VIDEO Lamb of God sacrificed on Passover, Resurrected on Feast of First Fruits

Faith in Jesus that spans 2,000 years.

For the first three centuries of Christianity, Jesus’ crucifixion as the Lamb of God was observed on the Jewish Feast of Passover.

Passover was when Hebrews in Egypt killed a lamb and put the blood over the doorposts of their house so that the angel of death would pass over.

Jesus, “who taketh away the sins of the world,” was in the tomb on the Feast of Unleavened Bread. (Leaven, or yeast, is symbolic of sin, which was removed from Jewish households.)

Jesus rose from the dead on the Feast of First Fruits — “But every man in his own order: Christ the firstfruits; afterward they that are Christ’s at his coming” (I Cor. 15:23).

Sir Lionel Luckhoo, who is listed in Guinness Book of World Records as world’s most successful criminal attorney, stated:

“The bones of Muhammad are in Medina, the bones of Confucius are in Shantung, the cremated bones of Buddha are in Nepal.

Thousands pay pilgrimages to worship at their tombs which contain their bones. But in Jerusalem there is a cave cut into the rock.

This is the tomb of Jesus. IT IS EMPTY! YES, EMPTY! BECAUSE HE IS RISEN! He died, physically and historically. He arose from the dead, and now sits at the right hand of God.”

George Washington’s tomb is engraved with the Scripture, John 11:25, where Jesus told Martha:

“I am the Resurrection and the Life; sayeth the Lord. He that believeth in Me, though he were dead yet shall he live. And whosoever liveth and believeth in Me shall never die.”

Composer George Frederick Handel wrote in his masterpiece Messiah, 1742:

“I know that my Redeemer liveth.”

Martin Luther remarked:

“Our Lord has written the promise of the Resurrection not in books alone, but in every leaf in the springtime.”

John Robinson (1576-1625) was the pastor of the Pilgrims. He wrote in his Leiden letter:

“Thus this holy army of saints is marshaled here on earth by these

officers, under the conduct of their glorious Emperor, Christ.

Thus it marches in this most heavenly order and gracious array, against all enemies, both bodily and ghostly …

Thus, through the Blood of that spotless Lamb, and that Word of their testimony, they are more than conquerors, bruising the head of the Serpent; yea, through the power of His Word, they have power to cast down Satan like lightning; to tread upon serpents and scorpions; to cast down strongholds, and everything that exalteth itself against God.

The gates of hell, and all the principalities and powers on earth shall not prevail against it.”

James Logan was Secretary for William Penn, and Chief Justice of Pennsylvania’s Supreme Court, 1731-39. He stated:

“Remember thou art by profession a Christian; that is, one who art called after the immaculate Lamb of God, who, by offering Himself a sacrifice for thee, atoned for thy sins …

Rouue with the more simple servants of nature, and borrowing one hour from the sleep of sluggards, spend it in thy chamber in dressing thy soul with prayer and meditation, reading the Scriptures …

Remember that the same enemy that caused thy first parents to forfeit their blessed condition, notwithstanding the gate is now open for restoration, is perpetually using his whole endeavors to prevent thee from attaining this, and frustrate to thee the passion of thy Redeemer.”

Elias Boudinot was the President of the Continental Congress, 1782-83. A U.S. Representative from New Jersey, 1789-95, he helped frame the Bill of Rights. He was Director of the U.S. Mint under Presidents Washington and John Adams, 1795-97.

Boudinot became a genuine Christian during the Great Awakening, and was baptized by Rev. George Whitfield. He helped found the American Bible Society, stating in New Jersey, July 4, 1783:

“No sooner had the great Creator of the heavens and the earth finished His almighty work, and pronounced all very good, but He set apart … one day in seven for the commemoration of His inimitable power in producing all things out of nothing …

The deliverance of the children of Israel from a state of bondage to an unreasonable tyrant was perpetuated by the Paschal (Passover) lamb, and enjoining it on their posterity as an annual festival forever …

The resurrection of the Savior of mankind is commemorated by keeping the first day of the week …

Let us then, my friends and fellow citizens, unite all our endeavors this day to remember, with reverential gratitude to our Supreme Benefactor, all the wonderful things He has done for us, in our miraculous deliverance from a second Egypt-another house of bondage.”

