VIDEO The Torn Veil – Looking For That Day

The Torn Veil

We have confidence to enter the Most Holy Place by the blood of Jesus, by a new and living way opened for us through the curtain, that is, his body. Hebrews 10:19–20

It was a dark and somber day in the outskirts of Jerusalem. On a hill just outside the city walls, a Man who’d been attracting crowds of eager followers for the past three years hung in disgrace and pain on a rough wooden cross. Mourners wept and wailed in sorrow. The light of the sun no longer brightened the afternoon sky. And the intense suffering of the Man on the cross ended when He cried out in a loud voice, “It is finished” (Matthew 27:50; John 19:30).

At that very moment, another sound came from the great temple across town—the sound of ripping fabric. Miraculously, without human intervention, the huge, thick veil that separated the outer temple from the holy of holies tore in two from top to bottom (Matthew 27:51).

That torn curtain symbolized the reality of the cross: a new way was now open to God! Jesus, the Man on the cross, had shed His blood as the last sacrifice—the one true and sufficient sacrifice (Hebrews 10:10)—which allows all who believe in Him to enjoy forgiveness and enter into a relationship with God (Romans 5:6–11).

Amidst the darkness of that original Good Friday, we received the best news ever—Jesus opened a way for us to be saved from our sins and to experience fellowship with God forever (Hebrews 10:19–22). Thank God for the message of the torn veil!

By Dave Branon

Today’s Reflection

How has the reality of what happened on Good Friday brought you from darkness to light? What does it mean for you to experience a relationship with God?


Looking For That Day, Hebrews 10:19-25 – Pastor Chuck Smith – Topical Bible Study

Who Is That?

 

David said to Nathan, “I have sinned against the Lord.” Nathan replied, “The Lord has taken away your sin.” 2 Samuel 12:13

When a man installed a security camera outside his house, he checked the video feature to ensure that the system was working. He was alarmed to see a broad-shouldered figure in dark clothing wandering around his yard. He watched intently to see what the man would do. The interloper seemed familiar, however. Finally he realized he wasn’t watching a stranger roam his property, but a recording of himself in his own backyard!

What might we see if we could step out of our skin and observe ourselves in certain situations? When David’s heart was hardened and he needed an outside perspective—a godly perspective—on his involvement with Bathsheba, God sent Nathan to the rescue (2 Samuel 12).

Nathan told David a story about a rich man who robbed a poor man of his only lamb. Though the rich man owned herds of animals, he slaughtered the poor man’s lone sheep and made it into a meal. When Nathan revealed that the story illustrated David’s actions, David saw how he had harmed Uriah. Nathan explained the consequences, but more important he assured David, “The Lord has taken away your sin” (v. 13).

If God reveals sin in our lives, His ultimate purpose isn’t to condemn us, but to restore us and to help us reconcile with those we’ve hurt. Repentance clears the way for renewed closeness with God through the power of His forgiveness and grace.

By Jennifer Benson Schuldt

Today’s Reflection

What sin(s) do you need to bring to God today in repentance? How does His grace encourage you to come before Him in honesty?

A Dark Sabbath

John 19:30-42

As Jesus’ body lay in a tomb, so did the disciples’ hopes and dreams. They had left everything to follow the one they believed was the Messiah, and now He was dead. Fear, doubt, and grief must have cycled through their minds. What were they to do? Where were they to go? How could they go on without Jesus? No doubt their hearts grew sick with confusion as they contemplated these things.

The disciples’ doubts shouldn’t surprise us, because if we’re honest, we also see doubt in ourselves. The men of “little faith,” as Jesus often called them, failed to believe or remember what the Lord had said of Himself—that He would lay down His life and take it up again. In the darkness of their grief, all His promises were forgotten.

At times in our lives, it may seem that God has let us down, but ultimately we know that He will never forsake us (Heb. 13:5). But like the disciples, we’ll experience dark circumstances, which can dim our faith and dash our hopes. That’s when we most need to remember God’s promises and meditate on His faithfulness.

Often, however, when we’re facing uncertainty, all we want is an answer to our problem or relief from our pain. Therefore, we frequently try to fix it ourselves instead of trusting God and waiting for Him to act.

The disciples had to go through a dark Saturday, but when Sunday finally came, their sorrow was turned to joy. In the same way, if we are willing to wait and trust God through the darkness of night, we can rest in knowing that morning will surely come.

