VIDEO Names Of God To Call Upon

Image result for names of god

As we call upon the Lord in our times of need or even brokenness, let us remember that He is ALL things and has all these different Names for His different characteristics. Whether it’s healing or provision that you need, you can call upon His Name!!

Elohim (Creator God)

Jehovah Shammah (The Lord Is There)

Adonai (Lord, Master)

El Elyon (The Most High God)

Yahweh (Lord, Jehovah, I AM)

Jehovah-Raah (The Lord My Shepherd)

Jehovah Mekoddishkem (The Lord Who Sanctifies You)

Jehovah Tsidkenu (The Lord Our Righteousness)

El Roi (The God Who Sees)

Jehovah Nissi (The Lord My Banner)

El Shaddai (Lord God Almighty, All Sufficient One)

Jehovah Jireh (The Lord Will Provide)

Jehovah Rapha (The Lord That Heals)

Jehovah Shalom (The Lord Is Peace)

Jehovah Sabaoth (The Lord of Hosts)

El Olam (The Everlasting God)

El (The Strong One)

Jehovah (I AM)
===================

 https://secretangelps911.wordpress.com/2018/01/12/names-of-god-to-call-upon/
Advertisements

Fitting In

Then those who feared the Lord talked with each other, and the Lord listened and heard. Malachi 3:16

Lee is a diligent and reliable bank employee. Yet he often finds himself sticking out like a sore thumb for living out his faith. This reveals itself in practical ways, such as when he leaves the break room during an inappropriate conversation. At a Bible study, he shared with his friends, “I fear that I’m losing promotion opportunities for not fitting in.”

Believers during the prophet Malachi’s time faced a similar challenge. They had returned from exile and the temple had been rebuilt, but there was skepticism about God’s plan for their future. Some of the Israelites were saying, “It is futile to serve God. What do we gain by carrying out his requirements . . . ? But now we call the arrogant blessed. Certainly evildoers prosper, and even when they put God to the test, they get away with it” (Malachi 3:14–15).

Lord, help us to keep on encouraging one another to stay faithful to You in this faithless world.

How can we stand firm for God in a culture that tells us we will lose out if we don’t blend in? The faithful in Malachi’s time responded to that challenge by meeting with like-minded believers to encourage each other. Malachi shares this important detail with us: “The Lord listened and heard” (v. 16).

God notices and cares for all who fear and honor Him. He doesn’t call us to “fit in” but to draw closer to Him each day as we encourage each other. Let’s stay faithful!

Lord, help us to keep on encouraging one another to stay faithful to You in this faithless world.

 

 

Our faith may be tested so that we may trust God’s faithfulness.

By Poh Fang Chia 

INSIGHT

Malachi’s prophecy is a fitting conclusion to the Old Testament. (Malachi may not have been his actual name since it means “My messenger,” which is more a title than a name.) The prophecy challenges Israel’s condition following their return from exile and anticipates their coming Messiah. Chapters 1–2 give a series of rebukes for the waywardness of God’s people, leading to the declaration, “You have wearied the Lord with your words” (2:17). In response to Israel’s spiritual drifting, God reaches out with a promise for their rescue. Malachi 3:1 says, “ ‘I will send my messenger, who will prepare the way before me. Then suddenly the Lord you are seeking will come to his temple; the messenger of the covenant, whom you desire, will come,’ says the Lord Almighty.” That messenger was John the Baptist who prepared the way for Jesus—Israel’s long-hoped-for Messiah (Matthew 11:10). Even when we are faithless, our God is faithful!

How does God’s faithfulness encourage you to be faithful?

Check out the free online course “Haggai-Malachi: No Substitute for Obedience” at christianuniversity.org/HAGGAI-MALACHI.

Bill Crowder

Expectation of Suffering

Philippians 1:27-30

One of the greatest gifts we can give new believers is the knowledge of what they can expect in the Christian life. After receiving the forgiveness of sins and being made new creations in Jesus Christ, they might expect that life will be wonderful from that point forward. And indeed, it is because we have the Holy Spirit and Christ’s peace and joy within us. However, there is also the potential for suffering.

Christ saved us from sin, not from trouble. All the pain, suffering, hardship, and problems in the world originated in the Garden of Eden, with Adam and Eve’s transgression. From then on, mankind has lived in a fallen environment and in personal bondage to sin. Christ set us free from the guilt and penalty of our wrongdoing, but He has not exempted us from the pain and trouble that is common to man.

In fact, once we believe in Christ, an additional area of trouble becomes possible in our life: suffering for Christ’s sake. We’d like to think that everyone around us will be just as excited about Jesus’ offer of salvation as we are. But in reality, there are many opponents to the gospel. At times family members may disparage or reject us and people at work make fun of us. In some areas of the world, believers suffer physical and even fatal persecution.

So what are we to do, and how are we to behave? When the world stands against us, we desperately need the fellowship and encouragement of the church. Together, we conduct ourselves in a manner worthy of the gospel, stand firm in one spirit, and strive together for the faith.

Things We Know

“And when the chief Shepherd shall appear, ye shall receive a crown of glory that fadeth not away.” (1 Peter 5:4)

In these days of relativism, situational ethics, and changing mores, it does a Christian good to note the many things in Scripture we can know, things we can count on, things that do not change. Following is a sampling of such truths, with little comment, intended to encourage the reader to extend the list, perhaps as an ongoing project.

We can know that Christ is God: “I and my Father are one” (John 10:30).

We can know that we are saved: “He that believeth on me hath everlasting life” (John 6:47).

We can know we are His dear children: “Beloved, now are we the sons of God” (1 John 3:2).

We can know His protection: “And they shall never perish, neither shall any man pluck them out of my hand” (John 10:28).

We can know He answers prayer: “If ye shall ask any thing in my name, I will do it” (John 14:14).

We can know He will help us through temptation: “In that he himself hath suffered being tempted, he is able to succour them that are tempted” (Hebrews 2:18).

We can know how we should act: “For I have given you an example, that ye should do as I have done” (John 13:15).

We can know He desires us to speak on His behalf: “Be ready always to give an answer to every man that asketh you a reason of the hope that is in you” (1 Peter 3:15).

We can know that He will come again: “I will come again, and receive you unto myself; that where I am, there ye may be also” (John 14:3).

We can know of our eternal rewards, as in today’s verse: “An inheritance incorruptible, and undefiled, and that fadeth not away, reserved in heaven for you” (1 Peter 1:4). JDM

Whereon do ye trust?

2 Chronicles 32:1-3, 5-12, 14, 16, 17, 19, 20

2 Chronicles 32:1

Notwithstanding the glorious reformation made by Hezekiah, he and his people must be tried; the trial became a test of their faith, and an opportunity for the Lord to shew himself strong on their behalf They were none the less approved of God because they were tried: good trees are pruned because they are good, and in order to make them better.

2 Chronicles 32:2, 3

To a vast host the want of water would be a great peril, hence the wisdom of cutting off the supplies in the region which Sennacherib would traverse. Faith is near akin to common sense.

2 Chronicles 32:5

Here again were commonsense preparations: faith trusts in God, but repairs her bulwarks.

2 Chronicles 32:6-8

They were inspired with confidence by their leader’s heroic language; and shall not we, the soldiers of Christ, be cheered by that which he has spoken—”Let not your hearts be troubled”?

2 Chronicles 32:9-12

The tyrant king treated Hezekiah meanly by appealing to his people to revolt from him and look to their own interests; charging him with deceiving them, and with profanity inputting an end to the unlawful worship upon the high places. Hezekiah’s greatest virtue is here mentioned as a crime, so common is it for saints to be misrepresented by sinners.

2 Chronicles 32:14

He spake exceeding proudly, as if he regarded Jehovah as inferior to the idols whose worshippers he had vanquished. The Lord would surely be moved to jealousy by such taunts.

2 Chronicles 32:16, 17

Writing is deliberate, and therefore doubly profane. It was well for Hezekiah to have so foul-mouthed an enemy, for his insolent blasphemies stirred up the indignation of the Lord.

2 Chronicles 32:20

Deliverance was not far off when king and prophet both cried to heaven. Is any troubled, or in fear of trouble? Let him pray.

 

Dealing with Our Sin

For the wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life. (Romans 6:23)

Many evangelical teachers insist so strongly upon free, unconditional grace as to create the impression that sin is not a serious matter and that God cares very little about it!

They make it seem that God is only concerned with our escaping the consequences.

The gospel, then, in practical application, means little more than a way to escape the fruits of our past!

But the heart that has felt the weight of its own sin and has seen the dread whiteness of the Most High God will never believe that a message of forgiveness without transformation is a message of good news. To remit a man’s past without transforming his present is to violate the moral sincerity of his own heart.

To that kind of thing God will be no party! For to offer a sinner the gift of salvation based upon the work of Christ, while at the same time allowing him to retain the idea that the gift carries with it no moral implications, is to do him untold injury where it hurts him most!

 

Love Unto the End

“For the Lord will not cast off for ever.” Lam. 3:31

He may cast away for a season, but not for ever.

A woman may leave off her ornaments for a few days, but she will not forget them, nor throw them upon the dunghill. It is not like the Lord to cast off those whom He loves: for, “having loved his own which were in the world, he loved them unto the end.” Some talk of our being in grace and out of it, as if we were like rabbits that run in and out of their burrows: but, indeed, it is not so. The Lord’s love is a far more serious and abiding matter than this.

He chose us from eternity, and He will love us throughout eternity. He loved us so as to die for us, and we may therefore be sure that His love will never die. His honor is so wrapped up in the salvation of the believer, that He can no more cast him off than He can cast off His own robes of office as King of glory. No, no! The Lord Jesus, as a Head, never casts off His members; as a Husband, He never casts off His bride.

Did you think you were cast off? Why did you think so evil of the Lord who has betrothed you to Himself? Cast off such thoughts, and never let them lodge in your soul again. “The Lord hath not cast away his people which he foreknew” (Rom. 11:2). “He hateth putting away” (Mal. 2:16).

 

%d bloggers like this: