VIDEO I’d Rather Have Jesus by George Beverly Shea

Apr 27, 2013

George Beverly Shea I’d Rather Have Jesus – Last Days News Prophecy Update

Rhea F. Miller in 1922 created this song in a poem and George Beverly Shea put the poem to a song in 1932 who played this song on the Billy Graham crusade for many years

I’d rather have Jesus than silver or gold,
I’d rather be His than have riches untold;
I’d rather have Jesus than houses or lands,
I’d rather be led by his nail-pierced hands.

Than to be a king of a vast domain
Or be held in sin’s dread sway
I’d rather have Jesus than anything
This world affords today.

‘d rather have Jesus than men’s applause,
I’d rather be faithful to His dear cause;
I’d rather have Jesus than worldwide fame,
I’d rather be true to His holy name.

Than to be a king of a vast domain
Or be held in sin’s dread sway
I’d rather have Jesus than anything
This world affords today.

No Place for the Devil

Nor give place to the devil. Ephesians 4:27

Boy Scouts, infantry soldiers, and wilderness explorers are required to have a working knowledge of topography. The key root in “topography” is the Greek word topos, or “place.” So topography is the science of place—as in the places laid out on a map. In the New Testament topos is translated “place,” “locale,” or “opportunity.” When it occurs in Ephesians 4:27, it means not to give the devil a place or opportunity. The New International Version translates that verse as “Do not give the devil a foothold.” That works—a “foothold” being a “place” where a climber can insert his foot when scaling a cliff. A foothold was needed by soldiers seeking to gain entrance to an enemy stronghold or fort.

So what gives the devil this place, opportunity, or foothold? Sinful anger, Paul writes in Ephesians 4:26. The longer anger remains in the human heart, the greater an opportunity, the more secure a foothold, it becomes. All the devil needs to get his foot in the door of the human heart is for us to nurture our hurt feelings, anger, or resentment.

Keep short accounts; fill in the footholds; erase the sinful places from the map of your heart. Give the devil no opportunity. If the emotion of anger appears, make sure it has a godly purpose.

Anger is just one letter short of danger. Unknown

When We Feel Frustrated

Philippians 4:10-13

During seasons of frustration, a natural reaction is to blame circumstances or individuals. When we find ourselves hindered from achieving our goals, discontent may be triggered by external forces, even though the root cause often is internal. Then we sometimes make changes—such as quitting a job, ending a friendship, or moving away—in an attempt to spare ourselves further dissatisfaction. But that’s not how to find genuine peace. When frustrated, we must determine the cause. Discontent has three internal roots:

One is the inability to accept ourselves as God created us. The talents, personality, and physical attributes we’ve been given may not be what we desire, but they are exactly what we need to follow God’s will for our life. Dwelling on what we lack or what we’d change distracts us from serving Him.

A second root is a reluctance to deal with our past. We may have painful memories or recall mistakes that brought us heartache. Only when we admit their impact and confront any resulting emotional or psychological issues can we move on in peace.

The final source of frustration is a refusal to deal with behaviors or attitudes that are outside the Lord’s will. Holding on to an ungodly spirit or a bad habit will often lead to the useless practice of repeatedly trying to justify ourselves to our heavenly Father and those around us.

The human solution for frustration—changing our external situations—will fail every single time. The only way to truly uproot our frustration is by relying on God for the strength to grapple with its source.

The Greatest Name

Wherefore God also hath highly exalted him, and given him a name which is above every name: That at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of things in heaven, and things in earth, and things under the earth.” (Philippians 2:9-10)

While the role of the Lord Jesus appears somewhat subdued in the Old Testament, it dominates the New Testament. The Hebrew equivalent of “Jesus” appears only 13 times as “saviour.” The Greek text explodes with over 960 verses either recording statements made by Jesus or proclaiming Him as Lord and King.

King David declared: “Blessed be his glorious name for ever: and let the whole earth be filled with his glory” (Psalm 72:19). And, of course, the great “name” passage in Isaiah 9:6 amplifies the many aspects of the “child” whose “name shall be called Wonderful, Counsellor, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace.”

But Jesus prefers “Son of man.” That title is used 89 times, while “Son of God” is used 53 times. The majestic name of “Lord of lords, and King of kings” is used only three times in the New Testament, twice in the closing book (Revelation 17:14 and 19:16) and once in Paul’s moving benediction: “Which in his times he shall shew, who is the blessed and only Potentate, the King of kings, and Lord of lords; Who only hath immortality, dwelling in the light which no man can approach unto; whom no man hath seen, nor can see: to whom be honour and power everlasting. Amen” (1 Timothy 6:15-16).

Since the New Testament emphasizes the ultimate kingship of our Lord Jesus, we can understand that the dominant name cited nearly 250 times in the Old Testament (“LORD of hosts”) refers to the Ruler of Heaven, the Lord Jesus (Malachi 3:17). HMM III

Faithful to the Discouraged

Faithful is he that calleth you, who also will do it. —1 Thessalonians 5:24

Then there’s the discouraged person. “Faithful is he that calleth you, who also will do it” (1 Thessalonians 5:24). You may have been serving God quite a while, but instead of getting better, you feel you’re getting worse. You know what’s happening to you? You’re getting to know yourself better! There was a time when you didn’t know who you were and you thought you were pretty fine. Then, by the good grace of God, He showed you yourself—and it was shocking and disappointing to you. But don’t be discouraged, because He is faithful that calls you and He will also do it. God will finish the job….

God sometimes makes us wait. He made the disciples wait in Jerusalem for the Holy Spirit (Acts 1:4) and He may make you wait. But remember, God is faithful who called you, and He also will do it. This is our faithful God. I recommend to you that you withdraw your hope from a changing, treacherous and false world and put your trust in Jesus Christ. He is faithful, who also will do it.

God, continue to accomplish that work You began in my life. Even when I feel discouraged, I will rest in the promise of Your faithfulness. Amen.

Our Wills Must Surrender To His

His servants ye are to whom ye obey; whether of sin unto death, or of obedience unto righteousness. (Romans 6:16)

The Christian doctrine of obedience to God and to His will is now largely neglected in modern religious circles, and many in our own congregations seem to feel that our obligation to obey has been discharged by the act of believing on Jesus Christ at the beginning of our Christian lives.

We need to remember that “the will is the seat of true religion in the soul.” Nothing genuine has been done in a man or woman’s life until his or her will has been surrendered in active obedience. It was disobedience that brought about the ruin of the race. It is the obedience of faith that brings us back again into the divine favor!

It needs to be said that a world of confusion results from trying to believe without obeying!

A mere passive surrender may be no surrender at all. Any real submission to the will of God must include willingness to take orders from Him from that time on.

I keep wondering whether the Lord’s ministers will again give to obedience the place of prominence it occupies in the Scriptures.

Return unto thy rest, O my soul

Return unto thy rest, O my soul, for the Lord hath dealt bountifully with thee.” It was at the still hour, when the gates of the day were closing, that with weary wing the dove came back to her master: O Lord, enable me this evening thus to return to Jesus. She could not endure to spend a night hovering over the restless waste, nor can I bear to be even for another hour away from Jesus, the rest of my heart, the home of my spirit. She did not merely alight upon the roof of the ark, she “came into him;” even so would my longing spirit look into the secret of the Lord, pierce to the interior of truth, enter into that which is within the veil, and reach to my Beloved in very deed.