VIDEO Wake Up Christians, Silence Is Not An Option – It Is Well, You Make Me Brave

Wake Up Christians – Silence Is Not An Option

“The men of Issachar had understanding of the times, to know what Israel ought to do” (1 Chronicles 12:32)

Excerpted from the book, One Nation “Above” God. Free download here: https://shaneidleman.com/books/

We don’t have to compromise our principles to be involved in politics—what good is salt left in the shaker, or a light that is hidden? “Politics” is not a bad word. In simple terms, politics refers to governing or leading a group of people. Politics won’t save America, but in order to implement change, honor God, and help others, we must take action. To suggest that God does not want us to elect godly leaders and promote godly legislation runs contrary to His nature (cf. Romans 13). Silence is not an option.

  1. Government is God-ordained. “We the people” are to lead according to God’s Word. Many say, “We don’t need to get involved. God will take care of everything.” Ironically, I’ve never seen that mindset when it comes to work and income. We work, or we don’t eat. God blesses hard work and diligence in financial matters; why wouldn’t He when it comes to leading a nation?
  2. Apathy is not biblical. A believer should be involved in running for office, voting, and/or monitoring those in office to assure that they perform their duties.  The welfare of society often falls into the hands of the Christian community. For those who believe we should remain passive and silent, I challenge you to read the writings of the Old Testament prophets. They lamented, shed tears, and pleaded with the people and the leaders to turn from their sins and to turn back to God—they spoke the truth in love. Even Jesus wept for Jerusalem when He saw its destruction was near. Martin Luther King, Jr., in a Letter from Birmingham Jail on April 16, 1963, wrote, “We will have to repent in this generation not merely for the hateful words and actions of the bad people but for the appalling silence of the good people.” I hold the same opinion today.
  3. We engage the culture or we lose. There is always a fight; the tides of evil will always wash against the shores of hope and peace. Silence is not an option. We can no longer hide behind the excuse, “I don’t want to get involved.” As citizens, we are given the privilege, for now, to place people in positions of leadership. Whether we like it or not, we are involved. Millions are not registered to vote, and millions of registered voters stay at home. We’ll stand in line to see a movie, but we won’t stand in line to vote and elect leaders who will affect the direction of our country. This makes a statement about what we value—and isn’t it sad. During this election cycle, register to vote and then vote your values. It really is that simple. Click here: https://registertovote.ca.gov
  4. All laws impose morality onto others. The real question is “whose” morality prevails? You can’t legislate morality, but you can restrain evil and deter wrongdoing. God doesn’t need a supermajority, but He does need a humble minority. God’s call is not to Washington or Hollywood—“if My people humble themselves” (2 Chronicles 7:14).
  5. The pulpits are not called to be passive. Granted, not everyone is called to the political arena, but all of those called to preach God’s Word must provide practical application on difficult matters. I often wonder if those who remain silent now would have also been silent in the 1800s in regard to slavery? Are these silent men truly filled with the Spirit of God? If so, where is boldness . . . where is righteous indignation that the Spirit provokes in us? When God gives people authority to passionately and lovingly proclaim His Word, souls are converted, lives are changed, and families are restored. Sadly, this is lacking in our day. As the church falls deeper into self-reliance and further from reliance on God, our need for bold leadership has never been greater. Change will only occur when there is a strong conviction of sin, genuine faith, humility, and sincere repentance—may God grant us the wisdom and strength to proclaim these truths. We must stop confusing God’s patience with His approval and preach with conviction from the pulpits again.

[Read more here about the lack of power in the modern-day pulpits of America: https://westsidechristianfellowship.org/articles/101614-where-are-the-men-with-power-in-the-pulpits-today-pastor-shane-idleman/]

  1. God’s Word is very clear on controversial issues. From “thou shalt not steal from citizens and future generations” to “thou shalt not murder innocent children.” If God is clear, why are many Christians vague or indifferent?
  2. “I’m not voting for the lesser of two evils.” This statement is often used by those who want to remain silent, but it’s a flawed argument. We are actually voting for principles, not people—all candidates are sinners. In what direction will they lead our country? Even more importantly, what country will we leave for our children? A third party is not a bad idea, but at this point, it has little influence. When they receive votes, they take away votes from others.

Some time ago, I sat speechless as I listened to a man recount his trip to a holocaust museum with his young daughter. As they walked by photos of the death camps, gas chambers, and countless bodies piled one upon another, his daughter silently contemplated the horrors that were unfolding before her eyes.

When the tour ended, they drove home without saying a word. The father wondered if she truly understood the significance of the event. Was she too young to view such depravity? Was she too fragile to cope with the truth of the holocaust? Would it make a negative impact on her life? Would it leave her fearful and wounded? Would she begin to doubt God?

Trending: Judge Brett Kavanaugh— “It Ain’t Necessarily So!”

