VIDEO Only Two Things Protect America: The Grace of Almighty God and the US Military

Charlies Daniels in Iraq in 2016. (Charlie Daniels Band Photo)

In my youth, the holiday we celebrate this weekend was known as Decoration Day, which started in 1861 when a bouquet was placed on a Civil War veteran’s grave and continued as America paid homage and tribute to the men and women who paid the ultimate price in defense of America by “decorating” or placing flowers on the graves of fallen heroes.

The name was changed to Memorial Day and became a federal holiday in 1971.

America has lost over one million in our combined wars, and, by whatever name, it is appropriate and noble that we should set aside a day to honor their memory, their service and their sacrifice.

To be a true patriot, at least in my opinion, we must appreciate the terrible price our country and its people have paid to become the greatest nation the world has ever known, and we must acknowledge and honor all those who have served in our military and pay special tribute to the ones who gave their all.

We should never forget the warriors who lost their lives to win America’s independence, defeating what, at that time, was the mightiest army and navy on earth, the British. Outgunned, outmanned, barefoot and hungry, they fought on, buried where they fell – their graves unknown and their families never knowing what happened to them.

The Civil War was responsible for the deaths of over five hundred thousand men, many dying and buried in swamps and on mountains, and in deep woods and tiny villages without any markings to identify them.

For them and all the other heroes who have died in combat – their bodies lost in heat of battle – the president lays a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier symbolizing honor to all those who died and were lost in the fog of war.

I remember my mother taking me to church early on June 6, 1944, where the building was packed to the rafters with people who had come to pray for the troops, who at that moment were storming the beaches of Normandy, running into the artillery and machine gun fire that cut so many to ribbons.

Yet, on they came, wave after wave, until, at the end of D-Day, the Nazis back was broken, and the March to Berlin was on.

They called it “The Longest Day,” but it was also the bloodiest day, as there were an estimated 209,000 Allied casualties, including ground and air forces.

This weekend, we honor their memory.

The Vietnam War, the Gulf Wars, the War on Terror, skirmishes, the raids and rescues, and the covert missions we never even knew or know about have all cost the lives of brave men and women who were willing to stand between America and her enemies.

It’s frustrating these days when we have people who are obviously enemies of America and our ally, Israel, serving in the halls of power. It is also frustrating when elected officials put their personal feelings and the goals of their political parties ahead of the good of our nation.

Is that what so many brave men and women gave their lives for? So that while our nation faces so many dangers, so many dedicated enemies, so many domestic problems that a bunch of self-righteous empty suits insult their sacrifice by tearing apart the nation these brave men and women paid the ultimate price to defend?

Shame on you, Congress. Shame on you, Senate.

A million plus American citizens have given their all to give you the privilege of serving this great nation.

Only two things protect America, and it’s not the kindergarten classes on Capitol Hill. It’s not the idiot talking heads on TV who thought Michael Avenatti would make a good president. It’s not political correctness.

It’s the grace of Almighty God and the United States military are the two things that protect America. And the day we stop honoring either one is the day we’re going down.

To all the families, friends and brothers and sisters in arms who have lost a loved one in the service of this nation, from Hazel, Charlie, Jr. and me and all the folks at The CDB and Twin Pines Ranch, we salute you. We join you in honoring their memories on Memorial Day and the other 364 days of the year.

What do you think?

Pray for our troops our police and the peace of Jerusalem.

God Bless America

Charlie Daniels

— Charlie Daniels

Charlie Daniels is a legendary American singer, song writer, guitarist, and fiddler famous for his contributions to country and southern rock music. Daniels has been active as a singer since the early 1950s. He was inducted into the Grand Ole Opry on January 24, 2008.

https://www.cnsnews.com/commentary/charlie-daniels/charlie-daniels-two-things-protect-america-grace-almighty-god-and-us


Memorial Day (Amazing Grace Bagpipes)


The Call to Courage

Be strong and courageous.  1 Chronicles 28:20

Among a display of male statues (Nelson Mandela, Winston Churchill, Mahatma Gandhi, and others) in London’s Parliament Square, stands a lone statue of a woman. The solitary woman is Millicent Fawcett, who fought for the right of women to vote. She’s immortalized in bronze—holding a banner displaying words she offered in a tribute to a fellow suffragist: “Courage calls to courage everywhere.” Fawcett insisted that one person’s courage emboldens others—calling timid souls into action.

As David prepared to hand his throne over to his son Solomon, he explained the responsibilities that would soon rest heavy on his shoulders. It’s likely Solomon quivered under the weight of what he faced: leading Israel to follow all God’s instructions, guarding the land God had entrusted to them, and overseeing the monumental task of building the temple (1 Chronicles 28:8–10).

