VIDEO His Commission to Us

His Commission to Us

This is love in the making. The love of God is not created— it is His nature. When we receive the life of Christ through the Holy Spirit, He unites us with God so that His love is demonstrated in us. The goal of the indwelling Holy Spirit is not just to unite us with God, but to do it in such a way that we will be one with the Father in exactly the same way Jesus was. And what kind of oneness did Jesus Christ have with the Father? He had such a oneness with the Father that He was obedient when His Father sent Him down here to be poured out for us. And He says to us, “As the Father has sent Me, I also send you” (John 20:21).

Peter now realizes that he does love Him, due to the revelation that came with the Lord’s piercing question. The Lord’s next point is— “Pour yourself out. Don’t testify about how much you love Me and don’t talk about the wonderful revelation you have had, just ‘Feed My sheep.’ ” Jesus has some extraordinarily peculiar sheep: some that are unkempt and dirty, some that are awkward or pushy, and some that have gone astray! But it is impossible to exhaust God’s love, and it is impossible to exhaust my love if it flows from the Spirit of God within me. The love of God pays no attention to my prejudices caused by my natural individuality. If I love my Lord, I have no business being guided by natural emotions— I have to feed His sheep. We will not be delivered or released from His commission to us. Beware of counterfeiting the love of God by following your own natural human emotions, sympathies, or understandings. That will only serve to revile and abuse the true love of God.

WISDOM FROM OSWALD CHAMBERS

Jesus Christ reveals, not an embarrassed God, not a confused God, not a God who stands apart from the problems, but One who stands in the thick of the whole thing with man.  Disciples Indeed, 388 L


Peter, Do You Love Me?

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A Purpose in Pain?

[God] comforts us in all our troubles, so that we can comfort those in any trouble with the comfort we ourselves receive from God. 2 Corinthians 1:4

 

When Siu Fen discovered she had kidney failure and would need dialysis for the rest of her life, she wanted to give up. Retired and single, the longtime believer in Jesus saw no point in prolonging her life. But friends convinced her to persevere and go for dialysis and trust in God to help her.

Two years later, she found her experience coming into play when she visited a friend from church with a debilitating disease. The woman felt alone, as few could truly understand what she was going through. But Siu Fen was able to identify with her physical and emotional pain and could connect with her in a personal way. Her own journey enabled her to walk alongside the woman, giving her a special measure of comfort others couldn’t. “Now I see how God can still use me,” she said.

It can be hard to understand why we suffer. Yet God can use our affliction in unexpected ways. As we turn to Him for comfort and love in the midst of trials, it also empowers us to help others. No wonder Paul learned to see purpose in his own suffering: It gave him the opportunity to receive God’s comfort, which he could then use to bless others (2 Corinthians 1:3–­5). We’re not asked to deny our pain and suffering, but we can take heart in God’s ability to use it for good.

By Leslie Koh

Today’s Reflection

How has God used you to bring comfort to another? How has your faith helped you to persevere?

The Purpose of Equipping

Ephesians 4:11-16

Have you given any serious thought lately to what the purpose of your life is? Our culture is full of distractions and activities that appear to promise fulfillment or pleasure. So it is easy to forget that we are living on this earth for God’s glory and purposes, not our own.

Besides endowing us with spiritual gifts to use in carrying out our calling, the Lord also gives the church gifted women and men who are entrusted with the responsibility of equipping believers (Eph. 4:11-12). This prepares us …

To serve in the body (Eph. 4:12). The church is edified when we each use our spiritual gifts to serve one another.

To attain the unity of the faith and knowledge of Christ (v. 13). This is the establishment of sound doctrine and truth by which the church is grounded and unified.

To achieve spiritual maturity (v. 13). Knowing truth helps us grow in Christlikeness and protects us from being deceived by false teaching (Eph. 4:14).

To hold fast to Christ as the head of the church (Eph. 4:15-16). When the believers are equipped by godly pastors through the Word of God and each one does his part in working together, the whole church functions according to Christ’s headship. Then the entire body exhibits growth that is from the Lord.

While God does give many things for our enjoyment, to live only for life’s pleasures is shortsighted; doing so would result in great disappointment when we stand before Christ to give an account of our life. But living with God’s purposes in mind will ultimately glorify Him and prove most satisfying.

Messages from the Messiah’s Life: The Virgin Birth

 

“The LORD hath created a new thing in the earth, A woman shall compass a man.” (Jeremiah 31:22)

The entire gospel authority rests on the fact of the sinless life of the Lord Jesus—beginning with His conception.