His questions were answered nearly two hours later when his daughter finally spoke. She looked at her father and asked, “Daddy, why didn’t someone do something?”

Will we hear those same haunting words from our children and grandchildren? Yes! If we fail to contend for what is right, we may see a time in our history when our children will ask, “Why didn’t someone do something?” Sadly, we will know the answer.

Has the United States lost her mind? Quick clip here:

 

——-

It Is Well – Kristene DiMarco & Bethel Music – You Make Me Brave

Advertisements

It’s Not About the Fish

When God saw what they did and how they turned from their evil ways, he relented. Jonah 3:10

Sighted numerous times off the coast of Australia’s South Queensland, Migaloo is the first albino humpback whale ever documented. The splendid creature, estimated at more than forty feet long, is so rare that Australia passed a law specifically to protect him.

The Bible tells us about a “huge fish” so rare that God had provided it especially to swallow a runaway prophet (Jonah 1:17). Most know the story. God told Jonah to take a message of judgment to Nineveh. But Jonah wanted nothing to do with the Ninevites, who had a reputation for cruelty to just about everyone—including the Hebrews. So he fled. Things went badly. From inside the fish, Jonah repented. Eventually he preached to the Ninevites, and they repented too (3:5–10).

Great story, right? Except it doesn’t end there. While Nineveh repented, Jonah pouted. “Isn’t this what I said, Lord?” he prayed. “I knew that you are a gracious and compassionate God, slow to anger and abounding in love” (4:2). Having been rescued from certain death, Jonah’s sinful anger grew until even his prayer became suicidal (v. 3).

The story of Jonah isn’t about the fish. It’s about our human nature and the nature of the God who pursues us. “The Lord is patient with you,” wrote the apostle Peter, “not wanting anyone to perish, but everyone to come to repentance” (2 Peter 3:9). God offers His love to brutal Ninevites, pouting prophets, and you and me.

Father, we tend to look at what others “deserve” and forget we need Your love just as much. Help us live in Your love and tell others about it.

Our love has limits; God’s love is limitless.

By Tim Gustafson 

INSIGHT

What a difference a couple of chapters can make in the tone of Jonah’s prayers! In Jonah 2:2, the desperate prophet prayed, “In my distress I called to the Lord, and he answered me.” But in Jonah 4:3, he asks God to kill him. God answered the first prayer miraculously, delivering Jonah from death. But with the second prayer, God simply asked, “Is it right for you to be angry?” (4:4). Then Jonah actually repeats his death wish. “I’m so angry I wish I were dead” (v. 9). Even then, God appealed to Jonah by sharing His heart for all of humanity. “Should I not have concern for the great city of Nineveh?” God even extends His concern to the animals that would have been destroyed in Nineveh (v. 11). The book of Jonah provides a fascinating contrast between human nature, which is self-serving, and the profoundly loving and patient character of God.

How do we respond to God’s grace to us? Do we resent it when He extends that grace to others we may perceive as “worse” than we are? Do we resemble Jonah when things don’t go the way we’d like them to?

Tim Gustafson

Maintaining Our Witness in Trials

1 Peter 2:11-12

You are being watched. That’s always a good thing to remember as we interact with people at work or in the community. How we respond to frustrations, annoyances, difficulties, and temptations is a witness for Christianity, and the last thing we want to do is misrepresent Christ.

Many times challenging situations arise unexpectedly. Therefore, it’s important that we prepare ourselves beforehand—then we’ll be equipped to display Christlikeness, and our witness will not be derailed. To be ready …

Stay in God’s Word. Knowing Scripture helps you view situations from God’s perspective and know how He would have you respond.

Pray. Challenge yourself to make prayer an immediate response to your problems. When you bring your concerns to God, His peace will guard your heart and mind, which is a powerful witness to a watching world (Phil. 4:6-7).

Trust and obey. When you rely on God’s promises, your peace and confidence in God will stand out to those who are consumed with fear and anxiety.

Remember whose you are. You belong to God and have been purchased by the precious blood of Christ (1 Peter 1:17-19). Your life is a display of God’s grace, and your character, conduct, and conversation should always reflect Christ.

Be gracious and kind to others. Don’t let your own troubles erupt into anger and blame. Small acts of kindness and a forgiving spirit are a tremendous witness in a world where such things are rare.

Aggravations and problems seem like hindrances to us, but our response can change someone’s life if it reflects the love of Jesus Christ.

But When You Do Sin

“And if any man sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous.” (1 John 2:1)

There is no suggestion anywhere in Scripture that any person can be sinless. “All have sinned” (Romans 3:23), the Bible boldly declares. “There is none righteous, no, not one” (Romans 3:10). Repentance toward God (Acts 20:21) and salvation by God (2 Corinthians 7:10) eternally settles the issue of the sinful condition inherent in us (Ephesians 2:1-8). However, even though we have been “made the righteousness of God in him” (2 Corinthians 5:21), we still commit sinful acts (1 John 1:8-10)!

