VIDEO Are Boarders Biblical? – King Cyrus and today

As we watch this utter humanitarian disaster unfold on our southern border – a “man-caused disaster” if there ever was one – it’s natural to ask what insight we might gain from the Bible regarding borders.

What we learn from the Bible is that borders are God’s idea, and that such borders are to be respected. They are not to be crossed without permission.

Crossing a border without permission is like breaking in the back door of a house to help yourself to goodies instead of being invited in by the host through the front door. You might get to eat either way, in the same house and from the same cupboard, but in one case you would be doing something that will land you in jail, in the other upholding the rule of law and civility.

The Scriptures make it clear that national sovereignty, including clearly defined borders, is God’s idea. In Acts 17:26, we read, “And he made from one man every nation of mankind to live on all the face of the earth, having determined allotted periods and the boundaries of their dwelling place…” (Emphasis mine throughout.)

Two things, we are told, are under God’s sovereign control: how long a nation lasts, and where its borders are. The verb translated “having determined” is the Greek verb “horizo,” from which we get the word “horizon.” It means “to mark out, to define.” So God has marked out and defined the borders of each country.

Our southern border is there by God’s design. To disregard it, to treat it as if it were not there, to regard it as something not worth respecting and defending, is an insult to the God who put it there for our benefit.

The bulk of the second half of Joshua is a record of the promised land being divided up among the 12 tribes. What is striking is how thorough and detailed the description of each tribal boundary is. In Joshua 15 the word “boundary” is found no less than 15 times in describing the perimeter of Judah.

For instance, here’s the description of the southern boundary: “It goes out southward of the ascent of Akrabbim, passes along to Zin, and goes up south of Kadesh-barnea, along by Hezron, up to Addar, turns about to Karak, passes along to Azmon, goes out by the Brook of Egypt and comes to its end at the sea. This shall be your southern boundary” (Joshua 15:3-4). Such detailed delineations go on for chapter after chapter.

Even regarding private property, curses were pronounced on anyone who moved a boundary marker, a stone which delineated the perimeter of privately owned land. Borders, boundaries and property lines clearly matter to God.

That such national boundaries are to be respected is made plain by no less a personage than Moses himself. In a largely forgotten passage, Numbers 20:14-21, we read that Moses sought permission from the king of Edom to cross his border and pass through his land. When permission was refused, Moses didn’t force his way in; he respected the king’s decision and went around Edom to the East.

Moses couched his original request this way:

“Please let us pass through your land. We will not pass through field or vineyard, or drink water from a well…we will not turn aside to the right hand or to the left until we have passed through your territory.”

The king’s response? “You shall not pass through.” Moses tries a second time to secure an entrance visa. “We will go up by the highway, and if we drink of your water, I and my livestock, then I will pay for it. Let me only pass through on foot, nothing more.”

The king of Edom was utterly impervious to this plea for so much as a tourist visa. “You shall not pass through.” How did Moses react to this denial of permission to immigrate into and through the sovereign territory of another nation? Did he barge ahead anyway? Try to sneak in under cover of darkness? Did he launch a military strike to secure passage? Nope. “Thus Edom refused to give Israel passage through his territory, so Israel turned away from him.”

The lesson? Each nation’s sovereignty is marked by its border, and each nation has the moral right to decide who will be given permission to enter its sovereign territory. Moses recognized this, and so should we. The only exception is under circumstances of a just war.

Bottom line: borders are biblical, and are there by God’s sovereign design. And they are to be respected by everyone.

 

Follow me on Twitter: @BryanJFischer, on Facebook at “Focal Point”

Host of “Focal Point” on American Family Radio, 1:05 pm CT, M-F  www.afr.net

https://barbwire.com/trump-is-right-on-the-border-the-bible-says-so/


PROPHETIC ALERT – TROUBLE IN THE 70TH YEAR | EPISODE 954


Advertisements

Keeping Your Balance – Leave Room for God

Keeping Your Balance

Honor the Lord with your possessions. Proverbs 3:9

Someone said, “Old bookkeepers never die; they just lose their balance.” When it comes to keeping our books, we need a balanced perspective. On the one hand, the Bible tells us to be like the ant, which “provides her supplies in the summer, and gathers her food in the harvest” (Proverbs 6:8). Proverbs 13:11 says, “Whoever gathers money little by little makes it grow” (NIV). The wise woman in Proverbs 31 considered a field and bought it (verse 16).

