VIDEO President’s Mothers Day Message – Let’s Set Aside Politics, Give Thanks to God for Gift of Mothers

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For some, the call to Motherhood is biological; adoption beckons others; and beyond these important roles, God calls some to be “spiritual” moms.  It is my prayer that we as human beings will set aside all political platforms this season, and just give thanks to God for the gift of mothers.

While it’s true that every woman isn’t a mother, it can be understood that every mother is a woman. Furthermore, everyone who has been born, past, and present; all of us, male and female, were birthed by a mother.

“When Jesus therefore saw his [biological] mother, and the disciple standing by, whom he loved, Jesus said unto his [supernatural birth] mother, ‘Woman, behold thy son!’ Then Jesus said to the disciple, ‘Behold thy mother!’ And from that hour that disciple took her unto his own home.” John 19:26-27

We can see from this passage that the role of mother opens doors to many possibilities.

This year on Mothers’ Day, women who are also mothers will be celebrated around the world. As mothers, we walk different spiritual paths. We are enjoying different seasons of life. What brings us together in celebration is this divine bond called Motherhood. Of all the women’s rights given to us by God, being a mother is the most magnificent. Parenting has been said to be the great equalizer connecting us beyond race, religion, social status and income level. What joins us together now and forever is that we are all in the same human tribe: Born of One Blood. (Acts 17:26)

“Adam named his wife Eve, because she was the mother of all human beings.” Genesis 3:20 (GNT)

“Children are a gift from God.” Psalm 127:3

“Her children rise up and call her blessed.” Proverbs 31:28

Of course, everyone living is special in God’s eyes; yet on this special day we honor our mothers: past, present and future.

The awesome power within the bodies and hearts of women to bring children into this world and nurture them by birth or adoption is miraculously within humanity to acknowledge and celebrate. The career of Motherhood has a never-ending salary valued at: “Priceless.”   Of all the women’s rights given to us by God, being a mother is the most magnificent. Let us thank God as we “Celebrate Motherhood.”

By Alveda King

Alveda King, niece of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., is the founder of King for America, Inc., consultant to the Africa Humanitarian Christian Fellowship and Pastoral Associate and Director of African-American Outreach for Priests for Life and Gospel of Life Ministries.

 

https://www.cnsnews.com/commentary/alveda-king/alveda-king-lets-set-aside-politics-give-thanks-god-gift-mothers


President Trump’s Mother Day Message


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Remembering The Little Ones Up Above On Mother’s Day

 

 

“We shall find our little ones again up above.”

-St. Zelie Martin

Recently, the state of Nebraska passed a bill that is the first of its kind in the history of the United States. The bill allows parents who have lost a child due to miscarriage to apply for a commemorative birth certificate as long as a health care practitioner has verified the pregnancy. Unlike previous bills which mandated that the miscarried child must have been at least 20 weeks old, this bill has no minimum gestation period.

The beauty of this bill is that it publicly acknowledges the life of the unborn, no matter how short their time may have been with us. Miscarriage is an experience that is all too common but often not spoken about in our culture. It is estimated that 15-20 percent of all pregnancies in the U.S. end in miscarriage. Anecdotally, it seems to me that this number is an underestimate—almost all of the couples I know who have multiple children have experienced at least one miscarriage, if not more.

Although these children are unseen and never encountered face to face, their passing has an unavoidable impact on families, especially mothers. As one woman recounts in Karen Edmiston’s book, After Miscarriage, “I could no more pretend that nothing has happened than I could pretend to be fine if my husband died.” This natural response underscores the deep wound that all mothers who have lost children experience.

Many women may blame themselves or feel ashamed of their miscarriage, and may even be unaware of their grief. Holly Cave recounts one mother who confided to her:

“I thought to grieve you had to have lost something you’d met – like a person that you had talked to – or you could grieve over a baby that maybe you’d held,” she tells me. “I didn’t know anything about grief… I didn’t know whether I should leave that to people who had lost actual people, not a very, very tiny baby that you’ve never met.”

As Edmiston explains, “Grief is necessary, and our children deserve the dignity of our mourning, the recognition of their infinite worth, the respect that is manifest in our grieving of their passing.” Grief is an affirmation of love. It is an affirmation that a child is missed.

It is clear that our society needs to do a better job of honoring the grief of women who have experienced miscarriage. The Nebraska birth certificate bill is a great start in bringing a tragic event into the light in order to help facilitate healing for mothers and their families, especially by officially pronouncing a name for the unknown child. Although no parent should feel guilty if they have not thought of giving their child a name, this can be a beautiful way of affirming God’s gift of life. As Christians, we believe that the life in the womb of a mother possesses an eternal soul, and therefore, the child may possess a name. “Names are powerful,” Edmiston writes. “They identify us, shape us, connect us to one another. . . It is a small but very real gift you can give to the baby you were not able to see or embrace.”

On this Mother’s Day, let us remember and pray in a special way for all those mothers who have children whose lives ended before they were born—from miscarriage, stillbirth, or abortion—or whose lives ended after birth, from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) or other tragedy.

Here are some resources to help those who are grieving the loss of a child:

First published at FRC Blog

By Daniel Hart

https://barbwire.com/2018/05/12/remembering-the-little-ones-up-above-on-mothers-day/

A Mother’s Greatest Gift

Deuteronomy 6:1-9

The greatest gift a mother can give her children is her example of love and obedience to God. Our sons and daughters need to see godly precepts lived out each day in our words and choices, since we are their first spiritual teachers and advisors.

Each child comes into the world with a moldable mind. As we teach and model godly conduct, attitudes, and words, a belief system bent toward God can develop within them. It’s like a sieve that filters everything coming into the mind. A child who has been prayed over and taught God’s ways is more likely to see the world from a biblical perspective. But one who’s been programmed by secular culture or another religion will view life through a distorted lens.

