VIDEO God’s Triple Play

Triple Play

He who promised is faithful. Hebrews 10:23

The nineteenth-century Irish clergyman Robert Traill once pondered the “He” in Hebrews 10:23. Who did the writer have in mind? God the Father, the Son, or the Holy Spirit?

“It is no great matter,” Traill said. “We find … That the promises that are the ground of the Christian’s faith, are the promises of the Father, as the author … We find the promises ascribed unto Jesus Christ, and He is the promiser. So when He left His people and went out of this world, He left them with the … abundance of promises…. The promises are also given by the Holy Ghost; He is called the Spirit of promise.”1

All three Persons of the Godhead work in concerted effort to make and keep every promise in the Bible. God the Father ordains them. Christ purchased them for us with His blood. The Holy Spirit brings them to fruition in our daily experiences.

Broken promises are the source of pain here on earth, but God is changeless. His promises are as sure as His immutable nature; and they are tripled in power for they come from Him who is One, yet Three.

Believe me, there are times when the only thing that keeps me going is a promise from God. Charles Swindoll, in Start Where You Are   1Robert Traill, The Works of the Late Reverend Robert Traill, Volumes 3-4.


 

Bible Promises Spoken – 2 Timothy 2

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The Lord Speaks

Will the one who contends with the Almighty correct him? Job 40:2

We can find nearly every argument in the book of Job about why there is pain in the world, but the arguing never seems to help Job much. His is a crisis of relationship more than a crisis of doubt. Can he trust God? Job wants one thing above all else: an appearance by the one Person who can explain his miserable fate. He wants to meet God Himself, face to face.

Eventually Job gets his wish. God shows up in person (see Job 38:1). He times His entrance with perfect irony, just as Job’s friend Elihu is expounding on why Job has no right to expect a visit from God.

No one—not Job, nor any of his friends—is prepared for what God has to say. Job has saved up a long list of questions, but it is God, not Job, who asks the questions. “Brace yourself like a man,” He begins; “I will question you, and you shall answer me” (v. 3). Brushing aside thirty-five chapters’ worth of debates on the problem of pain, God plunges into a majestic poem on the wonders of the natural world.

God’s speech defines the vast difference between the God of all creation and one puny man like Job. His presence spectacularly answers Job’s biggest question: Is anybody out there? Job can only respond, “Surely I spoke of things I did not understand, things too wonderful for me to know” (42:3).

Lord, we have so many questions about life and its unfairness. You have shown Yourself good to us. Help us to trust You for what we cannot understand.

No calamity is beyond God’s sovereignty.

By Philip Yancey 

INSIGHT

After all Job had endured, how could the Lord of heaven respond to his honest, agonizing questions with more questions?

Job forgot the case he wanted to argue in the court of heaven (Job 23:1–10). The presence and questions of God suddenly reawakened the trust he’d expressed in those first moments of the worst days of his life (1:21; 2:10).

We, on the other hand, have an advantage that Job lacked. In the prologue of Job’s story, we are taken behind the scenes to see how God viewed Job (1:1–2:10).

What if our lives had such a prologue? Would it help to know that more is going on than we can see and that it’s better than we imagine? Even if we aren’t an exemplary example as Job was, can we take heart in being one of the dearly loved sinners for whom Christ died?

Mart DeHaan

Walk in the Light

Ephesians 5:6-16

Yesterday we saw that when we walk in holiness, we change direction from our old life and leave an imprint wherever we go. Now let’s consider one more aspect of this new journey: walking in the light. (See 1 John 1:5-7.)

In 2 Corinthians 6:14, Paul challenges us to consider this question: “What partnership have righteousness and lawlessness, or what fellowship has light with darkness?” He’s saying that just as Christ and Satan can’t have fellowship with each other, neither can good and evil. In other words, sin should become a foreign thing to everyone who knows Christ as Savior. His Holy Spirit helps us become sensitive to the presence of sin.

The Bible says that before we come to Christ, we are not only in darkness, but we aredarkness. The ungodly are darkened in their understanding, ignorant of the truth, callused in their heart, and hardened in their spirit; they have turned themselves over to sin. All of this changes when a person places faith in the Lord. The believer experiences forgiveness and redemption, and what’s more, something else wonderful happens: Darkness is replaced with God’s light and righteousness.

Everyone who chooses to follow God is given a new nature (2 Corinthians 5:17), but patterns of the old self linger. You may think that because you sometimes struggle with sins, godliness is an unattainable goal. However, it is not your own strength that makes you holy, but the Holy One in your heart. When you make Christ the center of your life and daily make the decision to walk in His light, He enables you to live holy in this dark and unholy world.

