VIDEO Be Thou my Vision

Oct 19, 2011

Be Thou my Vision

1. Be thou my vision, O Lord of my heart;
Naught be all else to me, save that thou art;
Thou my best thought, by day or by night,
Waking or sleeping, thy presence my light.

2. Riches I heed not, nor man’s empty praise;
Thou mine inheritance, now and always;
Thou and thou only, first in my heart,
High King of heaven, my treasure thou art.

3. High King of heaven, my victory won,
May I reach heaven’s joys, O bright heaven’s Sun!
Heart of my own heart, whatever befall,
Still be my Vision, O Ruler of all.

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God is not looking for brilliant men

God ready to use you the is535projuct
“God is not looking for brilliant men, is not depending upon eloquent men, is not shut up to the use of talented men in sending His Gospel out in the world. God is looking for the broken men who have judged themselves in the light of the Cross of Christ.

When He wants anything done, He takes up men who have come to the end of themselves, whose confidence is not in themselves, but in God.”

– Harry A. Ironside –

https://thei535project.wordpress.com/2015/07/07/god-is-not-looking-for-brilliant-men/

The Promise Of Eternal Life

1 John 5:5-12

Our culture is obsessed with longevity. While the desire for a lengthy existence of good quality is natural, it’s also shortsighted. The Bible does emphasize living a godly life now. But it also contains numerous reminders that believers will remain after this old world is gone.

No pill or diet can extend our days on earth beyond the number God has willed. But we can live forever in a flawless home with a perfected body, doing soul-satisfying work. When we believe Jesus Christ is God’s Son and trust Him as our Savior, we receive the gift of eternal life. Believers get to spend eternity serving and fellowshipping with the Lord.

Although followers of the Son of God are promised a place in heaven, eternal life isn’t really about location. The true value of having a soul that never dies is that we are always in the presence of God. For those who reject the offer of everlasting life with the Lord, there is an alternative. We call it hell. The souls ending up there suffer a terrible fate—agony and complete separation from the living God. After death, no mercy or grace can bridge the gap between hell and heaven. The matter must be settled while we are on earth (Heb. 9:27).

Eternal life is irrevocably linked to the person of Jesus Christ. As John wrote, “He who has the Son has the life” (1 John 5:12). Reaching a healthy old age is a laudable goal, but nothing’s more important than receiving the Savior and the gift of eternity in His presence.

A Better and an Enduring Substance

“For ye have need of patience, that, after ye have done the will of God, ye might receive the promise.” (Hebrews 10:36)

Christians have certain heavenly possessions, and this knowledge helps put our earthly possessions and welfare in proper perspective. Evidently, some to whom this was written had been imprisoned, and others impoverished for their faith. “For ye . . . took joyfully the spoiling of your goods, knowing in yourselves that ye have in heaven a better and an enduring substance” (v. 34). Peter called it “an inheritance incorruptible, and undefiled, and that fadeth not away, reserved in heaven for you” (1 Peter 1:4).

These possessions are attainable; they are not in question; they are ours, given to us by the One whose name is “Truth” (John 14:6) and whose Word is trustworthy. We “know” (Hebrews 10:34) this beyond all doubt.

Furthermore, these possessions are valuable. We must “cast not away therefore [our] confidence, which hath great recompense of reward” (v. 35). With this assurance, we are able to bear up under any suffering or persecution that comes our way (see also Romans 8:18).

Knowledge of these possessions is prescriptive, for it helps us cope with longstanding troubles. In our text, we “have need of patience” to get through them and do “the will of God.” “Be patient therefore, brethren, unto the coming of the Lord. Behold, the husbandman waiteth for the precious fruit of the earth, and hath long patience for it, until he receive the early and latter rain. Be ye also patient; stablish your hearts: for the coming of the Lord draweth nigh” (James 5:7-8).

Lastly, realization of these possessions is imminent. “For yet a little while, and he that shall come will come, and will not tarry” (Hebrews 10:37). “He which testifieth these things saith, Surely I come quickly. Amen. Even so, come, Lord Jesus” (Revelation 22:20). JDM

A Mighty Man Was David

My soul longeth, yea, even fainteth for the courts of the LORD: my heart and my flesh crieth out for the living God. —Psalm 84:2

Perhaps David’s greatness and his significance for mankind lies in his complete preoccupation with God. He was a Jew, steeped in the Levitical tradition, but he never got lost in the forms of religion. “I have set the LORD always before me” (Psalm 16:8), he said once and again he said, or rather cried, for his words rise from within like a cry, “My soul thirsteth for God, for the living God: when shall I come and appear before God?” (42:2).

David was acutely God-conscious. To him God was the one Being worth knowing. Where others saw nature he saw God. He was a nature poet indeed, but he saw God first and loved nature for God’s sake. Wordsworth reversed the order and, while he is great, he is not worthy to untie the shoelaces of the man David.

David was also a God-possessed man. He threw himself at the feet of God and demanded to be conquered, and Jehovah responded by taking over his personality and shaping it as a potter shapes the clay.

Because he was God-possessed he could be God-taught….

He sent his heart to school to the Most High God, and soon he knew Him with an immediacy of knowing more wonderful than is dreamed of in our philosophies.

Lord, may I be as God-possessed as David. Give me a heart that cries out to You; then teach me and enable me to know You with immediacy and intimacy. Amen.

Practice Faith and Obedience

For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved. (Romans 10:13)

What is our answer to the many confused persons who keep asking: “How can we know that we have come into a saving relationship with Jesus Christ?”

First, we stand together on the basic truth that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners. A second fact is that men and women are saved by faith in Christ, alone; without works and without our merit.

However, the fact that Christ came to save sinners is not enough—that fact in itself cannot save us. Now, in our day, the issues of believing faith and the gift of eternal life are clouded and confused by an “easy acceptance” that has been fatal to millions who may have stopped short in matters of faith and obedience.

Faith is believing and receiving, as in Acts 16:31: “Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ and thou shalt be saved;” and as in John 1:12: “But as many as received him, to them gave he power to become the sons of God, even to them that believe in his name.”

Nothing gives the believer so much joy as fellowship with Christ

Nothing gives the believer so much joy as fellowship with Christ. He has enjoyment as others have in the common mercies of life, he can be glad both in God’s gifts and God’s works; but in all these separately, yea, and in all of them added together, he doth not find such substantial delight as in the matchless person of his Lord Jesus.

Where can such sweetness be found as we have tasted in communion with our Beloved?

If you know anything of the inner life, you will confess that our highest, purest, and most enduring joys must be the fruit of the tree of life which is in the midst of the Paradise of God