Pastors and Sunday school teachers can help in this process of training a child to know and love the Lord. However, it is primarily the responsibility of parents to invest whatever time, patience, instruction, and love are necessary to grow boys and girls into godly men and women.

Sending a child into the world without a biblical foundation is like throwing him into a lion’s den without weapons or armor. Since children cannot discern truth from error, parents must guard young minds against the world’s onslaught until they are ready to take over the challenge themselves.

The training of children is carried out through the daily activities of life. Use every opportunity to teach them about the Lord and His Word and show them what a righteous life looks like by living one. In other words, be the kind of believer that you hope your child will become.

The Elect Lady

“The elder unto the elect lady and her children, whom I love in the truth; and not I only, but also all they that have known the truth.” (2 John 1:1)

The Greek word for “lady” (kuria) is used only two times in the Bible, and both of these occurrences are here in the one-chapter epistle of 2 John. It is also fascinating to note that kuria is the feminine form of kurios, which is the Greek word for “Lord.”

Evidently this “elect lady” was a special woman, very highly esteemed by the apostle John as a capable and conscientious mother to her children.

It is uncertain, however, whether this distinguished lady was a literal mother in the church with literal children or possibly a metaphor for the church itself, with the “children” its individual members. Good reasons can be given for both interpretations, and it may even be that John wrote his letter with this dual meaning in mind under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit.

In either case, it is significant that this mother is called “lady” instead of the much more frequently used “woman” (Greek gune), or even “mother” (Greek meter). The Greek kuria was evidently used to stress deep respect and honor to such a mother in the church. She clearly was training her children in “the truth,” much as Timothy’s mother, Eunice, and grandmother, Lois, had brought him up to have “unfeigned faith” in “the holy scriptures, which are able to make thee wise unto salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus” (2 Timothy 1:5; 3:15).

In addition to faith in God’s truth, of course, there should be genuine love. The second use of kuria is in verse 5: “And now I beseech thee, lady, not as though I wrote a new commandment unto thee, but that which we had from the beginning, that we love one another” (2 John 1:5). HMM

Set your heart and your soul to seek the Lord your God

Mark 7:1-23

John 7:1

It was a sign of stormy weather when these ill birds came together.

John 7:6-8

These were the ancestors of our modern Ritualists, who are fast bound with idle forms and vain ceremonials, and make a great matter of the cut of a garment, or the colour of a robe.

John 7:9

The keeping of human commands always leads to the neglect of the divine. Superstition strangles true religion.

John 7:10-13

If an ungrateful son did not care to give his parents what they asked, he had only to say that he had made an offering of it, and he was free from all obligation to succour his parents. This was a forcible example of the way in which tradition made void the law of God; but many such might have been quoted, for the Rabbis openly exalted their precepts above the law of Moses. In their Talmud we read, “The words of the scribes are more noble than the words of the law; for the words of the law are both hard and easy, but the words of the scribes are all easy to be understood.”

John 7:14, 15

Godliness does not consist in meats or drinks, in feasting or fasting. No food, unless it be the means of gluttony or drunkenness, has a defiling effect. Tradition makes much of externals, the gospel makes very little.

John 7:20-23

Thus did he set forth the true spiritual religion, wherein holy hearts are everything, and peculiar meats are nothing; obedient lives are acceptable, and rigid abstinences little worth. We do not need salt fish, but salt in ourselves; not unleavened cakes, but hearts free from malice and hypocrisy.

 

Not different food, nor different dress,

Compose the kingdom of our Lord;

But peace, and joy, and righteousness,

Faith, and obedience to his word.

 

Are You Unclean by Comparison?

And when I saw him, I fell at his feet as dead. (Revelation 1:17)

In the Old Testament, whenever the living God revealed Himself in some way to humankind, terror and amazement were the reactions. People saw themselves as guilty and unclean by comparison!

In the book of Revelation, the Apostle John describes the overwhelming nature of his encounter with the Lord of glory. Although a believer and an apostle, John sank down in abject humility and fear when the risen, glorified Lord Jesus appeared before him on Patmos.

Our glorified Lord did not condemn John. He knew that John’s weakness was the reaction to revealed divine strength. He knew that John’s sense of unworthiness was the instant reaction to absolute holiness. Along with John, every redeemed human being needs the humility of spirit that can only be brought about by the manifest Presence of God.

Jesus at once reassured John, stooping to place a nail-pierced hand on the prostrate apostle, and saying: “Do not be afraid. I am the Living One. I was dead, and behold I am alive for ever and ever, and I hold the keys of death and hades.”

 

Day Is At Hand

“And I will give him the morning star.” Rev. 2:28

Until the day break, and the shadows flee away, what a blessing it is to see in Jesus “the morning star”! I remember when we read in the newspapers the idle tale that the star of Bethlehem had again appeared. On inquiry we found that it was only “the morning star”; but no great mistake had been made after all.

It is best to see Jesus as the sun; but when we cannot do so, the next best thing is to see Him as that star which prophesies the day, and shows that the eternal light is near at hand. If I am not today all that I hope to be, yet I see Jesus, and that assures me that I shall one day be like Him. A sight of Jesus by faith is the pledge of beholding Him in His glory and being transformed into His image. If I have not at this hour all the light and joy I could desire, yet I shall have it; for as surely as I see the morning star I shall see the day. The morning star is never far from the sun.

Come, my soul, has the Lord given thee the morning star? Dost thou hold fast that truth, grace, hope, and love which the Lord has given thee? Then in this thou hast the dawn of coming glory. He that makes thee overcome evil, and persevere in righteousness, has therein given thee the morning star.