On the other hand, Jesus spoke of the rich fool who hoarded his wealth and laid up treasure for himself but was not rich toward God (Luke 12:21).

When we work hard and save wisely, our actions can honor God. When we share with others and freely give our tithes and offerings to God, these actions honor Him too. The guiding principle is found in Proverbs 3:9-10: “Honor the Lord with your possessions, and with the firstfruits of all your increase; so your barns will be filled with plenty.” In other words, honor God with your money and with the first part of all your income, then you’ll better appreciate the blessings He pours into your life.

If we don’t faithfully give to the Lord, we don’t really trust the Lord. Warren Wiersbe in Be Skillful


Leave Room for God

As servants of God, we must learn to make room for Him— to give God “elbow room.” We plan and figure and predict that this or that will happen, but we forget to make room for God to come in as He chooses. Would we be surprised if God came into our meeting or into our preaching in a way we had never expected Him to come? Do not look for God to come in a particular way, but do look for Him. The way to make room for Him is to expect Him to come, but not in a certain way. No matter how well we may know God, the great lesson to learn is that He may break in at any minute. We tend to overlook this element of surprise, yet God never works in any other way. Suddenly—God meets our life “…when it pleased God….”

Keep your life so constantly in touch with God that His surprising power can break through at any point. Live in a constant state of expectancy, and leave room for God to come in as He decides.

WISDOM FROM OSWALD CHAMBERS

We are apt to think that everything that happens to us is to be turned into useful teaching; it is to be turned into something better than teaching, viz. into character. We shall find that the spheres God brings us into are not meant to teach us something but to make us something. The Love of God—The Ministry of the Unnoticed, 664 L

 

You Need A Healthy Body

1 Corinthians 6:12-20

Many people today are obsessed with health and fitness. They watch what they eat and exercise religiously, but is that really the most important thing in life? Not according to Scripture. Paul told Timothy, “Bodily discipline is only of little profit, but godliness is profitable for all things” (1 Tim. 4:8). Yet this doesn’t mean we should ignore our physical bodies and indulge in unhealthy practices. These are the only bodies we have at present—the only ones with which to serve the Lord and accomplish whatever He’s planned for us. Therefore, we should do our best to take care of them.

So what does Scripture say about our bodies? Paul teaches that if we are believers, they belong to God, are members of Christ, and are temples of the Holy Spirit. What an amazing thought—that our bodies belong to the divine Trinity. Therefore we must care for them and not ignore or abuse them with sinful or self-indulgent practices.

Because Christians respect church as a place where God is worshipped, none of us would walk into a sanctuary and deliberately vandalize it by smearing paint all over the walls. Yet our bodies are indwelt by the Holy Spirit and are worthy of more honor than any house of worship.

Nevertheless, some believers assume that neglecting or mistreating their bodies is their prerogative. However, as we read in Scripture, our bodies belong not to us but to the Lord, who purchased us with His own blood. The goal isn’t to make physical health an idol, but to be responsible to God for how we treat this marvelous gift from Him.

The God Man

“That which was from the beginning, which we have heard, which we have seen with our eyes, which we have looked upon, and our hands have handled, of the Word of life.” (1 John 1:1) 

It has been said, quite cogently, that John’s gospel assumes the humanity and undertakes to prove the deity of Jesus Christ, whereas John’s first epistle assumes His deity and then seeks to prove His humanity. The Lord Jesus Christ was both fully God and perfect man.

John, in his gospel, says: “These are written, that ye might believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God; and that believing ye might have life through his name” (John 20:31). In his epistle, he says: “Every spirit that confesseth that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh is of God: And every spirit that confesseth not that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh is not of God” (1 John 4:2-3).

His deity had been fully demonstrated by His mighty miracles, by His bodily resurrection. However, there were many who questioned His true humanity in John’s day, as they do in ours. Even today, many cultists, as well as liberals, try to make a distinction between the man Jesus of Nazareth (whose absolute deity they reject) and “the Christ,” an ideal spirit or idea of some sort, who is not actually a living being but who may come upon or indwell certain people at times.

Such a concept John vehemently rejected, attributing it to the spirit of antichrist. They had heard Him; they had touched and handled Him. There was no doubt whatever that, both before and after His resurrection, He was a true man—in fact, a perfect man—as God intended man to be. He could die for our sins because He was sinless man; He could take away our sins because He is omnipotent God. HMM

People Are What They Focus On

Keep thy heart with all diligence; for out of it are the issues of life.

—Proverbs 4:23

Every person is really what he or she secretly admires. If I can learn what you admire, I will know what you are, for people are what they think about when they are free to think about what they will.

Now, there are times when we are forced to think about things that we do not care to think about at all. All of us have to think about income taxes, but income taxes are not what we want to think about. The law makes us think about them every April. You may find me humped over Form 1040, just like everyone else, but that is not the real me. It is really the man with the tall hat and the spangled stars in Washington who says, “You can’t let it go any longer!” I assure you it is not consentingly done! But if you can find what I think about when I am free to think about whatever I will, you will find the real me. That is true of every one of us.

Your baptism and your confirmation and your name on the church roll and the big Bible you carry—these are not the things that are important to God. You can train a chimpanzee to carry a Bible. Every one of us is the sum of what we secretly admire, what we think about and what we would like to do most if we became free to do what we wanted to do.   FBR096

Lord, may the secret thoughts of my heart be pure thoughts, pleasing to You, completely under the control of Your Holy Spirit. Amen.

 

I really can do all things through Christ, which strengtheneth me

I can do all things through Christ, which strengtheneth me.—Philippians 4:13.

Let him take hold of my strength.—Isaiah 27:5.

 

Thou canst o’ercome this heart of mine,

Thou wilt victorious prove;

For everlasting strength is Thine,

And everlasting love.

Charles Wesley.

 

We are conscious of our own weakness and of the strength of evil; but not of the third force, stronger than either ourselves or the power of evil, which is at our disposal if we will draw upon it. What is needed is a deliberate and whole-hearted realization that we are in Christ, and Christ is in us by His Spirit; an unconditional surrender of faith to Him; a practice, which grows more natural by exercise, of remembering and deliberately drawing by faith upon His strength in the moments of temptation and not merely upon our own resources. “In the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth I will do thus and thus.” So we too may form, like St. Paul, the habit of victory.

Charles Gore.

 

He Acts On An Honest Confession

“He looketh upon men, and if any say, I have sinned, and perverted that which was right, and it profited me not; he will deliver his soul from going into the pit, and his life shall see the light.” Job 33:27, 28

This is a word of truth, gathered from the experience of a man of God, and it is tantamount to a promise. What the Lord has done, and is doing, He will continue to do while the world standeth. The Lord will receive into His bosom all who come to Him with a sincere confession of their sin; in fact, He is always on the look-out to discover any that are in trouble because of their faults.

Can we not endorse the language here used? Have we not sinned, sinned personally so as to say, “I have sinned”? Sinned willfully, having perverted that which is right? Sinned so as to discover that there is no profit in it, but an eternal loss? Let us, then, go to God with this honest acknowledgment. He asks no more. We can do no less.

Let us plead His promise in the name of Jesus. He will deliver us from the pit of hell which yawns for us; He will grant us life and light. Why should we despair? Why should we even doubt? The Lord does not mock humble souls. He means what He says. The guilty can be forgiven. Those who deserve execution can receive free pardon. Lord, we confess, and we pray thee to forgive!

 

%d bloggers like this: