VIDEO Let’s Just Praise The Lord, Heritage Singers USA

Jul 26, 2013

For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. John 3.16

Artist: Heritage Singers USA
Music: Let’s Just Praise the Lord
Album: Let’s Just Praise the Lord
Year: 1973
NUCLEO PRODUÇÕES

The Joy of Slavery

Paul, a bondservant of Jesus Christ, called to be an apostle, separated to the gospel of God. Romans 1:1

The late Charles Colson was a profoundly changed man. He went from being one of the most powerful and feared men in Washington, D.C., to a guilty prisoner to a redeemed servant of Jesus Christ. His transformation was much like that of the apostle Paul who went from being a rising star in Judaism to a servant of Christ.

When radical transformations occur, it is because people understand the nature of servanthood and stewardship. A servant gives up all he has and depends on his master for everything. As a steward, his only responsibility is to be a faithful and obedient servant who carries out his master’s will (1 Corinthians 4:2). Paul put it this way: “But what things were gain to me, these I have counted loss for Christ” (Philippians 3:7). And “having food and clothing, with these we shall be content” (1 Timothy 6:8). The joy of total dependence on Christ as Lord and Master comes from the humility of servanthood.

Every Christian is called to follow Christ as a servant (Revelation 1:1). That means a new mindset: All I am and have is for the glory and joy of following Christ. I joyfully humble myself before Him.

The only freedom that man ever has is when he becomes a slave to Jesus Christ. R. C. Sproul

Praying With Faith

Mark 11:20-24

In today’s passage, Jesus connects two important concepts: prayer and faith. And we know from other scriptures that unless our prayers are united with faith, we shouldn’t expect to receive anything from the Lord (James 1:6-7). But what is the basis for our faith? Are we to believe that God will give us whatever we ask?

Jesus began by saying, “Have faith in God” (Mark 11:22). This is the foundation for prayer—trust in the Lord. If our requests are incompatible with His teachings, we have no reason to believe He’ll answer. Nor should we expect to receive if the motive is our own pleasure (James 4:3). As Jesus’ prayer in the Garden of Gethsemane demonstrates, ultimate trust in God says, “Yet not My will, but Yours be done” (Luke 22:42).

First John 5:14-15 tells us we can count on God answering requests prayed according to His will. Our prayers should, therefore, be anchored to Scripture because apart from the Bible, we don’t know His will. But as we fill our minds with God’s Word, our desires and requests begin to align with His. When that’s the case, we can confidently expect to receive whatever we ask. And in those instances when we’re not sure of His will, the Spirit intercedes for us (Rom. 8:27). Even the obstacles in our life are no problem for the Lord. Nothing in harmony with His purpose will be impossible for us.

God doesn’t turn a deaf ear to the supplication of His children. As a loving heavenly Father, He protects, provides, guides, and cares for us. He has proven His love by sending His Son. Surely we can trust Him with all our other concerns.

Our Umpire in Heaven

“For he is not a man, as I am, that I should answer him, and we should come together in judgment. Neither is there any daysman betwixt us, that might lay his hand upon us both.” (Job 9:32-33)

Job, in his sufferings, was mystified by the complete silence of God, whom he had loved and tried to serve faithfully all his life. He longed somehow to be able to come before the great Judge to plead his case, but this was not possible, for God was not a man like himself. He did not even have a “daysman” to mediate between himself and God.

Oh, yes, he did! And so do we. A “daysman” is an arbitrator or umpire, or mediator (as this word is usually rendered in modern versions). But how could there be an umpire to mediate disputes between God and man, unless such an umpire could somehow be both God and man, able to “lay his hand upon us both”?

There is one perfect umpire, of course. “For there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus; Who gave himself a ransom for all, to be testified in due time” (1 Timothy 2:5-6). The ransom He paid was His own blood, with which “he entered in once [for all] into the holy place, having obtained eternal redemption for us” (Hebrews 9:12).

Thus, the God/man Christ Jesus is perfectly able to bridge the chasm between God and man. Perhaps an even better connotation of “daysman” is that of “advocate.” Now, when Satan, “the accuser of our brethren” (Revelation 12:10), accuses us of sin before God, as he did against Job, our great Intercessor defends us. “If any man sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous” (1 John 2:1), and “he is able also to save them to the uttermost that come unto God by him, seeing he ever liveth to make intercession for them” (Hebrews 7:25). HMM

The Program Instead of the Presence

And with great power gave the apostles witness of the resurrection of the Lord Jesus: and great grace was upon them all. —Acts 4:33

Now, I freely admit that it is impossible to hold a Christian service without an agenda. If order is to be maintained, an order of service must exist somewhere. If two songs are to be sung, someone must know which one is to be sung first, and whether this knowledge is only in someone’s head or has been reduced to paper, there is indeed a “program,” however we may dislike to call it that. The point we make here is that in our times the program has been substituted for the Presence. The program rather than the Lord of glory is the center of attraction.

So the most popular gospel church in any city is likely to be the one that offers the most interesting program; that is, the church that can present the most and best features for the enjoyment of the public. These features are programmed so as to keep everything moving and everybody expectant….

We’ll do our churches a lot of good if we each one seek to cultivate the blessed Presence in our services. If we make Christ the supreme and constant object of devotion the program will take its place as a gentle aid to order in the public worship of God. If we fail to do this the program will finally obscure the Light entirely. And no church can afford that.

Like the apostles, Lord, I want to see the resurrected Christ in all His glory. Help us to focus not on the program of our worship but on the Lord of glory who is the object of our worship. Amen.

Authority in Your Preaching

Preach the word; be instant in season, out of season; reprove, rebuke, exhort with all
longsuffering and doctrine.
(2 Timothy 4:2)

Because we are Christians who believe the inspired Word of God and because we believe that the Holy Spirit is the abiding third person of the Trinity, there should be more divine authority in our preaching ministries.

A preacher of this gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ should have the authority of God upon him, so that he makes the people responsible to listen to him. When they will not listen to him, they are accountable to God for turning away from the divine Word.

A preacher under God’s unction should reign from his pulpit as a king from his throne. He should not reign by law or by regulation or by man’s authority. He ought to reign by moral ascendancy!

The divine authority is missing from many pulpits. We have “tabby cats” with their claws carefully trimmed in the seminary, so they can paw over the congregations and never scratch them at all! The Holy Spirit will sharpen the arrows of the man of God who preaches the whole counsel of God!

God has clearly revealed that

“I said not unto the seed of Jacob, Seek ye me in vain.”—Isaiah xlv. 19.

God has clearly revealed that He will hear the prayer of those who call upon him, and that
declaration cannot be contravened. He was so firmly, so truthfully, so righteously spoken, that there can be no room for doubt. He does not reveal his mind in unintelligible words, but he speaks plainly and positively, “Ask, and ye shall receive.” Believe, O trembler, this sure truth—that prayer must and shall be heard, and that never, even in the secrets of eternity, has the Lord said unto any living soul, “Seek ye Me in vain.”