VIDEO Worthy Is The Lamb, Miriam Webster

worship at sunset
Aug 29, 2010

VERSE 1:
Thank You for the cross Lord
Thank You for the price You paid
Bearing all my sin and shame
In love You came
And gave amazing grace

VERSE 2:
Thank You for this love Lord
Thank You for the nail pierced hands
Washed me in Your cleansing flow
Now all I know
Your forgiveness and embrace

CHORUS:
Worthy is the Lamb
Seated on the throne
Crown You now with many crown
You reign victorious
High and lifted up
Jesus Son of God
The Darling of Heaven crucified
Worthy is the Lamb
Worthy is the Lamb

VERSE 1:
Thank You for the cross Lord
Thank You for the price You paid
Bearing all my sin and shame
In love You came
And gave amazing grace

VERSE 2:
Thank You for this love Lord
Thank You for the nail pierced hands
Washed me in Your cleansing flow
Now all I know
Your forgiveness and embrace

CHORUS:
Worthy is the Lamb
Seated on the throne
Crown You now with many crown
You reign victorious
High and lifted up
Jesus Son of God
The Darling of Heaven crucified
Worthy is the Lamb
Worthy is the Lamb
Worthy is the Lamb
Worthy is the Lamb

CHORUS:
Worthy is the Lamb
Seated on the throne
Crown You now with many crown
You reign victorious
High and lifted up
Jesus Son of God
The Darling of Heaven crucified
Worthy is the Lamb
Worthy is the Lamb

ENDING:
Worthy is the Lamb
Worthy is the Lamb
Worthy is the Lamb
Worthy is the Lamb
Worthy is the Lamb
Worthy is the Lamb

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Chew On It – The Discipline of Dismay

jesus-visits-us
Chew On It

I have treasured the words of His mouth more than my necessary food. Job 23:12

In his book God’s Battle Plan for the Mind, David Saxton studied the Puritan practice of meditating on Scripture and concluded, “The believer must set aside healthy, generous portions of time for personal devotions, prayer, and Bible meditation.”

The Puritans often likened meditation to chewing and digesting one’s meal, and this is a biblical analogy. The prophet Jeremiah said, “Your words were found, and I ate them, and Your word was to me the joy and rejoicing of my heart” (Jeremiah 15:16). Jesus said we cannot live by bread alone, but by every word proceeding from God (Matthew 4:4).

Reading the Bible is like sitting down for a meal, but sometimes we’re like teenagers—wolfing down our food so quickly we hardly taste it. The process of meditation is taking one of those verses or passages, chewing on it, and digesting it in our minds. We think about it as we fall asleep and as we arise. We ponder it while driving or taking our daily jog.

The Word of God is our nourishment, and we should “think on these things” (Philippians 4:8, KJV).

Though God’s people should delight in meditation, the modern high-tech church has almost totally forgotten about this hidden jewel of spiritual strengthening. David Saxton

—-
The Discipline of Dismay

As they followed they were afraid. —Mark 10:32

At the beginning of our life with Jesus Christ, we were sure we knew all there was to know about following Him. It was a delight to forsake everything else and to throw ourselves before Him in a fearless statement of love. But now we are not quite so sure. Jesus is far ahead of us and is beginning to seem different and unfamiliar— “Jesus was going before them; and they were amazed” (Mark 10:32).

There is an aspect of Jesus that chills even a disciple’s heart to its depth and makes his entire spiritual life gasp for air. This unusual Person with His face set “like a flint” (Isaiah 50:7) is walking with great determination ahead of me, and He strikes terror right through me. He no longer seems to be my Counselor and Friend and has a point of view about which I know nothing. All I can do is stand and stare at Him in amazement. At first I was confident that I understood Him, but now I am not so sure. I begin to realize that there is a distance between Jesus and me and I can no longer be intimate with Him. I have no idea where He is going, and the goal has become strangely distant.

Jesus Christ had to understand fully every sin and sorrow that human beings could experience, and that is what makes Him seem unfamiliar. When we see this aspect of Him, we realize we really don’t know Him. We don’t recognize even one characteristic of His life, and we don’t know how to begin to follow Him. He is far ahead of us, a Leader who seems totally unfamiliar, and we have no friendship with Him.

The discipline of dismay is an essential lesson which a disciple must learn. The danger is that we tend to look back on our times of obedience and on our past sacrifices to God in an effort to keep our enthusiasm for Him strong (see Isaiah 50:10-11). But when the darkness of dismay comes, endure until it is over, because out of it will come the ability to follow Jesus truly, which brings inexpressibly wonderful joy.

When a man’s heart is right with God the mysterious utterances of the Bible are spirit and life to him. Spiritual truth is discernible only to a pure heart, not to a keen intellect. It is not a question of profundity of intellect, but of purity of heart. Bringing Sons Unto Glory, 231 L

OSWALD CHAMBERS

Learning To Be Still

1 Peter 4:12-13

Yesterday, we looked at Psalm 46:10, which instructs us to “cease striving” during the difficult times in our lives. That verse means we should stop trying to manipulate our circumstances and instead trust God and allow Him to work. Now, understanding a scripture is one thing, but putting it into action in our lives can be something else entirely. So just how is a believer to “be still”?

