VIDEO He Hideth My Soul In The Cleft Of The Rock

Apr 27, 2012

He Hideth My Soul
From the Album Hymns by Guy Penrod

A wonderful Savior is Jesus my Lord,
A wonderful Savior to me;
He hideth my soul in the cleft of the rock,
Where rivers of pleasure I see.

Refrain:
He hideth my soul in the cleft of the rock,
That shadows a dry, thirsty land;
He hideth my life in the depths of His love,
And covers me there with His hand,
And covers me there with His hand.

A wonderful Savior is Jesus my Lord,
He taketh my burden away,
He holdeth me up and I shall not be moved,
He giveth me strength as my day.

With numberless blessings each moment He crowns,
And filled with His fullness divine,
I sing in my rapture, oh, glory to God!
For such a Redeemer as mine.

When clothed with His brightness transported I rise
To meet Him in clouds of the sky,
His perfect salvation, His wonderful love,
I’ll shout with the millions on high.

Advertisements

What God Doesn’t Need

God Found Gideon Joseph Daniel
So [Gideon] said to Him, “O my Lord, how can I save Israel? Indeed my clan is the weakest in Manasseh, and I am the least in my father’s house.” Judges 6:15

John and Charles Wesley, the fathers of Methodism, were raised in poverty. The mother of the great evangelist, D. L. Moody, gave her son to others to raise because of her poverty. The British missionary-scholar to India, William Carey, was apprenticed as a cobbler as a young boy. David, Israel’s great king, was the least of all the brothers in his family when he was anointed. And Gideon, the judge who delivered Israel from the Midianites, was a weak member of the weakest clan in the tribe of Manasseh.

God seems to delight in choosing “the foolish things of the world to put to shame the wise, and . . . the weak things of the world to put to shame the things which are mighty” (1 Corinthians 1:27). God is not looking for wealth or status or power. Yes, He can use the powerful in this world (like the apostle Paul), but only after they have been humbled (like the apostle Paul).

The fact that God doesn’t need our wealth or power means we all qualify to be used by Him! It is our open hands and hearts that make us useful to Him.

Just as I am, though tossed about with many a conflict, many a doubt, fightings and fears within, without, O Lamb of God, I come, I come. Charlotte Elliott

How To Serve God

Titus 3:5-8

When we encounter opportunities to serve God, we don’t always respond in the way He desires. Perhaps we think we can’t because our schedule is too busy or we don’t feel qualified.

Those knee-jerk reactions slam a door closed before we’ve discovered whether or not the Lord wants us to go through it. You’ve probably never thought of a refusal to serve God as a type of idolatry, but that’s what it is—bowing down to self instead of submitting to Him.

The Lord desires that His servants be willing to do anything—and that they will seek His specific plan for them. He uniquely gifts followers to serve according to His will. But when we’ve already decided what we can’t do, won’t do, or are ill-equipped to do, then we’re acting by our own will. That doesn’t work.

You may serve the Lord as a godly parent, as a factory worker who shares the gospel with coworkers, or as a friend who takes time to listen to the hurting. No restriction exists on what God can do through the life of a willing helper. The strength of His Spirit overcomes human limitations. Don’t have enough courage? God can fix that. Don’t have the right skills? God can fix that.

Laying down our excuses is the wisest thing to do when serving the Lord. Trust that He will empower you to do whatever He calls you to do—and will see to it that you’re properly equipped and trained to do it (Eph. 2:10; 2 Tim. 3:16-17). All He asks is that you say yes.

The Prayer of Moses

“O satisfy us early with thy mercy; that we may rejoice and be glad all our days.” (Psalm 90:14)

This majestic yet reflective psalm is the oldest of all psalms. The superscript of the psalm identifies it as “a prayer of Moses, the man of God.” While we are not directly told to do so, it is helpful to consider this psalm as the dying song of this man of God, as he reflected back on his long life, including the forty years in Egypt, the forty years in Midian, and most importantly the recent forty years of wilderness wanderings. As we survey this psalm, think of Moses pondering his life’s work shortly before he died.

The first stanza of the psalm (vv. 1-2) contrasts the unchanging eternity of the Lord, “even from everlasting to everlasting, thou art God” (v. 2), with the perpetual changes of the recent wilderness wandering in which the people had no “dwelling place” (v. 1). The next stanza (vv. 3-6) notes the frailty of man and the death of a whole generation. But God is the ever-living One; His years do not fail (v. 4). God is also a holy God, justly exercising righteous wrath. The open iniquities and secret sins of all mankind, particularly the people of God, merit His judgment (vv. 7-8).

In verses 9-12 we see the transient, carnal experiences of man contrasted with the permanent, spiritual nature of God. We need to recognize the intensity of His anger (v. 11) and govern our lives accordingly. “So teach us to number our days, that we may apply our hearts unto wisdom” (v. 12).

Perhaps the climax of this psalm is reflected in verses 13-15, where we see the beauty of the Lord our God described as the crowning adornment of human character. The only assurance of the permanent establishment of the work of a man is in its identity with the work of God. Our request of God should be: “Establish thou the work of our hands upon us” (v. 17). JDM

We Are Just Beginning

But when the Comforter is come, whom I will send unto you from the Father, even the Spirit of truth, which proceedeth from the Father, he shall testify of me. —John 15:26

Oh, my friend, we are just beginning. God’s personality is so infinitely rich and manifold that it will take 1,000 years of close search and intimate communion to know even the outer edges His glorious nature. When we talk about communion with God and fellowship with the Holy Spirit, we are talking about that which begins now but will grow and increase and mature while life lasts….

The Holy Spirit is a living Person, and we can know Him and fellowship with Him! We can whisper to Him, and out of a favorite verse of the Bible or a loved hymn, we hear His voice whispering back. Walking with the Spirit can become a habit. It is a gracious thing to strive to know the things of God through the Spirit of God in a friendship that passes the place where it has to be kept up by chatter.

Lord, bring me into a communion with You that only grows richer and more splendid the longer it lasts. Enable me to hear the Holy Spirit, and through Him to know You more deeply. Amen.

The True Son of Man

One like unto the Son of man… out of his mouth went a sharp two-edged sword. (Revelation 1:13, 16)

The Christian message has ceased to be a pronouncement and has become instead a proposition. Scarcely anyone catches the imperious note in the words spoken by Jesus Christ.

The invitational element of the Christian message has been pressed far out of proportion in the total scriptural scene. Christ with His lantern, His apologetic stance and His weak pleading face has taken the place of the true Son of Man whom John saw—His eyes as a flame of fire, His feet like burnished brass and His voice as the sound of many waters.

Only the Holy Spirit can reveal our Lord as He really is, and He does not paint in oils. He manifests Christ to the human spirit, not to our physical eyes.

These are strenuous times and men and women are being recruited to devote themselves to one or another master. But anything short of complete devotion to Christ is inadequate and must end in futility and loss.

Enjoy a living, personal fellowship with Jesus

Beloved, while we do not neglect external things, which are good enough in themselves, we ought also to see to it that we enjoy living, personal fellowship with Jesus. See to it that sitting at the Saviour’s feet is not neglected, even though it be under the specious pretext of doing Him service. The first thing for our soul’s health, the first thing for His glory, and the first thing for our own usefulness, is to keep ourselves in perpetual communion with the Lord Jesus, and to see that the vital spirituality of our religion is maintained over and above everything else in the world.

Friendship is one of the sweetest joys of life.