VIDEO The Spirit Of The Living God

holy-spirit-not-by-might
Apr 13, 2016

This song ‘Spirit Of The Living God’ by Meredith Andrews, is from her album Deeper. I do not own anything. To Christ alone be all the Glory.

Here is the lyrics for the song:

“Spirit Of The Living God”

Spirit of the Living God
Spirit of the Living God
We only wanna hear your voice
We’re hanging on every word

Spirit of the Living God
Spirit of the Living God
We wanna know You more and more
We’re hanging on every word

Speak to us

Spirit of the Living God
Spirit of the Living God
We’re leaning in to all You are
Everything else can wait

Spirit of the Living God
Spirit of the Living God
Come now and breathe upon our hearts
Come now and have Your way

Cause when You speak, when You move
When You do what only You can do
It changes us, it changes
What we see and what we seek

When You come in the room
When You do what only You can do
It changes us, it changes
What we see and what we seek
You’re changing everything

Spirit of the Living God
Spirit of the Living God
Come now and breathe upon our hearts
Come now and have your way

Cause when you speak, when you move
When you do what only you can do
It changes us, it changes
What we see and what we seek

When you come in the room
When you do what only you can do
It changes us, it changes
What we see and what we seek
You’re changing everything

When You move, You move all our fears
When You move, You move us to tears
When You move, You move all our fears
When You move, You move us to tears

When You fall, we fall on our knees
When You fall, we fall at Your feet
God, when You fall, we fall on our knees
When You fall, we fall at Your feet

Cause when You speak, when You move
When You do what only You can do
It changes us, it changes
What we see and what we seek

When You come in the room
When You do what only You can do
It changes us, it changes
What we see and what we seek
You’re changing everything

10 Things You Should Know About Pentecost Sunday, The Feast of Weeks

Holy Spirit
Pentecost

Pentecost is a Jewish festival that falls on the fiftieth day of Passover. In biblical times, Jews from all over the Roman Empire gathered in Jerusalem for the festivities of Pentecost. On the Pentecost after Jesus’ resurrection—ten days after Jesus had ascended into heaven—the apostles and other believers were gathered together in one place, when they were suddenly empowered by the Holy Spirit to preach the gospel. They went out into the crowds and attracted attention by preaching in the native languages of all the people present. This created quite a stir. Peter seized the opportunity to address the crowd, preached Jesus’ death and resurrection, and won several thousand converts.

These events are recorded in Acts 2:1-41.

Accordingly, Pentecost is celebrated by Christians as the birthday of the Church by the power of the Holy Spirit. Since the Jewish Pentecost is the fiftieth day of Passover, the Christian Pentecost is the fiftieth day of Easter.

Pentecost is not the coming of the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit made His first appearance in Genesis 1:2! Rather, Pentecost is the outpouring of the Holy Spirit on human flesh to give birth to the Church.

Pentecost derives its origin from the tradition of the Jews. It originally stems from a Jewish Festival called the “Feast of Weeks,” otherwise known as the Shavu’ot. The Feast of Weeks, deriving from the Greek word Pentekostos, meaning “fifty,” occurs fifty days after the Passover, just as we celebrate Pentecost fifty days after Easter.

Pentecost Sunday falls this year on May 15. But many people, including Christians, may not know why the day is special or what is celebrated. Unlike Easter and Christmas, when colorful eggs, Easter bunnies, Christmas trees and Santa Claus are harbingers of the upcoming Christian holidays, there are no such social markers by secular society ahead of Pentecost. For those who need a quick and basic understanding of what Pentecost Sunday is, below is listed 10 things you should know about the holiday.

1. Pentecost Sunday marks the day when the Holy Spirit descended upon the Apostles.

2. Pentecost Sunday occurs 50 days after Easter.

3. The Bible records the Pentecost in Acts 2:1-13.

4. Pentecost comes 10 days after the Ascension of Jesus Christ.

5. Pentecost is also known as “the birthday of the Church”.

6. Pentecost fulfills Jesus’ promise to send the “Counselor” and “Spirit of Truth” in John 16-5-15.

7. Pentecost launches the large-scale spreading of the Gospel after Jesus’ ascension. Acts 2:41 records that after Peter spoke to the crowd after receiving the Holy Spirit, some 3,000 people were baptized.

8. The Pentecostal movement derives its name from the New Testament event in Acts 2.

9. Jews also celebrate Pentecost, but not for the same reason as Christians. The celebration by Jews of Pentecost is to observe God giving the Ten Commandments on Mount Sinai 50 days after the Exodus. The Pentecost in Jewish tradition takes place 50 days after Passover.

10. In Western Churches, Pentecost is usually represented with the color red, which symbolizes the fire of the Holy Spirit.

http://www.christianpost.com/news/10-things-you-should-know-about-pentecost-sunday-96192/

If we go back to the Day of Pentecost, the day the church was born, we will see that God gave us the church to satisfy one of the great hungers of our time — EMPOWERMENT.

Have you heard that word before? It is a current buzz word in our society. Everyone nowadays wants to be empowered. We want to feel that we have control over our lives. We want to feel we can take charge of our destinies. We want to know we can follow the dreams of our hearts. But many of us feel powerless. Some of us are held back by our lack of initiative. Others of us are held back by a deprived environment. Others by barriers in our society. Still, we hunger to believe we can pull ourselves out of the muck and the mire of a disappointing and dismal situation. And the church is the place where true empowerment takes place.

Can we not see that Pentecost is about empowerment? A handful of farmers, fishermen, tax-collectors and housewives became so empowered that they turned the Roman empire upside down. That’s quite an accomplishment. It may very well be the greatest single act of empowerment in recorded history. How did they do it? The answer is quite obvious. And, if we study their example and pattern our lives after it, we will become empowered too.