Charles Haddon Spurgeon stated in his sermon “The Leafless Tree,” March 8, 1857, New Park Street Chapel:

“If we read the Scripture’s aright the Jews have a great deal to do with this world’s history.

They shall be gathered in; Messiah shall come, the Messiah they are looking for, the same Messiah who came once shall come again, shall come as they expected him to come the first time.

They then thought he would come a prince to reign over them, and so he will when he comes again.

He will come to be king of the Jews, and to reign over his people most gloriously; for when he comes Jew and Gentile shall have equal privileges, though there shall yet be some distinction afforded to that royal family from whose loins Jesus came; for he shall sit upon the throne of his father David, and unto him shall be gathered all nations.”

In his Easter Address, April 2, 1983, President Ronald Reagan stated:

“This week Jewish families and friends have been celebrating Passover …

Its observance reminds all of us that the struggle for freedom and the battle against oppression waged by the Jews since ancient times is one shared by people everywhere.

And Christians have been commemorating the last momentous days leading to the crucifixion of Jesus 1,950 years ago. Tomorrow, as morning spreads around the planet, we’ll celebrate the triumph of life over death, the Resurrection of Jesus …”

Reagan continued:

“Both observances tell of sacrifice and pain but also of hope and triumph …

Men and women around the world who love God and freedom – bear a message of world hope and brotherhood like the rites of Passover and Easter that we celebrate this weekend …

We want peace … And then they ask, ‘Do you think that we can have these things one day?’ Well, I do. I really do.

Nearly 2,000 years after the coming of the Prince of Peace, such simple wishes may still seem far from fulfillment. But we can achieve them. We must never stop trying.”

President Donald Trump stated March 31, 2018:

“My fellow Americans, at this holy time of the year families across our nation gather in homes, churches, and synagogues to light candles and to praise God.

During the sacred holiday of Passover, Jewish families around the world give thanks to God for liberating the Jewish people from bondage in Egypt and for delivering them to the Promised Land of Israel.

For Christians, we remember the suffering and death of God’s only Son and his glorious resurrection on the third day.

On Easter Sunday, we proclaim with joy … Christ is Risen!

Both of these sacred celebrations remind us that God’s love redeems the world. Almost 3,000 years ago, the prophet Isaiah wrote, ‘Darkness covers the earth, but the Lord rises upon you and his Glory appears over you. For the Lord will be your everlasting light.’

In America, we look to the light of God to guide our steps. We trust in the power of the Almighty for wisdom and strength. And we praise our Heavenly Father for the blessings of freedom and the gift of eternal life.

Happy Passover. Happy Easter. Thank you. God bless you and God bless America.”

Well-known British journalist Malcolm Muggeridge wrote in his 1975 work titled “Jesus”:

“As Man alone, Jesus could not have saved us; as God alone, he would not; Incarnate, he could and did.”

In his Easter Message, April 2015, British Prime Minister David Cameron stated:

“The values of the Bible, the values of Christianity are the values that we need – values of compassion, of respect, of responsibility, of tolerance.

Now … you don’t have to be a Christian … to have strong values, to believe in strong values or to pass those values on to your children, but the point I always make is that it helps.

We’re always trying to tell our children not to be selfish, but is there a better way of putting it than ‘love thy neighbor’?…”

Cameron continued:

“We’re always telling our children to be tolerant … but is there a better way of explaining tolerance than saying, ‘do to others as you would be done by’?

It’s the simplest encapsulation of an absolutely vital value and the Christian church and the teaching of the Bible has put it so clearly.

We’re always telling our children that they must make the most of what they have; they must not waste what they have been given, and is there a better way of putting that than ‘don’t hide your light under a bushel, make the most of your talents.'”

Spanish King Felipe VI stated December 13, 2016:

“Europe needs … to be honest and respectful to both our common Judeo-Christian values and origins.”

Former German Chancellor Helmut Kohl wrote in the foreword of the Hungarian translation of his book Out of Concern for Europe: An Appeal:

“Europe cannot be the new home for millions of people in need … (as many refugees come) from different cultural backgrounds.

They follow in significant part, faiths other than Judeo-Christianity, which is one of the foundations of our values and social order.”

In an Easter address in St. Peter’s Square, April 1, 1956, Pope Pius XII stated:

“This year’s celebration of Easter should be primarily a recall to faith in Christ, addressed to people who, through no fault of their own, are still unaware of the saving work of the Redeemer;

to those who, on the contrary, would wish to have His name wiped out of the minds and hearts of nations;

and finally, in a special manner, to those souls of little faith who, seduced by deceptive enticements, are on the point of exchanging the priceless Christian values for those of a false earthly progress.”

John Milton Hay was private secretary to President Lincoln and ambassador to Great Britain under President McKinley.

He negotiated over 50 treaties while Secretary of State, 1898-1905, including the Open-Door policy with China; the Panama Canal; the Alaskan boundary; the Philippine policy.

John Milton Hay, while he worked for the New York Tribune, 1870-1875, published the poem:

SINAI AND CALVARY

But Calvary stands to ransom

The earth from utter loss;

In shade than light more glorious

The shadow of the Cross.

To heal a sick world’s trouble,

To soothe its woe and pain,

On Calvary’s sacred summit

The Pascal (Passover) Lamb was slain.

Almighty God! direct us

To keep Thy perfect Law!

O blessed Savior, help us

Nearer to Thee to draw!

Let Sinai’s thunder aid us

To guard our feet from sin,

And Calvary’s light inspire us

The love of God to win.

Philanthropist George Hay Stuart (1816-1890) served as the president of the United States Christian Commission, which was formed out of the YMCA (Young Men’s Christian Association) in New York, November 14, 1861.

During the Civil War, the United States Christian Commission raised millions of dollars in private donations to provide supplies, hospital stores and clothing to the army and navy.

George Hay Stuart helped distribute over 30 million gospel tracts and New Testaments to the soldiers. One of the workers was D.L. Moody, who later became a world renowned minister.

George Hay Stuart stated:

“I have prayed for this union; and I have labored for it, simply because I believed that it would bring glory to my blessed Lord and Master, Jesus Christ …

I have labored and prayed for it, because it would bring brethren together, now unhappily divided, to see eye to eye, that the nations that have so long bowed down to idols might learn of Jesus and Him crucified …

Since these twenty-four hours have passed away eighty-six thousand four hundred immortal souls have gone to the judgment seat of Christ …

I never hear the funeral bell toll without asking myself the question, ‘What have I done to point that departed soul to the Lamb of God that died to save a perishing world?’

Brethren, buckle on your armor for a great conflict; buckle it on for giving the glorious Gospel of the Son of God to the millions of the earth who are perishing for lack of knowledge.”

Robert Morris Page (1903-1992), known as the “father of U.S. Radar,” was the physicist who invented pulsation radar used for the detection of aircraft.

The holder of 37 patents, Robert Morris Pages served with the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C.; received the U.S. Navy Distinguished Civilian Service Award; the Presidential Certificate of Merit; the IRE Fellowship Harry Diamond Memorial Award; as well as the Stuart Ballantyne Medal of the Franklin Institute.

The son of a Methodist minister, Robert Morris Page wrote:

“The authenticity of the writings of the prophets, though the men themselves are human, is established by such things as the prediction of highly significant events far in the future that could be accomplished only through a knowledge obtained from a realm which is not subject to the laws of time as we know them.

One of the great evidences is the long series of prophecies concerning Jesus the Messiah.

These prophecies extend hundreds of years prior to the birth of Christ.

They include a vast amount of detail concerning Christ himself, His nature and the things He would do when He came-things which to the natural world, or the scientific world, remain to this day completely inexplicable.”

The Democrat Party’s candidate for President in 1896, 1900, and 1908 was William Jennings Bryan.

Memorialized with a statue in the U.S. Capitol’s Statuary Hall, William Jennings Bryan gave over 600 public speeches during his Presidential campaigns, the most famous being “The Prince of Peace,” printed in the New York Times, September 7, 1913, in which he stated:

“The world had known love before … but Jesus gave a new definition of love. His love was as wide as the sea; its limits were so far-flung that even an enemy could not travel beyond its bounds.

Other teachers sought to regulate the lives of their followers by rule and formula, but Christ’s plan was to purify the heart and then to leave love to direct the footsteps …”

Bryan continued:

“What conclusion is to be drawn from the life, the teachings and the death of this historic figure?

Reared in a carpenter shop; with no knowledge of literature, save Bible literature; with no acquaintance with philosophers living or with the writings of sages dead, when only about thirty years old He gathered disciples about Him, promulgated a higher code of morals than the world had ever known before, and proclaimed Himself the Messiah.

