VIDEO καλό Πάσχα Kalo Pascha – Calculate Dates for Greek Easter – Protestant Learns

How the Dates for Greek Easter Are Calculated

Dec 24, 2018

 

Good Friday procession of Epitaphio through streets in Saronida, Attica, Greece

 

For those wondering if Greek Easter and Western Easter are celebrated on the same day, the answer is sometimes. Before planning your trip to Greece, check out the dates through 2023.

How is Greek Easter calculated? 

The day is governed by these three main conditions:

  • It must be based on the Julian calendar, not the Gregorian calendar;
  • It must be after the Jewish holiday of Passover;
  • It must be on the first Sunday after the first full moon after the Spring Equinox, which for this purpose is fixed as March 21st, but which may occur on the 20th or 22nd.

For an intense discussion of calculating Easter in general, with a short section on the special difficulties of calculating Greek Easter, see Claus Tondering’s Calendar FAQ.

The Short Answer – Why Western and Eastern Easter Are Different

The basic reason for the difference between the two Easters is that “Western” Easter uses a different set of calculations based on the current Gregorian calendar created by Pope Gregory instead of the ancient Julian one, first used under the Roman emperor Julian. Under the Gregorian system, Easter can actually be in March, something that will not happen with the Julian-based method of calculating Easter.

Traveling in Greece during Easter? Be Careful

When finding out about “Easter Specials” in Greece, be cautious. Some islands with a partly Catholic population and many hotels will be offering specials on both dates, so be sure it’s the one you want at the time of your visit. Go by the actual dates rather than saying something like “I’ll be there Easter weekend!” Greeks will generally assume you mean Greek Easter, but many foreign travel agents may assume you mean Western Easter. And then, of course, there are some years when they really are the same, confusing things even more thoroughly.

Missed Easter? You May Be in Time for Pentecost

If you missed Easter in Greece, the observance of Pentecost offers some nice events and ceremonies at a more tourist-friendly time of year. There will be church ceremonies and on many islands and in small towns open feasts with special foods and celebrations. The Greek island of Milos is noted for its Pentecost observances, and some Greek travel agents arrange special trips to the island at this time of year. As with many Greek religious events, the previous evening is the most vivid for the visitor.

But all Greek Orthodox churches will be marking the day in some way.

https://www.tripsavvy.com/easter-in-greece-faqs-1525736


A Protestant Learns About Greek Orthodoxy


Related

https://stopandpraytv.wordpress.com/2015/04/12/video-χριστός-ἀνέστη-christos-anesti/

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God’s Retirement Plan

The angel of the Lord appeared to [Moses] in flames of fire from within a bush. Exodus 3:2

 

Archaeologist Dr. Warwick Rodwell was preparing to retire when he made an extraordinary discovery at Lichfield Cathedral in England. As builders carefully excavated part of the floor of the church to make way for a retractable base, they discovered a sculpture of the archangel Gabriel, thought to be 1,200 years old. Dr. Rodwell’s retirement plans were put on hold as his find launched him into an exciting and busy new season.

Moses was eighty years old when he made a fiery discovery that would forever alter his life. Though the adopted son of an Egyptian princess, he never forgot his Hebrew lineage and raged at the injustice he witnessed against his kinsmen (Exodus 2:11–12). When Pharaoh learned that Moses had killed an Egyptian who was beating a Hebrew, he planned to have him killed, forcing Moses to flee to Midian, where he settled (vv. 13–15).

Forty years later, when he was eighty, Moses was tending his father-in-law’s flock when “the angel of the Lord appeared to him in flames of fire from within a bush. Moses saw that though the bush was on fire it did not burn up” (3:2). In that moment, God called Moses to lead the Israelites out of Egyptian slavery (vv. 3–22).

At this moment in your life, what might God be calling you to do for His greater purpose? What new plans has He placed in your path?

By Ruth O’Reilly-Smith

Reflect & Pray

What do you learn from Moses and his calling from God? Why is it vital to be open to something new He’s doing in your life?

Holy God, be Lord of all my days as I surrender them to You afresh.

From the Bottom Up

1 Samuel 30:1-6

King David’s psalms reveal that he faced some very lonely times. However, few experiences compared to his utter despair over the ashes of his city, Ziklag. The story of how he reached such anguished depths actually began much earlier—at a time when his faith failed.

After years of fleeing from King Saul’s death threats, David was discouraged and weary. He’d believed God’s promise to make him king, but now his certainty began to waver. So he did what many of us do—he resorted to human reasoning. Under the circumstances, it appeared his best option was to seek refuge among the Philistines, who were enemies of Israel (1 Samuel 27:1). Blinded by his seemingly hopeless situation, David stepped out of God’s will in order to get beyond Saul’s reach. His lapse may have been just temporary, but it nonetheless proved significant, in that he stopped believing God could guide him safely through “the valley of the shadow of death” (Psalm 23:4).

Several months later, the future king returned to Ziklag to find that the city had been ruined. Even worse, his family and his people had been taken. David’s band of warriors prepared to take out their frustration and anger on him. From the bottom of this pit of despair, a humbled man looked to God and found his strength and his faith renewed (1 Samuel 30:6).