“Therefore the Lord himself shall give you a sign; Behold, a virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel” (Isaiah 7:14). An ‘owth (the Hebrew word for “the token” or “the miracle”) would prove that the child born, the son given, would be none other than the “Wonderful, Counsellor, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace” (Isaiah 9:6).

When Matthew and Luke speak of the virgin birth (Matthew 1:23; Luke 1:27), they use the Greek word parthenos, which is only used of an actual virgin. Yet, even as clear as the words may be, the reason for the virgin birth is more important still.

The Lamb of God (John 1:29) must be “a lamb without blemish and without spot” (1 Peter 1:19). Resting on the centuries of the example of the perfect sacrifice with the Passover lamb (Exodus 12:5), “even Christ our passover is sacrificed for us” (1 Corinthains 5:7).

This “last Adam,” created to be the “quickening spirit” (1 Corinthians 15:45), was “holy, harmless, undefiled, separate from sinners, and made higher than the heavens” (Hebrews 7:26). This virgin-born Immanuel was “made flesh” (John 1:14) “to take away our sins” (1 John 3:5) “that we might be made the righteousness of God in him” (2 Corinthians 5:21).

This all began (in real time) with the sinless, virgin-born conception of the Messiah “which God, that cannot lie, promised before the world began” (Titus 1:2). HMM III

Acquaintance, Not Hearsay

And they said one to another, Did not our heart burn within us while he talked with us by the way, and while he opened to us the scriptures?

—Luke 24:32

“It is one thing,” said Henry Suso, “to hear for oneself a sweet lute, sweetly played, and quite another thing merely to hear about it.”

And it is one thing, we may add, to hear truth inwardly for one’s very self, and quite another thing merely to hear about it….

We are turning out from the Bible schools of this country year after year young men and women who know the theory of the Spirit-filled life but do not enjoy the experience. These go out into the churches to create in turn a generation of Christians who have never felt the power of the Spirit and who know nothing personally about the inner fire. The next generation will drop even the theory. That is actually the course some groups have taken over the past years.

One word from the lips of the man who has actually heard the lute play will have more effect than a score of sermons by the man who has only heard that it was played. Acquaintance is always better than hearsay.   ROR087-088

Lord, as I wait upon You I want to hear afresh the real sound of the lute. Fill me with a firsthand knowledge of You, so that my message might always be that of an alert eyewitness. Amen.

 

Hungry and thirsty, their soul fainted in them

Hungry and thirsty, their soul fainted in them. Then they cried unto the Lord in their trouble, and He delivered them out of their distresses.—Psalm 107:5, 6.

Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness, for they shall be filled.—Matthew 5:6.

 

Thou hear’st the hungry ravens when they cry,

And to Thy children shalt thou not send bread,

Who on Thy aid alone for help rely,

And in the steps of Christ alone would tread?

They shall not cry for righteousness in vain,

But bread from heaven Thy hand shall soon supply.

Jones Very.

 

If God had not said, Blessed are those that hunger, I know not what could keep weak Christiana from sinking in despair; many times all I can do is to find and complain that I want Him, and wish to recover Him; now this is my stay, that He in mercy esteems us not only by having, but by desiring also; and, after a sort, accounts us to have that which we want and desire to have.

Joseph Hall.

 

Honest sighing is faith breathing and whispering in the ear; the life is not out of faith, where there is sighing, looking up with the eyes, and breathing toward God.

Samuel Rutherford.

 

He never yet rejected the feeble soul which clung to Him in love.

H.L. Sidney Lear.

 

We Are Not Left to Perish

“For thou wilt not leave my soul in hell; neither wilt thou suffer thine Holy One to see corruption.” Ps. 16:10

This word has its proper fulfillment in the Lord Jesus; but it applies also, with a variation, to all who are in Him. Our soul shall not be left in the separate state, and our body, though it see corruption, shall rise again. The general meaning, rather than the specific application, is that to which we would call our readers’ thoughts at this particular time.

We may descend in spirit very low till we seem to be plunged in the abyss of hell; but we shall not be left there. We may appear to be at death’s door in heart, and soul, and consciousness; but we cannot remain there. Our inward death as to joy and hope may proceed very far; but it cannot run on to its full consequences, so as to reach the utter corruption of black despair. We may go very low, but not lower than the Lord permits; we may stay in the lowest dungeon of doubt for a while, but we shall not perish there. The star of hope is still in the sky when the night is blackest. The Lord will not forget us and hand us over to the enemy. Let us rest in hope. We have to deal with One whose mercy endureth for ever. Surely, out of death, and darkness, and despair we shall yet arise to life, light, and liberty.

 

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