First, we must understand that the heavenly Father is allowing our difficulties. If we believe that He is in control, then we must also believe that He has permitted these events to occur.

Second, it may be hard to comprehend, but there is a purpose behind our trials, even when life seems confusing and hopeless. The Lord won’t allow hardships to come our way without good reason.

Third, since there is a purpose for our hardships, they have the potential to ultimately be positive experiences. This doesn’t mean everything will always work out perfectly, according to our own standards, hopes, and plans. But it does mean that if we respond correctly, we may look back on the experience as a catalyst for growth in our spiritual walk.

In Romans 8:28, Paul says, “And we know that God causes all things to work together for good to those who love God, to those who are called according to His purpose.” You may have heard this familiar verse many times. But in order to maneuver successfully through the storms of life, you must understand its truth. God hasn’t disappeared, and He isn’t ignoring us. He has a purpose in everything—even the most challenging of circumstances.

God’s Tear Bottle

“Thou tellest my wanderings: put thou my tears into thy bottle: are they not in thy book?” (Psalm 56:8)

This is a remarkable insight into the tender heart of our heavenly Father. He has a tear bottle—in fact, perhaps a tear bottle for each of His wandering children.

Ancient “tear bottles” (or wineskins) have actually been excavated by archaeologists in Israel. These vessels were used to catch and preserve the owner’s tears during times of grief or extreme pressure. This psalm was actually written by David when he was being pursued by Saul on one side and surrounded by Philistines in the city of Goliath on the other. David apparently not only had his own tear bottle, but also believed that God somehow was also storing up David’s personal tears in His own heavenly bottle of tears.

There is a touching story in the earthly ministry of Jesus that provides another example: “Behold, a woman in the city, which was a sinner, when she knew that Jesus sat at meat in the Pharisee’s house, brought an alabaster box of ointment, And stood at his feet behind him weeping, and began to wash his feet with tears, . . . and anointed them with the ointment” (Luke 7:37-38).

The ointment was obviously not the same as the tears, but followed the washing by tears. Some scholars think these tears came from her bottle, which was emptied on His feet and used to wash them. Others think that those tear bottles that have been found actually contained the collected tears of mourners at a burial site.

In any case, God does know all our wanderings and sorrows and all our tears, and stores them up somewhere. Perhaps it is also a metaphor for His “book of remembrance,” which is being “written before him for them that feared the LORD, and that thought upon his name” (Malachi 3:16). HMM

Full Comprehension Is Yet to Come

And the glory of the LORD abode upon mount Sinai, and the cloud covered it six days: and the seventh day he called unto Moses out of the midst of the cloud. —Exodus 24:16

We know very well that the human mind cannot comprehend or encompass the person of God. We can know what God is not, but in this earthly life it is impossible for us to say, “I know what God is.” We never can know because God belongs to a realm entirely different from ours. The great God exists in awesome wonder. He is uncreated holiness, high above all the things that the hands of mankind have made….

There is neither preacher nor teacher anywhere in the world who can say, “Let me tell you all about God!” God told Moses and Israel, and He tells us: “Always there will be the cloud about Me. Always there will be a veil covering My person. While you are on My earth, you will sense this obscurity, for I Am who I Am!”…

And I can say this from personal experience: After you have known God and walked with Him by faith for fifty years, growing daily in His grace and the knowledge of Him, you will still see a cloud on Mount Sinai. You will still sense the obscurity. Your mind and your spirit will still bow before Him. Your day of full comprehension is yet to come.

I long for that day, Lord, when the cloud is completely removed and I shall know You completely. Amen.

Our Tears of Joy Amen!”

He shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost and with fire. (Luke 3:16)

We need not be afraid of a genuine visitation of the Spirit of God!

Blaise Pascal, the famed 17th-century French scientist and philosopher, experienced in his lifetime a personal, overwhelming encounter with God that changed his life. Those who attended him at his death found a worn, creased paper in his clothing, close to his heart; apparently a reminder of what he had felt and sensed in God’s very presence.

In Pascal’s own hand it read:

From about half-past ten at night, to about half after midnight—fire! O God of Abraham, God of Isaac, God of Jacob—not the God of philosophers or the wise. The God of Jesus Christ who can be known only in the ways of the Gospel. Security. Feeling. Peace. Joy. Tears of joy—Amen!

Were these the expressions of a fanatic, an extremist? No; it was the ecstatic utterance of a yielded man during two awesome hours in the presence of God. The astonished Pascal could only describe the visitation in one word—”Fire!”

“I wish I could escape the wrath of the law!

“Oh!” cries one, “I wish I could escape the wrath of the law! Oh that I knew that Christ did keep the law for me!” Stop, then, and I will tell you. Do you feel today that you are guilty, lost, and ruined? Do you, with tears in your eyes, confess that none but Jesus can do you good? Are you willing to give up all trusts, and cast yourself alone on him who died upon the cross? Can you look to Calvary, and see the bleeding sufferer, all crimson with streams of gore? Then he kept the law for you, and the law cannot condemn whom Christ has absolved.