At our lowest points, we can be tempted to stop trusting in the Lord and instead take matters into our own hands. But when we do, it’s easy to wind up in a mess. The good news is that even in a mess, if we look to the Lord, we will see the way out of our pit and back into His will.

Abounding Life

“And God is able to make all grace abound toward you; that ye, always having all sufficiency in all things, may abound to every good work.” (2 Corinthians 9:8)

Jesus said, “I am come that they might have life, and that they might have it more abundantly” (John 10:10). This well-known promise is sometimes misapplied, being interpreted to mean that the Christian life would normally be a life of material prosperity, popularity, and happiness. The words “abundantly,” “abounding,” and similar terms are all based on the same Greek word, which does, indeed, mean “abundant.” But it can apply to sorrow as well as happiness.

The Christian life, as our text indicates, should be abundant in good works for the simple reason that God’s saving and keeping grace has been manifested abundantly toward us. Having been “stablished in the faith,” we are to be “abounding therein” (Colossians 2:7). Christians, of course, should also “abound in love.” “And the Lord make you to increase and abound in love one toward another, and toward all men, even as we do toward you” (1 Thessalonians 3:12).

But the Christian may also experience much sorrow and difficulty in his life. Paul was a classic example: “. . . in labours more abundant, in stripes above measure, in prisons more frequent, in deaths oft” (2 Corinthians 11:23). One may also abound in poverty. For the Christians at Philippi, for example, “in a great trial of affliction the abundance of their joy and their deep poverty abounded unto the riches of their liberality” (2 Corinthians 8:2). An abundance of suffering for the believer can always be overbalanced by God’s abounding grace. “For as the sufferings of Christ abound in us, so our consolation also aboundeth by Christ” (2 Corinthians 1:5). Our God of all grace “is able to do exceeding abundantly above all that we ask or think, according to the power that worketh in us” (Ephesians 3:20). HMM

By the hearing of the ear

I have heard of thee by the hearing of the ear: but now mine eye seem thee. Wherefore I abhor myself, and repent in dust and ashes.

—Job 42:5-6

Within the past few years, for instance, Christ has been popularized by some so-called evangelicals as one who, if a proper amount of prayer were made, would help the pious prize fighter to knock another fighter unconscious in the ring. Christ is also said to help the big league pitcher to get the proper hook on his curve. In another instance He assists an athletically-minded parson to win the high jump, and still another not only to come in first in a track meet but to set a new record in the bargain. He is said also to have helped a praying businessman to beat out a competitor in a deal, to underbid a rival and to secure a coveted contract to the discomfiture of someone else who was trying to get it. He is even thought to lend succor to a praying movie actress while she plays a role so lewd as to bring the blood to the face of a professional prostitute.

Thus our Lord becomes the Christ of utility, a kind of Aladdin’s lamp to do minor miracles in behalf of anyone who summons Him to do his bidding.   ROR024

Lord, help me not to demean the person of Christ or the sovereignty of God with this cheap sham of prayer. Amen.

 

Jesus stood still, and commanded him

Jesus stood still, and commanded him to be called.—Mark 10:49.

 

As we meet and touch, each day,

The many travelers on our way,

Let every such brief contact be

A glorious, helpful ministry;

The contact of the soil and seed,

Each giving to the other’s need,

Each helping on the other’s best,

And blessing, each, as well as blest.

Susan Coolidge.

 

Do we not sometimes feel, in trial or perplexity, that others might help us if they would only stop and listen? But they will not, and in their constant hurry we know it is little use to speak. Let us note the lesson for ourselves, and give what we ask,—leisure to hear, attentive, concentrated, not divided,—calm, patient consideration. It may be our busy work, as we think, for the Master, which so overcrowds our lives that we have not time for this “standing still.” Sad eyes meet ours, but we cannot stay to read their story. Some look to us for help in battles which we fought long ago, but we cannot turn aside to see how it fares with them in the strife, or to whisper the secret of victory. But He would have said, even though some plans of our own for His service were put aside, “Ye have done it unto Me.”

H. Bowman.

 

When It Becomes Mutual

“I will dwell in them, and walk in them; and I will be their God, and they shall be my people.” 2Cor. 6:16

Here is a mutual interest. Each belongs to each. God is the portion of His people, and the chosen people are the portion of their God. The saints find in God their chief possession, and He reckons them to be His peculiar treasure. What a mine of comfort lies in this fact for each believer!

This happy condition of mutual interest leads to mutual consideration. God will always think of His own people, and they will always think of Him. This day my God will perform all things for me; what can I do for Him? My thoughts ought to run toward Him, for He thinketh upon me. Let me make sure that it is so, and not be content with merely admitting that so it ought to be.

This, again, leads to mutual fellowship. God dwells in us, and we dwell in Him; He walks with us and we walk with God. Happy communion this!

Oh, for grace to treat the Lord as my God: to trust Him and to serve Him, as His Godhead deserves! Oh, that I could love, worship, adore, and obey Jehovah in spirit and in truth! this is my heart’s desire. When I shall attain to it, I shall have found my Heaven. Lord, help me! Be my God in helping me to know thee as my God, for Jesus’ sake.