VIDEO Life Is What You Make It: Make Haste Time Is Important – Christian Force Multiplier

Make Haste Time Is Important

Send Zenas the lawyer and Apollos on their journey with haste. Titus 3:13

The Lord hasn’t allocated us much time on earth; we’re made for eternity in heaven. In the time we have left, let’s set about our Father’s business with haste.

The apostle Paul wrote to Titus, giving him a message for two men—Zenas and Apollos. Of Zenas, we know nothing; he is mentioned only here in the Bible. Apollos, however, was a well-known teacher. Paul’s message to them both was: There’s no time to waste. Hurry up. Make haste.

Charles Spurgeon once preached a sermon from Luke 14:23, the passage where the master says to the servant, “Go out into the highways and hedges, and compel them to come in.” Spurgeon was so overcome by the urgency of the task that he skipped the introduction of his sermon and started compelling people to come to Christ, immediately, urgently, now.

Let’s do the same! Make haste. Time is short.

I feel in such a haste to go out and obey this commandment this morning by compelling those to come in who are now tarrying in the highways and hedges that I cannot wait for an introduction, but must at once set about my business.
Charles Spurgeon, in opening his sermon, “Compel Them to Come In”


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What We Can Do

In your relationships with one another, have the same mindset as Christ Jesus. Philippians 2:5

Even though confined to his bed, 92-year-old Morrie Boogaart knit hats for the homeless in Michigan. He had reportedly made more than 8,000 hats in fifteen years. Instead of focusing on his health or limitations, Mr. Boogaart looked beyond himself and did what he could to place the needs of others above his own. He declared that his work made him feel good and gave him a purpose. He said, “I’m going to do this until I go home to the Lord”—which happened in February 2018. Though most recipients of his hats won’t know his story or how much he sacrificed to create each cap, Morrie’s simple act of persevering love is now inspiring people across the world.

We too can look past our struggles, place others before ourselves, and imitate our loving and compassionate Savior, Jesus Christ (Philippians 2:1–5). God in the flesh—the King of Kings—took on the “very nature of a servant” in genuine humility (vv. 6–7). Giving His life—the ultimate sacrifice—He took our place on the cross (v. 8). Jesus gave everything for us . . . all for the glory of God the Father (vv. 9–11).

As believers in Jesus, it’s our privilege to show love and demonstrate concern for others through acts of kindness. Even if we don’t think we have much to offer, we can adopt the attitude of servanthood. We can actively seek opportunities to make a difference in people’s lives by simply doing what we can.

How do you enjoy serving others? Share at Facebook.com/ourdailybread.

We can model Christ’s love by doing what we can to serve others.

By Xochitl Dixon 

INSIGHT

Before pointing to Christ Jesus—the supreme example of humility and selfless service-Paul exhorts believers to humbly serve the interests of others (Philippians 2:1-5). Previously Paul had instructed believers about the responsibilities of their heavenly citizenship (1:27). Gospel-worthy living finds expression in the context of worldly opposition (vv. 28-30) and among believers who share the blessings of a common spiritual union (2:1).

Arthur Jackson

Devoted to Prayer

Colossians 4:2-4

No matter where we are in our Christian walk, most of us will admit that our prayer life isn’t what we’d like it to be. Our attempts to make room for prayer in our busy schedules are often short-lived. And when we do manage to spend time with the Lord, we find ourselves easily distracted by random thoughts, our own desires, and the demands of the day.

Instead of giving up in frustration and settling for a sporadic devotional experience, we need to realize that prayer was essential to Christ and should be to us also. The road to a deepening prayer life begins with a commitment to make it a top priority in our day.

We follow through by setting aside a daily time to pray and read from God’s Word. Then we need to find a location that minimizes interruptions. Since we’re already busy, sacrifice may be necessary to make this happen. We might have to wake up earlier, give up a favorite activity, or use our lunch hour.

Scripture is a key factor because it teaches us about our Father’s character, promises, and priorities. The Word of God shifts our thoughts from worldly cares and pleasures to a focus on Him. Through it, we are reminded of His importance to us and our desire to please Him. Then we become ready to ask in accordance with His will and hear what He has to say.

Developing a habit of prayer may require sacrifice, but it’s worth the cost and effort. Spending time in the Lord’s presence is the best way for us to know Him better and love Him more.

Exalting the Only Anointed One

“The adversaries of the Lord shall be broken to pieces; out of heaven shall he thunder upon them: the Lord shall judge the ends of the earth; and he shall give strength unto his king, and exalt the horn of his anointed.” (1 Samuel 2:10) 

This is a remarkable prayer, uttered under divine inspiration by Hannah, thanking God for the miraculous birth of Samuel. It contains the first explicit reference in the Bible to the Messiah (“anointed,” in the Hebrew, is Messiah, equivalent to the Greek “Christ”). Hannah’s prophetic prayer predicts the ultimate exaltation of Messiah over all the adversaries of the Lord to the very ends of the earth.

Hannah also prophesied the coming of the Lord’s great King. Yet this was during the time of the judges, long before the people of Israel even began to request a king.

In fact, the entire prophecy is the first of many similar prophecies throughout the Bible that look forward to the return of the Lord “out of heaven” to judge all nations, to destroy His enemies, and to establish His anointed one as King of the earth.

There is nothing comparable to this prophecy in the earlier books of the Bible, but it is a theme often emphasized in the psalms and in the books of prophecy, as well as in the New Testament. For example, note David’s great prophecy: “The kings of the earth set themselves, and the rulers take counsel together, against the LORD, and against his anointed. . . . Then shall he speak unto them in his wrath. . . . Yet have I set my king upon my holy hill of Zion. . . . and the uttermost parts of the earth for thy possession” (Psalm 2:2, 5-6, 8).

There are many similar later prophecies, but it is significant that the first one also contains the first mention of Messiah, and that was from the lips of a humble, but devout, mother. HMM

Let no man deceive you by any means

2 Thessalonians 2

Paul’s first letter to the Thessalonians was misunderstood, and he therefore wrote them a second time. They had come to believe that the Lord would appear at once, whereas all that Paul had stated was, that the Lord would certainly come, that the time was unrevealed, and that, therefore, they should live in daily watchfulness. He here corrects their wrong impressions.

2 Thessalonians 2:3, 4

It is difficult to give this passage any other interpretation than the common one. The  system of Popery was foreseen by the apostle, and it is every day developing itself. A few months ago the Pope claimed to be infallible, but long before he had been publicly adored, and spoken of as “our Lord God the Pope.”

2 Thessalonians 2:7

There were elements at work even in Paul’s day, which only needed the removal of persecution to develop themselves. The traditions of men were beginning to mislead the church, and Paul saw that in after years, when the civil powers ceased their opposition, the pride of man would be rampant, and the church would yield to Antichrist.

2 Thessalonians 2:11, 12

It is hard to account for the apparent sincerity of Romish emissaries and their dupes, except upon the theory that they are given over to their delusions and justly left to perish in their own folly.

2 Thessalonians 2:13, 14

Electing love has called us out of the world and saved us from the vile priestcraft which slays its thousands: let us give thanks to God for this as long as we live.

2 Thessalonians 2:15

Hold such traditions, but not the traditions of men.

2 Thessalonians 2:16, 17

A blessed prayer. Comfort and stablish—two choice blessings; Lord grant them to us for Jesus sake. Amen.

 

Hasten, Lord! the promised hour;

Come in glory and in power;

Still thy foes are unsubdued;

Nature sighs to be renewed.

 

Time has nearly reach’d its sum,

All things with thy bride say, “Come;”

Jesus, whom all worlds adore,

Come, and reign for evermore!

 

Prayers: Are They Too Late?

For the great day of his wrath is come; who shall be able to stand? (Revelation 6:17)

John, in the sixth chapter of Revelation, describes the most tragic, unavailing prayer meeting in the world’s history!

Cries and groans, shouts and demands, moans and whispers—all will be heard in that coming Day of the Lord when the forces of judgment are released. Even the mountains and the islands will be removed from their places.

But by then, the prayers and cries of sinful men and women will be too little and too late!

All of the great men of the earth, all the important people, all who have mistakenly put their trust and hope in purely human abilities will join those crying out in guilt. They will call on the crumbling rocks and mountains to fall on them to hide them from the wrath of God.

I am among those who believe that the judgments of God are certain. We do not know the day nor the hour. But God is indeed going to shake the earth as it has never been shaken before, and He will turn it over to the Worthy One to whom it belongs—Jesus Christ!

 

Necessary Knowledge

“Thus shall they know that I the Lord their God am with them, and that they, even the house of Israel, are my people, saith the Lord God.” Ezek. 34:30

To be the Lord’s own people is a choice blessing, but to know that we are such is a comfortable blessing. It is one thing to hope that God is with us, and another thing to know that He is so. Faith saves us, but assurance satisfies us. We take God to be our God when we believe in Him; but we get the joy of Him when we know that He is ours, and that we are His. No believer should be content with hoping and trusting, he should ask the Lord to lead him on to full assurance, so that matters of hope may become matters of certainty.

It is when we enjoy covenant blessings, and see our Lord Jesus raised up for us as a plant of renown, that we come to a clear knowledge of the favor of God toward us. Not by law, but by grace, do we learn that we are the Lord’s people. Let us always turn our eyes in the direction of free grace. Assurance of faith can never come by the works of the law. It is an evangelical virtue, and can only reach us in a gospel way. Let us not look within. Let us look to the Lord alone. As we see Jesus we shall see our salvation.

 

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