VIDEO Inner Invincibility

Inner Invincibility

“Whom the Lord loves He chastens…” (Hebrews 12:6). How petty our complaining is! Our Lord begins to bring us to the point where we can have fellowship with Him, only to hear us moan and groan, saying, “Oh Lord, just let me be like other people!” Jesus is asking us to get beside Him and take one end of the yoke, so that we can pull together. That’s why Jesus says to us, “My yoke is easy and My burden is light” (Matthew 11:30). Are you closely identified with the Lord Jesus like that? If so, you will thank God when you feel the pressure of His hand upon you.

“…to those who have no might He increases strength” (Isaiah 40:29). God comes and takes us out of our emotionalism, and then our complaining turns into a hymn of praise. The only way to know the strength of God is to take the yoke of Jesus upon us and to learn from Him.

“…the joy of the Lord is your strength” (Nehemiah 8:10). Where do the saints get their joy? If we did not know some Christians well, we might think from just observing them that they have no burdens at all to bear. But we must lift the veil from our eyes. The fact that the peace, light, and joy of God is in them is proof that a burden is there as well. The burden that God places on us squeezes the grapes in our lives and produces the wine, but most of us see only the wine and not the burden. No power on earth or in hell can conquer the Spirit of God living within the human spirit; it creates an inner invincibility.

If your life is producing only a whine, instead of the wine, then ruthlessly kick it out. It is definitely a crime for a Christian to be weak in God’s strength.

WISDOM FROM OSWALD CHAMBERS

There is no condition of life in which we cannot abide in Jesus. We have to learn to abide in Him wherever we are placed. Our Brilliant Heritage


Matthew 11:29-30 Bible teaching

Into Our Storms

He got up, rebuked the wind and said to the waves, “Quiet! Be still!” Then the wind died down and it was completely calm. Mark 4:39

Wind howled, lightning flashed, waves crashed. I thought I was going to die. My grandparents and I were fishing on a lake, but we’d stayed out too long. As the sun set, a fast-moving squall swept over our small boat. My grandfather instructed me to sit in front to keep it from capsizing. Terror flooded my heart. But then, somehow, I began to pray. I was fourteen.

I asked God for His reassurance and protection. The storm didn’t weaken, but we made it to shore. To this day, I don’t know if I’ve experienced a deeper certainty of God’s presence than that night in the storm.

What storm do you face today? Turn to Him knowing who He is and what His power can do.

Jesus is no stranger to storms. In Mark 4:35–41, He told His disciples to head across a lake that would soon turn windy and wild. The storm that night tested and bested these rugged fishermen. They too thought they were going to die. But Jesus calmed the water and then led His disciples to deeper faith.

Likewise, Jesus invites us to trust Him in our storms. Sometimes He miraculously stills the winds and the waves. Sometimes He does something equally miraculous: He steadies our hearts and helps us to trust Him. He asks us to rest in the belief that He has the power to say to the waves, “Quiet! Be still!”

Lord, the storms of our lives sometimes seem like they will swamp us. Help us trust that You are the Master of the storm, to place our faith in You when life’s winds blow fiercely.

No danger can come so near that God is not nearer still.

By Adam Holz

INSIGHT

The end of Mark 4 poses an interesting question that each of us must answer: Who is this man? The disciples asked this question after Christ spoke to the wind and the waves and they obeyed Him. Though we may think this was merely a response of astonishment at what Jesus had just accomplished, Mark wants us to take the question seriously because he wants to present the answer.

Immediately following the disciples’ question, Mark recounts three stories that are meant to fill in the answer. After the miracle of calming the storm, Jesus casts demons out of a possessed man (5:1–20), heals a woman who had been bleeding for twelve years (vv. 21–34), and raises a girl from the dead (vv. 35–43).

Who is Jesus? He is God in the flesh, the one with power over nature, the spirit world, our bodies, and power over death itself. There is nothing we face that is beyond His ability to command.

What storm do you face today? Turn to Him knowing who He is and what His power can do.

J.R. Hudberg

Living in God’s Favor

Exodus 33:12-17

What comes to mind when you hear the word favor? While we use the term in a variety of ways—such as doing something to help a person or showing honor in some way—the biblical meaning is to show kindness or acceptance. As believers, we have experienced God’s favor toward us as a result of our salvation. But God’s favor also works in us and changes us.

Moses was a man who found favor with God, and consequently, his life and desires were changed.

Moses wanted to know God’s ways in order to know God (Ex. 33:12-13). Through Scripture, we discover how the Lord operates in people’s lives, what He desires, and how He works out His will in human history. As a result, we gain a deeper understanding of God and a greater love for Him.

Moses desired God’s presence (Ex. 33:15). When the Israelites sinned by worshipping a golden calf, God said that though He would send His angel before them into the Promised Land, He would not go with them (Ex. 33:1-3). But Moses didn’t want divine protection and provision apart from the Lord’s presence.

Moses wanted God’s favor to be a witness to others (Ex. 33:16). What made Israel a distinctive and blessed nation was their God. Without Him, they would be like any other people on the earth.

We must not only fight the tendency to take God’s favor for granted; we must also guard against desiring His blessings more than we desire Him. Think about how His favor has changed your life: Belonging to, knowing, and loving the Lord far outweigh any material provisions He can give.

Snares For Us

“Moreover he must have a good report of them which are without; lest he fall into reproach and the snare of the devil.” (1 Timothy 3:7)

A snare is a trap normally used to catch an unwary wild animal, but each of the five times the word (Greek pagis) is used in the New Testament, it refers to devices used by the great deceiver, Satan, to trap unwary human beings.

There is, first of all, the snare of worldly involvement. “And take heed to yourselves, lest at any time your hearts be overcharged with surfeiting, and drunkenness, and cares of this life, and so that day come upon you unawares. For as a snare shall it come on all them that dwell on the face of the whole earth” (Luke 21:34-35).

There is the snare of rejecting God’s Word, both the written Word and the living Word. When Israel repudiated Christ, God said: “Let their table be made a snare, and a trap, and a stumblingblock, and a recompence unto them” (Romans 11:9, quoting Psalm 69:22). The desire for riches can be a snare. “They that will be rich fall into temptation and a snare, and into many foolish and hurtful lusts, which drown men in destruction and perdition” (1 Timothy 6:9).

Satan has many other “devices” (2 Corinthians 2:11) by which he seeks “an advantage of us.” Not even “bishops” or other full-time Christian ministers are immune, for our text is a warning to prospective bishops against “the snare of the devil.” It is the responsibility of every true “servant of the Lord” to be “gentle unto all men, apt to teach, patient, In meekness instructing those that oppose themselves . . . that they may recover themselves out of the snare of the devil, who are taken captive by him at his will” (2 Timothy 2:24-26). We must both avoid Satan’s snares ourselves and seek to deliver those who have been thus ensnared. HMM

Our Father which art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name

Matthew 6:1-15

We will continue reading from the Sermon on the Mount.

Matthew 6:1

Take heed that ye do not your alms or, as many versions have it

Matthew 6:1

If the action is not done in the Lord’s service, but with a view to our own honour, we cannot expect a reward from above.

Matthew 6:2

Those who blaze abroad their charity enjoy a sort of recompense in the public approbation which they gain, and having thus obtained the reward they seek after, they cannot reasonably expect any other.

Matthew 6:3

Do not let what you have done be so known, even to yourself as to become the subject of self-approbation. Do not count over what has been given, rather go on to give more.

Matthew 6:4

Those who are anxious to have their donations publicly acknowledged, and will give nothing unless it be put down upon a printed list, should take warning from these words. We also should learn to give to the cause of God and to the poor in the quietest manner possible.

Matthew 6:7, 8

The heathen repeat over and over again the same words, as also do the Papists and Semipapists of our own land. This is sheer mockery. God is not deaf or forgetful, neither does he delight in mere sounds. Prayer is the intelligent approach of the mind of man to the mind of God, and in that coming we must not think of adding to the divine knowledge, which is infinite, or dictating to the divine will, which is sovereign.

Matthew 6:9

This is the perfect model by which to shape your prayers.

Matthew 6:10

Out of seven petitions the first three concern the name, kingdom, and will of God. The Lord must occupy the highest place in our prayers, and indeed in our whole lives. The four petitions for ourselves rise by degrees from “bread” up to “deliverance from evil” teaching us that we ought not to grovel in prayer, but to increase in spirituality while we plead.

Matthew 6:11

Give us necessary food, bread for the, day, our own bread, yet thy gracious gift. Give it not only to me, but to all of us, thy children.

Matthew 6:12, 13

We are willing to make this the measure of thy forgiveness.

Matthew 6:12, 13

Do not in thy providence allow us to be placed where we shall be severely tried,

Matthew 6:12, 13

but deliver us from evil: especially the Evil One

 

Our Father, God, who art in heaven,

All hallowed be thy name!

Thy kingdom come; thy will be done,

In earth and heaven the same.

 

Give us, this day, our daily bread;

And, as we those forgive

Who sin against us, so may we

Forgiving grace receive.

 

Into temptation lead us not:

From evil set us free;

The kingdom, power, and glory, Lord,

Ever belong to thee.

 

Are We Really Mired Down?

I know thy works, that thou art neither cold nor hot. (Revelation 3:1)

God will speak to us if we read and study and obey the Word of God! But when He does speak, we should speak back to Him in prayer and devotion. Otherwise, we are among the Christians who are mired down right where we are.

Many in our congregations have grown older and yet are not one inch farther up the mountain than on that day when the sun first arose on them in conversion. In fact, some are not even as far advanced along the way with God as they were a few years ago.

If these things are true, I can only conclude that there are “common” Christians, men and women who no longer hear the Lord speaking to them as they should.

Can they really think that this halfway Christian life is the best that we can know?

In the face of what Christ offers us, how can we settle for so little?

It is a tragedy of our time that so many are settling for less than the Lord is willing to give!

 

My Choice Is His Choice

He shall choose our inheritance for us. Ps. 47:4

Our enemies would allot us a very dreary portion, but we are not left in their hands. The Lord will cause us to stand in our lot, and our place is appointed by His infinite wisdom. A wiser mind than our own arranges our destiny. The ordaining of all things is with God, and we are glad to have it so; we choose that God should choose for us. If we might have our own way we would wish to let all things go in God’s way.

Being conscious of our own folly, we would not desire to rule our own destinies. We feel safer and more at ease when the Lord steers our vessel than we could possibly be if we could direct it according to our own judgment. Joyfully we leave the painful present and the unknown future with our Father, our Saviour, our Comforter.

O my soul, this day lay down thy wishes at Jesus feet! If thou hast of late been somewhat wayward and willful, eager to be and to do after thine own mind, now dismiss thy foolish self, and place the reins in the Lord’s hands. Say, “He shall choose.” If others dispute the sovereignty of the Lord, and glory in the freewill of man, do thou answer them, “He shall choose for me.” It is my freest choice to let Him choose. As a free agent, I elect that He should have absolute sway.

 

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