Among Hidden Rocks

“These are spots in your feasts of charity, when they feast with you, feeding themselves without fear.” (Jude 1:12)

The “spots” that the translators chose for this description by Jude may be better understood as “hidden rocks” just below a lake’s surface or covered over by shallow sand in a pathway. Spilas is the Greek word, not used elsewhere in the New Testament.

The feasts that Jude refers to are somewhat difficult to describe biblically since this is the only time the word agape is used in the plural. There is some evidence that the early churches were extending the time of celebration of the Lord’s Supper improperly (1 Corinthians 11:20-21), and it is probable that his warning would apply to churches who are indifferent to maintaining purity (1 Corinthians 11:27-29).

But the imagery also appears to express the danger that the “spots” present amidst the loving environment of most churches. Jude gives several insights about the character of those who would resist “the faith.” These people have established themselves as they feast and are “feeding themselves without fear.” The word choices are powerful.

The spots are suneuocheo (feeding with) and getting along very well with the rest of the church, shepherding themselves (poimaino) boldly (aphobos). This is bad! These evil men have become so entrenched that they lead their own faction with no fear of resistance or confrontation. The Lord Jesus has stern words to speak to those churches who allow biblical error to establish itself through false teachers and unconcerned leaders (Revelation 2–3).

Peter describes such people as “spots . . . and blemishes, sporting themselves with their own deceivings while they feast with you . . . that cannot cease from sin; beguiling unstable souls” (2 Peter 2:13-14). Not a pretty picture. God does not tolerate such ungodly behavior, and neither should we. HMM III

Have Confidence in Him

Now unto him that is able to do exceeding abundantly above all that we ask or think, according to the power that worketh in us, unto him be glory in the church by Christ Jesus throughout all ages, world without end. Amen.

—Ephesians 3:20-21

You can have this confidence in God, and you can have this respect for His will. Do not expect God to perform miracles for you so you can write books about them. Do not ever be caught asking God to send you toys like that to play around with.

But if you are in trouble and concerned about your situation and willing to be honest with God, you can have confidence in Him. You can go to Him in the merit of His Son, claiming His promises, and He will not let you down. God will help you, and you will find the way of deliverance.

God will move heaven and earth for you if you will trust Him.   FBR049

Thank You, Father, for the majesty of this truth. It certainly is only in the merit of Your Son, but in that merit You’ve given us a powerful promise. Thank You that You never let us down. Amen.

 

The Lord of peace Himself

The Lord of peace Himself give you peace at all times in all ways.—2 Thessalonians 3:16 (R. V.).

Thou shall hide them in the secret of Thy presence.—Psalm 31:20.

 

Let my life be hid in Thee,

Life of life and Light of light!

Love’s illimitable sea,

Depth of peace, of power the height!

 

Let my life be hid in Thee

From vexation and annoy;

Calm in Thy tranquillity,

All my mourning turned to joy.

John Bull.

 

It is small things that, just because of their smallness, distress and overset us. I mean the weight of daily care, which in their small details of personal expenditure, and in the careful routine of a household, and in the rearing of children, and in the society of friends, and in the outside duty, and in private affairs, singly and separately is sufficiently burdensome; but altogether, and on one set of shoulders, is sometimes felt to be more than the strength can bear. Those anxious lives, tempted to be fretful, and hasty, and self-important, and fussed with their incessant activities, may, if rightly interpreted, and manfully grasped, settle down into round and sunny centers of regular, and peaceful, and fruitful activities. Where there is prayer, there is peace; and God, who makes every duty possible, knows, helps, and cares.

Anthony W. Thurold

 

By Faith Not By Feeling

“The just shall live by faith.” Rom. 1:17

I shall not die. I can, I do believe in the Lord my God, and this faith will keep me alive. I would be numbered among those who in their lives are just; but even if I were perfect I would not try to live by my righteousness; I would cling to the work of the Lord Jesus, and still live by faith in Him and by nothing else. If I were able to give my body to be burned for my Lord Jesus, yet I would not trust in my own courage and constancy, but still would live by faith.

“Were I a martyr at the stake I’d plead my Saviour’s name; Intreat a pardon for His sake, And urge no other claim.”

To live by faith is a far surer and happier thing than to live by feelings or by works. The branch, by living in the vine, lives a better life than it would live by itself, even if it were possible for it to live at all apart from the stem. To live by clinging to Jesus, by deriving all from Him, is a sweet and sacred thing. If even the most just must live in this fashion, how much more must I who am a poor sinner! Lord, I believe. I must trust Thee wholly. What else can I do? Trusting Thee is my life. I feel it to be so. I will abide by this even to the end.