VIDEO I Know Who Holds Tomorrow, The Isaacs

Mar 18, 2015

Music video by The Isaacs performing I Know Who Holds Tomorrow.

(C) 2015 Spring House Music Group

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Can You Come Down From the Mountain?

man high rock mountain
While you have the light, believe in the light… —John 12:36

We all have moments when we feel better than ever before, and we say, “I feel fit for anything; if only I could always be like this!” We are not meant to be. Those moments are moments of insight which we have to live up to even when we do not feel like it. Many of us are no good for the everyday world when we are not on the mountaintop. Yet we must bring our everyday life up to the standard revealed to us on the mountaintop when we were there.

Never allow a feeling that was awakened in you on the mountaintop to evaporate. Don’t place yourself on the shelf by thinking, “How great to be in such a wonderful state of mind!” Act immediately— do something, even if your only reason to act is that you would rather not. If, during a prayer meeting, God shows you something to do, don’t say, “I’ll do it”— just do it! Pick yourself up by the back of the neck and shake off your fleshly laziness. Laziness can always be seen in our cravings for a mountaintop experience; all we talk about is our planning for our time on the mountain. We must learn to live in the ordinary “gray” day according to what we saw on the mountain.

Don’t give up because you have been blocked and confused once— go after it again. Burn your bridges behind you, and stand committed to God by an act of your own will. Never change your decisions, but be sure to make your decisions in the light of what you saw and learned on the mountain.

For the past three hundred years men have been pointing out how similar Jesus Christ’s teachings are to other good teachings. We have to remember that Christianity, if it is not a supernatural miracle, is a sham. The Highest Good, 548 L

OSWALD CHAMBERS

God’s Financial Plan

Acts 20:33-35

The Lord wants us to make wise decisions that are based on sound biblical principles. But choices that follow His will aren’t always compatible with the world’s way of doing business. For instance, some people may be surprised that the foundational concept of God’s financial plan is to give rather than to save or invest.

Give sacrificially. Typically, when people decide how much to donate toward charity or church, they consider their income versus their expenses and choose an amount that feels comfortable and doable. In contrast, a sacrificial offering can mean that believers follow the Holy Spirit’s leading to pledge resources beyond their means. Initially, some Christians may feel worried about exercising their faith in this way. But thankfully, God has promised that He “will supply all [our] needs according to His riches in glory in Christ Jesus” (Phil. 4:19), and He is totally and completely trustworthy.

Give compassionately. Psalm 24:1 says, “The earth is the Lord’s, and all it contains, the world, and those who dwell in it.” Believers with a generous spirit hold their material possessions loosely and desire to use their share of the Lord’s wealth to spread His blessing to others. A missionary, charity, or pastor does not have to beg them to part with their money.

God’s financial plan differs from any we will see in the world, but His principles have proven to be effective. The Bible and church history show that for thousands of years, Christ’s followers have chosen to give from a compassionate heart and a sacrificial spirit. And He rewards them with increased faith and enough material goods to meet all of their needs.

Christ the Son of God

“And declared to be the Son of God with power, according to the spirit of holiness, by the resurrection from the dead.” (Romans 1:4)

The opening verses of Paul’s epistle to the Romans stressed that the gospel of Christ was actually the fulfillment of that “which he had promised afore by his prophets in the holy scriptures” (v. 2). This promise was centered in God’s eternal Son who had promised to redeem the world from sin and death.

To do this, He must become a man, “made of the seed of David according to the flesh” (v. 3), yet He also must be sinless in both nature and practice before He could become God’s perfect sacrifice for sin. He must be perfect man—man as God intended man to be. He must be a “second Adam,” created without sin, yet He must not fail as did the first Adam, being “in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin” (Hebrews 4:15).

He must, therefore, be miraculously conceived. “A body hast thou prepared me” (Hebrews 10:5)—a perfect body unblemished either by inherited mutations or by a sin nature inherited from His parents. Then, for nine months, His body would grow, finally to be born of the virgin and to live a life “holy, harmless, undefiled” until that perfect, sinless man could be made “one sacrifice for sins for ever” (Hebrews 7:26; 10:12).

But how would the world ever know that all of this was really true? How could lost sinners be assured that their Creator had now become their Redeemer?

By His resurrection from the dead—that’s how! He has been “declared to be the Son of God with power . . . by the resurrection from the dead” (today’s text). Jesus Christ is “that man whom he hath ordained”; and of this we can be sure, because “he hath raised him from the dead” (Acts 17:31). HMM

The Fear of God

The fear of the LORD is the beginning of wisdom: and me knowledge of the holy is understanding. —Proverbs 9:10

A truth fully taught in the Scriptures and verified in personal experience by countless numbers of holy men and women through the centuries might be condensed thus into a religious axiom: No one can know the true grace of God who has not first known the fear of God….

We have but to read the Scriptures with our eyes open and we can see this truth running like a strong cable from Genesis to Revelation. The presence of the divine always brought fear to the hearts of sinful men….

I do not believe that any lasting good can come from religious activities that do not root in this quality of creature-fear. The animal in us is very strong and altogether selfconfident. Until it has been defeated God will not show Himself to the eyes of our faith.

Until we have been gripped by that nameless terror which results when an unholy creature is suddenly confronted by that One who is the holiest of all, we are not likely to be much affected by the doctrine of love and grace as it is declared by the New Testament evangel. The love of God affects a carnal heart not at all; or if at all, then adversely, for the knowledge that God loves us may simply confirm us in our self-righteousness.

Lord, may I not see only Your love without the balance of Your awesome holiness. Grip me with holy fear, that I may truly experience Your grace. Amen.

Instruct Then You Can Exhort

Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly… teaching and admonishing one another. (Colossians 3:16)

The godly men of old through whom the Scriptures came to us were faithful in their exhortations to personal faith and godliness, characteristic of the early church. The apostolic method of teaching, instructing and encouraging was based on solid and
fundamental Christian doctrine. This was Paul’s method in his New Testament letters. First he gives his readers the scriptural reasons for certain Christian actions and attributes. He provides the basis and reason—then he exhorts the readers to respond appropriately.

We do not know if Paul was the human writer to the Hebrews, but the method of exhortation is like Paul’s. We are assured that Christ is greater than Moses and greater than the angels and that He purchased mankind’s salvation.

Then the exhortation: if all of these things are true, then we should keep on loving one another, keep on praying for one another. It is a good and gracious argument: because we have reasons for doing something, we ought to do it without delay and without reservation!

Heaven singeth evermore

Heaven singeth evermore. Before the throne of God angels and redeemed saints extol his name. And this world is singing too; sometimes with the loud noise of the rolling thunder, of the boiling sea, of the dashing cataract, and of the lowing cattle; and often with that still, solemn harmony which floweth from the vast creation, when in its silence it praiseth God. In heaven they sing, “The Lord be exalted; let his name be magnified forever.” And the earth singeth the same: “Great art thou in thy works, O Lord! and unto thee be glory.”