Landmine of Compromise

1 Kings 11:1-7

Compromise is so insidious that people often do not even realize when they have stepped on this landmine. There are many instances of good compromise, like two opposing sides coming together through mutual conciliation. But if concessions mean that we believe or act unwisely, then we are in danger. Unfortunately, such unhealthy compromise leads to disappointment and ultimately to destruction.

We do not fall into a life of compromise; rather, we slide into it. King Solomon is a perfect example of how a small compromise can lead to destruction. God clearly tells Solomon not to associate with other nations or make alliances with them. So although getting horses from Egypt seems innocent, it is actually a compromise. What’s more, Solomon also makes an alliance and marries Pharaoh’s daughter. Then he compromises further until he has hundreds of wives. Next, he allows others to worship idols, but soon he himself is involved in the practice too. He finally stoops so low as to build a high place for “Molech the detestable idol of the sons of Ammon” (1 Kings 11:7), whose worship was associated with child sacrifice. This is a horrible picture of the way compromise works.

The principle is the same in our life: A little compromise can lead to complete ruin. People give in to pressure in many different areas—morals, godly principles, clothing style, or participation in gossip or flirtatious conversations. Tomorrow we will look at the nature of compromise as well as some reasons that people yield. We will also see the characteristics of a non-compromiser.

2 thoughts on “Landmine of Compromise

  1. Pingback: The Weekly Headlines – My Daily Musing

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