Yes, Flee and Follow

“Flee also youthful lusts: but follow righteousness, faith, charity, peace, with them that call on the Lord out of a pure heart.” (2 Timothy 2:22)

The first part of this twofold command is to run away from young (new, untested) desires. Sexual immorality is especially to be avoided because “every sin that a man doeth is without the body; but he that committeth fornication sinneth against his own body” (1 Corinthians 6:18).

Two other dangerous desires are identified in the New Testament. We are warned to “flee from idolatry” (1 Corinthians 10:14) and to flee from the “love of money” (1 Timothy 6:10-11). Obviously, there are many “lusts” wrapped up in these categories. They are all dangerous because they are “untested” and deceitful.

Such things will inhibit and injure the Christian. “The cares of this world, and the deceitfulness of riches, and the lusts of other things entering in, choke the word, and it becometh unfruitful” (Mark 4:19). “For all that is in the world, the lust of the flesh, and the lust of the eyes, and the pride of life, is not of the Father, but is of the world” (1 John 2:16).

Such warnings are so common in Scripture that it is easy to become inured to them. But they are critical to a godly life. We are told to “make not provision for the flesh, to fulfil the lusts thereof” (Romans 13:14), but to be “as obedient children, not fashioning yourselves according to the former lusts” (1 Peter 1:14) in order to escape “the corruption that is in the world through lust” (2 Peter 1:4).

In contrast, we must follow after righteousness. The “youthful lusts” can be conquered by the “pursuit” of a godly lifestyle. Even the devil will flee if he is resisted in the faith (James 4:7). HMM III

Thou hast ascended on high

Acts 1

Luke commences the Acts of the Apostles with a kind of preface which runs thus

Acts 1.

Acts 1:7, 8

Humble waiting upon God, and joyful work for him, are the best cures for excessive curiosity.

Acts 1:10, 11

When we stand gazing and. trifling, the consideration of our Master’s second coming should quicken and awaken us; when we stand gazing and trembling, the same truth should comfort and encourage us.

Acts 1:12, 14

Prayer welded them together; we hear no more of those strifes, which were once so frequent, as to which of them should be the greatest.

Acts 1:15, 16

What a gentle way of putting it. Harsh words are not to be used even of the worst of men. One is glad to hear Peter speaking thus calmly, surely he was made tender by the memory of his own fall.

Acts 1:17-26

No instance of the use of the lot occurs after the Spirit was given. It was an Old Testament custom, and to use it now would be idle superstition.

 

Blessedness is to Come

We have a building of God, a house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens. (2 Corinthians 5:1)

A lot of people talk about going to heaven in spite of the feeble hope popular religion affords.

Any valid hope of a state of blessedness beyond the incident of death must be in the goodness of God and in the work of atonement accomplished for us by Jesus Christ on the Cross.

The deep, deep love of God is the fountain out of which flows our future beatitude; and the grace of God in Christ is the channel by which it reaches us. The Cross of Christ creates a moral situation where every attribute of God is on the side of the returning sinner.

The true Christian may safely look forward to a future state that is as happy as perfect love wills it to be. Since love cannot desire for its object anything less than the fullest possible measure of enjoyment for the longest possible time, it is virtually beyond our power to conceive of a future as consistently delightful as that which Christ is preparing for us.

And who is to say what is possible with God?

 

A Name Guarantee

“And whatsoever ye shall ask in my name, that will I do, that the Father may be glorified in the Son.” John 14:13

It is not every believer who has yet learned to pray in Christ’s name. To ask not only for His sake, but in His name, as authorized by Him, is a high order of prayer. We would not dare to ask for some things in that blessed name, for it would be a wretched profanation of it; but when the petition is so clearly right that we dare set the name of Jesus to it, then it must be granted.

Prayer is all the more sure to succeed because it is for the Father’s glory through the Son. It glorifies His truth, His faithfulness, His power, His grace. The granting of prayer, when offered in the name of Jesus, reveals the Father’s love to Him, and the honor which He has put upon Him. The glory of Jesus and of the Father are so wrapped up together, that the grace which magnifies the one magnifies the other. The channel is made famous through the fullness of the fountain, and the fountain is honored through the channel by which it flows. If the answering of our prayers would dishonor our Lord, we would not pray; but since in this thing He is glorified, we will pray without ceasing in that dear name in which God and His people have a fellowship of delight.

 

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