Pentecost

Seeking Guidance, The Pattern

Matthew 7:7-8

There’s a pattern we should follow in seeking God’s guidance, and the first step involves cleansing. Sin can strangle the Holy Spirit’s power in us and cloud judgment, so we must ask God to reveal and then forgive anything that might interfere with what He wants to tell us.

Of the remaining steps, the most important is surrender. The Lord cannot share His plans for our life until we are committed to following Him no matter what. He certainly knows whether we’re seeking direction in order to obey or merely to consider what He suggests. Therefore, surrender precedes even our request for guidance. First John 5 says God hears and grants our petitions when they align with His will (1 John 5:14-15). When believers yield themselves to Him, they’ll find their way to the right request and the best possible answer.

Most of the time, God guides believers to an answer through His Word, which is why I encourage meditation upon Scripture (Ps. 119:105). Our reading may take us to a chapter that deals with our very situation or to a passage containing an applicable principle. At times the crystal-clear message God speaks to one person’s heart is something no one else would glean from that particular passage. The key is to believe that the Lord will guide you, and to live out that faith (Mark 11:24).

Waiting is important, as the process of seeking guidance can often be slow, and running ahead or manipulating circumstances can be a costly mistake. The omniscient Sovereign of the universe acts on behalf of those who wait for Him (Isa. 64:4). So seek direction and you will receive it—that’s a promise.

Our Weekly Day of Rest and Worship

“And remember that thou wast a servant in the land of Egypt, and that the LORD thy God brought thee out thence through a mighty hand and by a stretched out arm: therefore the LORD thy God commanded thee to keep the sabbath day.” (Deuteronomy 5:15)

It is significant that God’s Ten Commandments are found twice in the Bible (Exodus 20:3-17 and Deuteronomy 5:6-21). In fact, “Deuteronomy” means “the Second Law.” The two are worded identically, with a few exceptions.

The most significant of these changes is in connection with the reason given for obeying the Fourth Commandment, to “keep the sabbath day.” In Exodus, the reason given is: “For in six days the LORD made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that in them is, and rested the seventh day” (Exodus 20:11). Here in “the second law,” the reason given is that God saved Israel out of bondage in Egypt and now was about to enter the Promised Land. In other words, when the Israelites observed each Sabbath day in rest and worship, they were acknowledging God as both their Creator and their Redeemer.

Christians also, as they devote every seventh day as a day of rest and worship, should be remembering God for His finished creation (“the heavens and the earth were finished”—Genesis 2:1) and His finished redemption (“It is finished” was Christ’s victory cry on the cross—John 19:30).

The word “Sabbath” means “rest,” of course—not “Saturday” or “Sunday” or even “seventh” (the word for “seventh” in Hebrew is similar but distinctly different from that for “sabbath”). Most Christians now believe it is appropriate to honor the Lord Jesus (who is both their Creator and Redeemer) to take their seventh day of rest and worship on the first day of each week, thereby recognizing both His finished work of redemption and also His finished work of creation. HMM

Divine Transcendence

Thine, O LORD, is the greatness, and the power, and the glory, and the victory, and me majesty: for all that is in the heaven and in the earth is thine; thine is the Kingdom, O LORD, and thou art exalted as head above all. —1 Chronicles 29:11

The term divine transcendence may sound like something that takes a lot of learning or at least a lot of profound thinking to understand, but it doesn’t. Transcend simply means to go above, to rise above, to be above. Of course, it’s very difficult to think of God as transcendent and also as immanent or omnipresent at the same time. It is difficult to understand how He can be here with us, in us, pervading all things, but at the same time transcending all things. It looks like a contradiction, but as with many other apparent contradictions, it’s not at all contradictory; the two thoughts are entirely in accord with each other.

God is always nearer than you may imagine Him to be. God is so near that your thoughts are not as near as God; your breath is not as near as God; your very soul is not as near to you as God is. And yet, because He is God, His uncreated Being is so far above us that no thought can conceive it nor words express it….

There is a vast gulf… between the great I AM and all created things…. God’s uncreated quality of life causes Him to be transcendent, to rise high above all creatures.

Lord, how awesome that You can be above all and yet so close. I am Your humble servant; may I act according to Your will today. Amen.

Have More Than Religion?

Walk worthy of God, who hath called you unto his kingdom and glory. (1 Thessalonians 2:12)

Contrary to much that is being said and practiced in churches, true worship is not something that we “do” in the hope of appearing to be religious!

True worship must be a constant and consistent attitude or state of mind within the believer, a sustained and blessed acknowledgement of love and admiration. If we have this awareness in our own lives and experience, then it is evident that we are not just waiting for Sunday to come to church and worship.

Having been made in His image, we have within us the capacity to know God and the instinct that we should worship Him. The very moment that the Spirit of God has quickened us to His life in regeneration, our whole being senses its kinship to God and leaps up in joyous recognition!

That response within our beings, a response to the forgiveness and pardon and regeneration, signals the miracle of the heavenly birth—without which we cannot see the kingdom of God. Thus the primary work of the Holy Spirit is to restore the lost soul to intimate fellowship with God through the washing of regeneration.

As our sufferings abound

If Christ is more excellent at one time than another it certainly is in “the cloudy and dark day.” We can never so well see the true color of Christ’s love as in the night of weeping. Christ in the dungeon, Christ on the bed of sickness, Christ in poverty, is Christ indeed to a sanctified man. No vision of Christ Jesus is so truly a revelation as that which is seen in the Patmos of suffering. This he proves to his beloved, not by mere words of promise, but by actual deeds of affection. As our sufferings abound, so he makes our consolations to abound.