VIDEO Bringing Back The Black Robed Regiment

Truth in History

 

British loyalist Peter Oliver called them the Black Regiment and the British blamed them for stirring up the colonists. They preached politics from their pulpits and some of them actually led the men of their congregations off to war. It cannot be overstated – they were critical to the success of the War for Independence in 1776.

Who were these men? They were America’s “patriot preachers” – some of the most outspoken proponents of truth and liberty in 18th century America. Yet, most modern American pastors haven’t even heard of them. In this presentation, Oklahoma pastor and State Representative, Dan Fisher, gives a brief history of these Patriot Preachers. Convinced that the Bible impacted every area of life – including politics, these brave pastors stood in their pulpits each Sunday wearing their black robes, preaching from God’s Word about spiritual and civil liberty. Because of their willingness to preach the “whole counsel” of God, their congregations were well prepared when the inevitable clash with the British came. Hated by the British who called them the “Black Regiment,” these courageous men “laid it all on the altar” for freedom.

Though largely forgotten today, their willingness to lead the men of their congregations onto the battlefields of our War of Independence to defend truth and liberty is one of the most inspiring stories in American history. Without their bold stand and brave deeds, America may never have come to be.

Without an “awakening” in today’s pulpit, Dan believes America will not survive. Thus, his clarion call is that it is time, past time, to Bring Back the Black Robed Regiment.

 

 

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Minister of Loneliness

Keep on loving one another as brothers and sisters.  Hebrews 13:1

 

Following her husband’s death, Betsy has spent most days in her flat, watching television and boiling tea for one. She’s not alone in her loneliness. More than nine million Brits (15 percent of the population) say they often or always feel lonely, and Great Britain has appointed a minister of loneliness to find out why and how to help.

Some causes of loneliness are well known: We move too often to put down roots. We believe we can take care of ourselves, and we don’t have a reason to reach out. We’re separated by technology—each of us immersed in our own flickering screens.

I feel the dark edge of loneliness, and you may too. This is one reason we need fellow believers. Hebrews concludes its deep discussion of Jesus’s sacrifice by encouraging us to meet together continually (10:25). We belong to the family of God, so we’re to love “one another as brothers and sisters” and “show hospitality to strangers” (13:1–2). If we each made an effort, everyone would feel cared for.

Lonely people may not return our kindness, but this is no reason to give up. Jesus has promised to never leave nor forsake us (13:5), and we can use His friendship to fuel our love for others. Are you lonely? What ways can you find to serve the family of God? The friends you make in Jesus last forever, through this life and beyond.

By Mike Wittmer

Reflect & Pray

Who needs your friendship? How might you serve someone in your church or neighborhood this week?

The family of God is intended to be the answer to loneliness.

God’s Ways Revealed

1 Corinthians 2:6-16

Just when we think we’re growing in our understanding of God, something happens that causes us to wonder if we know Him very well at all. Perhaps it was an unanswered prayer request, an accident, an illness, or some loss that shook our faith. What are we to think when the events in our life seem to contradict our understanding of God?

This basic truth may sound paradoxical, but we’re wise to keep it in the forefront of our thinking: We have a God who is far beyond human comprehension, yet He wants us to know Him and understand His ways. Even the apostle Paul—who had an intimate relationship with God—exclaimed, “How unsearchable are His judgments and unfathomable His ways! For who has known the mind of the Lord?” (Rom. 11:33-34).

So how can we know our unfathomable God? The only way is if He reveals Himself to us—and that’s exactly what He has done. Every believer is indwelt by the Holy Spirit “so that we may know the things freely given to us by God” (1 Corinthians 2:12). That’s why the apostle Paul said, “We have the mind of Christ” (1 Corinthians 2:16). Although we’ll never know or understand all that God does, we can be confident that as we read the Scriptures and walk in obedience to the Holy Spirit, He will teach us God’s ways.

We have a priceless treasure within us. The Spirit is the only reason we can understand spiritual concepts that are hidden from those who don’t know Jesus. But with this privilege comes the responsibility to let God’s Word dwell richly within us, because that’s how the Spirit teaches us the Father’s ways.

Marvel Not At The Two Imperatives

“Marvel not that I said unto thee, Ye must be born again.” (John 3:7)

The term “born again” has come into such common use in recent years, even in political campaigns, that its tremendous meaning has been all but lost. But Jesus—who ought to know, being none other than God incarnate—said, “Ye must be born again!” Furthermore, He said it to Nicodemus, one of the most religiously knowledgeable people of that day.

He did not say to Nicodemus that “they must be born again,” meaning the unbelieving multitudes who were not as instructed in the things of God as they should be. Nor did he say that “we must be born again,” meaning all of us mortals including Himself. Rather, Jesus said, “Ye must be born again!”

Even a man like Nicodemus must be born spiritually—born again (literally, “born from above”)—if he were ever to see the Kingdom of God (John 3:3). In answer to his question as to how this could be, Jesus said he must be born of the Spirit, supernaturally. But Nicodemus—as well as each of us—was born a sinner and was still a sinner, even failing to recognize Christ as Son of man and Son of God. How could he be born again? The answer is in a second imperative: “And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, even so must the Son of man be lifted up: That whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have eternal life” (John 3:14-15). If “ye must be born again,” then “even so must the Son of man be lifted up.” Christ must die for our sins before it can ever be possible that a lost sinner can be born again. Since Jesus Christ was lifted up on the cross to die for us, our burden of sin has also been lifted up and placed on Him. If we would enter God’s Kingdom, we must be born again through faith in Him! There is no other way! HMM

Rationalism Can Be Deadly

And my speech and my preaching as not with enticing words of man’s wisdom, but in demonstration of the Spirit and of power: that your faith should not stand in the wisdom of men, but in the power of God.

—1 Corinthians 2:4-5

There is today an evangelical rationalism not unlike the rationalism taught by the scribes and Pharisees. They said the truth is in the word, and if you want to know the truth, go to the rabbi and learn the word. If you get the word, you have the truth….

But revelation is not enough! There must be illumination before revelation can get to a person’s soul. It is not enough that I hold an inspired book in my hands. I must have an inspired heart. There is the difference, in spite of the evangelical rationalist who insists that revelation is enough….

In His day, Christ’s conflict was with the theological rationalist. It revealed itself in the Sermon on the Mount and in the whole book of John. Just as Colossians argues against Manichaeism and Galatians argues against Jewish legalism, so the book of John is a long, inspired, passionately outpoured book trying to save us from evangelical rationalism—the doctrine that says the text is enough. Textualism is as deadly as liberalism.   FBR021, 023-024

Lord, I believe strongly in the inspiration and authority of the Scriptures: I am committed to expository preaching. I see the danger and pray that You might keep me from this error of textualism. Amen.

 

They seek a country

They that say such things declare plainly that they seek a country.—Hebrews 11:14.

For our citizenship is in heaven.—Philippians 3:20 (R. V.).

 

Green are the fields of the earth, holy and sweet her joys;

Take, and taste, and be glad—as fruit and blossom and

bird,

But still as an exile, Soul; then, hey, with a singing voice,

For the stars and sun and sweet heaven, whose ultimate

height is the Lord!

Ripe, lovely, and glad, you shall grow in the light of His

face and His word.

Katherine Tynan Hinkson.

 

Stand still awhile, and seriously consider the noble end for which thou wast created, and for which God hath placed thee in this world! Thou wast not created for time and the creature, but for God and eternity, and to employ thyself with God and eternity. And thou art in the world, to the end that thou mayest again seek God, and His countenance which giveth blessedness, from which thou hast turned thyself away by sin; in order that thou mayest become thoroughly sanctified and enlightened, and that God may have joy, delight, peace, and pleasure in thee, and thou in God.

Gerhard Tersteegen.

 

That prayer taught by the saints, “Make me reach, my God, the degree of holiness to which Thou didst call me in creating me!”

Lady Georgian A. Fullerton.

 

FACT: Fear Only God

“So that we may boldly say, The Lord is my helper, and I will not fear what man shall do unto me.” Heb. 13:6

Because God will never leave nor forsake us, we may well be content with such things as we have. Since the Lord is ours, we cannot be left without a friend, a treasure, and a dwelling-place. This assurance may make us feel quite independent of men. Under such high patronage we do not feel tempted to cringe before our fellowmen, and ask of them permission to call our lives our own; but what we say we boldly say, and defy contradiction.

He who fears God has nothing else to fear. We should stand in such awe of the living Lord that all the threats that can be used by the proudest persecutor should have no more effect upon us than the whistling of the wind. Man in these days cannot do so much against us as he could when the apostle wrote the verse at the head of this page. Racks and stakes are out of fashion. Giant Pope cannot burn the pilgrims now. If the followers of false teachers try cruel mockery and scorn, we do not wonder at it, for the men of this world cannot love the heavenly seed. What then? We must bear the world’s scorn. It breaks no bones. God helping us, let us be bold, and when the world rages let it rage, but let us not fear it.