He taught and performed miracles for a few brief months and then was crucified; His disciples were scattered and many of them put to death; His claims were disputed, His resurrection denied and His followers persecuted;

and yet from this beginning His religion spread until hundreds of millions have taken His name with reverence upon their lips and millions have been willing to die rather than surrender the faith which He put into their hearts …”

William Jennings Bryan concluded:

“How shall we account for Him?

Here is the greatest fact of history; here is One who has with increasing power, for nineteen hundred years, molded the hearts, the thoughts and the lives of men, and He exerts more influence to-day than ever before.

‘What think ye of Christ?’ It is easier to believe Him divine than to explain in any other way what he said and did and was. And I have greater faith, even than before.”

After comments on divine inspiration, George Washington Carver was criticized in a New York Times editorial, November 20, 1924. Receiving an encouraging letter, he replied to Rev. Lyman Ward, January 15, 1925:

“My dear Bro. Ward, Many, many thanks for your letter of Jan. 4th. How it lifted up my very soul, and made me to feel that after all God moves in a mysterious way His wonders to perform.

I did indeed feel very badly for a while, not that the cynical criticism was directed at me, but rather at the religion of Jesus Christ. Dear Bro. I know that my Redeemer liveth.”

https://historymaven.io/americanminute/world-history/lamb-of-god-sacrificed-on-passover-resurrected-on-feast-of-first-fruits-b5U2KBDbBE23ZWuY8tmeQA/


THE FEAST OF FIRST FRUITS


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Seeing the Light

On those living in the land of deep darkness a light has dawned. Isaiah 9:2

 

On the streets of Los Angeles, a homeless man struggling with addictions stepped into The Midnight Mission and asked for help. Thus began Brian’s long road to recovery.

In the process Brian rediscovered his love for music. Eventually he joined Street Symphony—a group of music professionals with a heart for the homeless. They asked Brian to perform a solo from Handel’s Messiah known as “The People That Walked in Darkness.” In words written by the prophet Isaiah during a dark period of Israel’s history, he sang, “The people that walked in darkness have seen a great light: they that dwell in the land of the shadow of death, upon them hath the light shined” (Isaiah 9:2 kjv). A music critic for The New Yorker magazine wrote that Brian “made the text sound as though it had been taken from his own life.”

The gospel writer Matthew quoted that same passage. Called by Jesus from a life of cheating his fellow Israelites, Matthew describes how Jesus fulfilled Isaiah’s prophecy by taking His salvation “beyond the Jordan” to “Galilee of the Gentiles” (Matthew 4:13–15).

Who would have believed one of Caesar’s tax collector thugs (see Matthew 9:9), a street addict like Brian, or people like us would get a chance to show the difference between light and darkness in our own lives?

By Mart DeHaan

Reflect & Pray

How has the light of Christ affected you? In what ways are you reflecting it to others?

Is Your Faith Genuine?

Matthew 7:13-27

During my first pastorate in the mountains of North Carolina, I traveled throughout the area meeting people, telling them about the Lord, and inviting them to church. They all claimed to believe in Jesus even though many had no interest in church or the Bible and their lives showed no evidence of salvation. I feared that whatever faith they had would not take them to heaven.

Believing in vain is probably more common in the church than we’d care to admit. Some people assume they are Christians simply because they were raised in a Christian family or have attended church since childhood. Sometimes they merely believe the facts about Jesus in the same way that they’re confident George Washington existed.

However, there are also many people who deliberately limit what they believe about Christ and His Word. They don’t want a faith that requires them to forsake their sins and change their lifestyle. If asked what they believe, they may respond that their faith is a private matter.

Other people have been led to think they are saved because of an experience. They may have heard a nebulous invitation to make Jesus a part of their life, or perhaps an encounter at a conference made them feel close to God.

Today’s passage is a sobering warning. How can we be certain that our faith is genuine and our salvation is sure? Jesus said the proof lies in our obedience to God’s Word. If we are in Christ, then as He works to conform us to His image, the evidence will be displayed in our character, conduct, and conversation.

More Sure Word

“We have also a more sure word of prophecy; whereunto ye do well that ye take heed, as unto a light that shineth in a dark place, until the day dawn, and the day star arise in your hearts.” (2 Peter 1:19)

In this important passage, Peter explains the ultimate source of his writings. He did not merely repeat cunningly devised fables when he taught majestic things about the Lord Jesus Christ, but was himself an “eyewitness” of His glory and personally heard the very voice of God on the Mount of Transfiguration (vv. 16-18). The three chosen disciples witnessed His prophesied glory and heard God speak of Christ’s pleasing Sonship. There could be no doubt of God’s special plan for His Son. As eyewitnesses, they bore the onus of bearing witness to the facts.

But Peter downplayed the importance of his own personal testimony, even though it was a firsthand account and quite important, and he knew it was absolutely correct. The “more sure word of prophecy” he recommended, however, which outshines any human testimony, was the written Word of God, for the Transfiguration confirmed numerous Old Testament prophecies concerning Christ. Prophecies already fulfilled multiply our confidence in the rest of Scripture.

Oral or written testimony of human observers, no matter how trustworthy they may be, is still subject to human error and not “inerrant” in the same way as Scripture. Christians must always remember that the written Word of God is more certain than personal memories or impressions. The experiences we have must never be viewed as validating God’s Word. Rather, God’s Word validates our experiences. The early church only had a few portions of the New Testament in those days of beginning, but thankfully, we have it all and have ready access to it. Peter recognized it as superior to any personal testimony. How much more should we deem it trustworthy and authoritative? JDM

Whole Life of Prayer

If ye abide in me, and my words abide in you, ye shall ask what ye will, and it shall be done unto you.

—John 15:7

Prayer at its best is the expression of the total life….

All things else being equal, our prayers are only as powerful as our lives. In the long pull we pray only as well as we live….

Most of us in moments of stress have wished that we had lived so that prayer would not be so unnatural to us and have regretted that we had not cultivated prayer to the point where it would be as easy and as natural as breathing….

Undoubtedly the redemption in Christ Jesus has sufficient moral power to enable us to live in a state of purity and love where our whole life will be a prayer. Individual acts of prayer that spring out of that kind of total living will have about them a wondrous power not known to the careless or the worldly Christian.   ROR081-083

Lord, the real key here is that there is “sufficient moral power” available. In my own strength I fail, but thank You for Your enabling power. Amen.

 

Blessed is he that considereth the weak

And as thy servant was busy here and there, he was gone.—1 Kings 20:40.

Blessed is he that considereth the weak; Jehovah will deliver him in the day of evil.—Psalm 41:1 (R. V.).

Encourage the faint-hearted, support the weak, be lung-suffering toward all.—1 Thessalonians 5:14 (R. V.).

 

It is decreed in the providence of God that, although the opportunities for doing good, which are in the power of every man, are beyond count or knowledge; yet, the opportunity once neglected, no man by any self-sacrifice can atone for those who have fallen or suffered by his negligence.

Juliana H. Ewing.

 

Do not make life hard to any.

R.W. Emerson.

 

Forgive us if this day we have done or said anything to increase the pain of the world. Pardon the unkind word, the impatient gesture, the hard and selfish deed, the failure to show sympathy and kindly help where we had the opportunity, but missed it; and enable us so to live that we may daily do something to lessen the tide of human sorrow, and add to the sum of human happiness.

F.B. Meyer.

 

Have No Fear of Death

“He that hath an ear, let him hear what the Spirit saith unto the churches; he that overcometh shall not be hurt of the second death.” Rev. 2:11

The first death we must endure unless the Lord should suddenly come to His temple. For this let us abide in readiness, awaiting it without fear, since Jesus has transformed death from a dreary cavern into a passage leading to glory.

The thing to be feared is not the first, but the second death; not the parting of the soul from the body, but the final separation of the entire man from God. This is death indeed. This death kills all peace, joy, happiness, hope. When God is gone all is gone. Such a death is far worse than ceasing to be: it is existence without the life which makes existence worth the having.

Now, if by God’s grace we fight on to the end, and conquer in the glorious war, no second death can lay its chill finger upon us. We shall have no fear of death and hell, for we shall receive a crown of life which fadeth not away. How this nerves us for the fight! Eternal life is worth a life’s battle. To escape the hurt of the second death is a thing worth struggling for throughout a lifetime.

Lord, give us faith, so that we may overcome, and then grant us grace to remain unharmed though sin and Satan dog our heels!