Hallelujah for the Advocate! What a blessed promise it is that is recorded for us that the same Jesus Christ who died for our sins, who rose from the grave in glorious victory over sin, “is even at the right hand of God, who also maketh intercession for us” (Romans 8:34).

Although our security in the completed work of Christ Jesus is “for ever” (Hebrews 10:12), our great High Priest (Hebrews 4:14) stands ready to rebut the constant efforts of Satan to flaunt our sins before the holy throne of God (Revelation 12:10). We have no standing there on our own. Our life, even though forgiven and rescued from sin, still is tainted with the deeds and consequences of evil choices. Even the body in which we live houses “no good thing” (Romans 7:18).

Were it up to us to be holy, we would quickly be defamed by the reality of our life. The child of God, though redeemed by “the precious blood of Christ” (1 Peter 1:19), has no ability to plead Christ’s work in person before the throne. “Wherefore he [Jesus] is able also to save them to the uttermost that come unto God by him, seeing he ever liveth to make intercession for them” (Hebrews 7:25). HMM III

The Word of God is not bound

Acts 28:16-31

Acts 28:16

He, no doubt, had a house near the Prætorian barracks, and thus enjoyed more liberty than in a prison; but he had a soldier fastened to his arm by a chain, a cause of constant discomfort, however courteous the soldier might be.

Acts 28:21, 22

This has always been the mark of real Christians; and yet, for all that, they conquer the hearts of men. Christ is set for a sign which shall be spoken against, and to be called “a sect,” has been the constant lot of his faithful church.

Acts 28:23

Such industry should shame us. Paul was not content with delivering a sermon every day, but kept his house open to inquirers, and poured out continually a stream of holy teaching.

Acts 28:24

That is always the case, whoever may be the preacher. On the stony ground the seed brings forth no harvest, even though an apostolic hand sows it. To which of the two classes do we belong? Do we believe? Or are we unbelievers still?

Acts 28:25-28

If we also remain unbelieving, God may take the gospel from us, and send it to others who will accept it. That would be a dreadful thing indeed. How long will it be ere we believe in Jesus? Do we mean to provoke the Lord to forsake us for ever?

Acts 28:30, 31

Thus Luke, beginning at Jerusalem, closes his narrative at Rome, following the footprints of the gospel from the Mount of Olives to the City of the Seven Hills, and showing how the foundations of the church were laid both in Asia and Europe. What was begun with so much heroism ought to be continued with ardent zeal, since we are assured that the same Lord is mighty still to carry on his heavenly designs.

 

Christ and his cross is all our theme;

The mysteries that we speak

Are scandal in the Jew’s esteem,

And folly to the Greek.

 

But souls enlighteh’d from above

With joy receive the Word;

They see what wisdom, power, and love

Shine in their dying Lord.

 

Get Rid of the Root of Bitterness

Looking diligently… lest any root of bitterness springing up trouble you. (Hebrews 12:15)

It is on record that Charles Spurgeon made this comment about a man who was well-known for his bitter and resentful spirit: “May the grass grow green on his grave when he dies, for nothing ever grew around him while he lived!”

The sad and depressing bitter soul will compile a list of slights at which it takes offense and will watch over itself like a mother bear over her cubs. And the figure is apt, for the resentful heart is always surly and suspicious like a she-bear!

In our Christian fellowship, what can be more depressing than to find a professed Christian defending his or her supposed rights and bitterly resisting any attempt to violate them? Such a Christian has never accepted the way of the Cross. The sweet graces of meekness and humility are unknown to that person. Every day he or she grows harder and more acrimonious, trying to defend reputation, right, ministry, against imagined foes.

Is there a cure for this? Yes! The cure is to die to self and rise with Christ into newness of life!

 

Among the Redeemed

“Lo, the people shall dwell alone, and shall not be reckoned among the nations.” Num. 23:9

Who would wish to dwell among the nations, and to be numbered with them? Why, even the professing church is such that to follow the Lord fully within its bounds is very difficult. There is such a mingling and mixing that one often sighs for “a lodge in some vast wilderness.”

Certain it is that the Lord would have His people follow a separated path as to the world, and come out decidedly and distinctly from it. We are set apart by the divine decree, purchase, and calling, and our inward experience has made us greatly to differ from men of the world; and therefore our place is not in their Vanity Fair, nor in their City of Destruction, but in the narrow way where all true pilgrims must follow their Lord.

This may not only reconcile us to the world’s cold shoulder and sneers, but even cause us to accept them with pleasure as being a part of our covenant portion. Our names are not in the same book, we are not of the same seed, we are not bound for the same place, neither are we trusting to the same guide, therefore it is well that we are not of their number. Only let us be found in the number of the redeemed, and we are content to be odd and solitary to the end of the chapter.

 

%d bloggers like this: