!

God Himself was able to pour into the great mind and spirit of Paul the basic doctrines of the New Testament. But in John, God found harp-like qualities to sound forth devotion and praise.

Paul, then, is the theologian who lays foundations. John does not really soar any higher than Paul—but he sings just a bit more sweetly! It is not amazing, really, that there is much mysticism in Paul’s theology and much theology in John’s mysticism!

Lord, the theological principles expressed in the New Testament writings are lifetransforming! I pray for all the Christian Bible schools and seminaries around the world, that they will faithfully and accurately present the Word of God to a new generation of Christian workers.