Knowing Solomon’s trembling heart, David offered his son powerful words: “Be strong and courageous . . . . Do not be afraid or discouraged, for the Lord God, my God, is with you” (v. 20). Real courage would never arise from Solomon’s own skill or confidence but rather from relying on God’s presence and strength. God provided the courage Solomon needed.

When we face hardship, we often try to drum up boldness or talk ourselves into bravery. God, however, is the one who renews our faith. He will be with us. And His presence calls us to courage.

By Winn Collier

Reflect & Pray

What causes your heart to tremble in fear? How can you seek God’s presence and power in moving toward courage?

God, I’m often so afraid. And when I am, I’m tempted to rely on my own wits or courage—and that’s never enough. Be with me. Give me Your courage.

The Cross Is Grace Displayed

Romans 3:21-27

At Calvary, the Lord displayed His grace for the entire world to see. The cross represents the intersection of His holiness and His love. From there, He poured out mercy on an undeserving population: all of humanity, including you and me.

Our holy God is absolutely without fault. He’s so perfect that no earthly man or woman can look upon Him and live (Ex. 33:20). The problem has to do with our sinful nature—we all have an inborn desire to rebel against His authority (Rom. 3:10). Anyone who thinks otherwise is deceiving himself (1 John 1:8). It’s important to understand that God hates sin. He cannot let evil abide in His presence, so He pronounced a death sentence on sinners (Rom. 6:23).

But Scripture also tells us that God is love (1 John 4:8), and He created people with the intention of caring for them. In fact, the Lord desires that all people spend eternity with Him. Yet there remains the problem of our sin and the penalty that we owe.

The Lord cannot violate His own nature. Though God loves mankind, His holiness would be compromised if He permitted the filth of sin into His presence. So the Father made a way to cleanse dirty hearts and transform wayward natures: He put the sin of all mankind on Jesus Christ’s shoulders.

The Father sent His holy Son to be a perfect sacrifice on our behalf. In other words, Jesus Christ took our sin upon Himself and died on the cross in our place. By trusting Him as our Savior, we receive His forgiveness and are made new (2 Corinthians 5:17). From then on, our Father sees us as holy, perfect, and welcome in His presence.

What God Requires From Us

“And now, Israel, what doth the LORD thy God require of thee, but to fear the LORD thy God, to walk in all his ways, and to love him, and to serve the LORD thy God with all thy heart and with all thy soul, To keep the commandments of the LORD, and his statutes, which I command thee this day for thy good?” (Deuteronomy 10:12-13)

This sounds simple enough, and the people of Israel readily agreed with Moses to do these things. Modern religious liberals cite such a lifestyle as all that is necessary to satisfy God. But the rub is this: Who dares claim to “walk in all his ways, and to love him, and to serve the LORD [his] God with all [his] heart”? Anyone who makes such a claim would be breaking God’s commandment against lying.

Solomon reached a conclusion of like kind: “Let us hear the conclusion of the whole matter: Fear God, and keep his commandments: for this is the whole duty of man” (Ecclesiastes 12:13). Indeed so, but who can “keep his commandments”? “For whosoever shall keep the whole law, and yet offend in one point, he is guilty of all” (James 2:10).

Another favorite verse of the liberals is Micah 6:8: “He hath shewed thee, O man, what is good; and what doth the LORD require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy God?” Yes, but the problem is that “there is not a just man upon earth, that doeth good, and sinneth not” (Ecclesiastes 7:20).

There was one such man, of course! The Lord Jesus Christ “did no sin,” yet was willing to “bare our sins in his own body on the tree, that we, being dead to sins, should live unto righteousness” (1 Peter 2:22-24). What we could never do, He has done for us. Now, through faith in the finished work of Christ, we have been set free from the bondage of sin and can indeed “have [our] fruit unto holiness, and the end everlasting life” (Romans 6:22). HMM

Our Imperfect Interpreters

Being born again… by the word of God, which liveth and abideth for ever…. This is the word [of the Lord] which by the gospel is preached unto you.

—1 Peter 1:23, 25

Often our missionaries have told us of difficult times they have had with interpreters. The expression of the missionary may go in one way and come out with a different sense to the hearer, and I think when we expound the Scriptures, we are often guilty of being imperfect interpreters. I shall do the best I can to catch the spirit of the man, Peter, and to determine what God is trying to say to us and reduce the interference to a minimum.

Now, I suppose more people would like me if I were to declare that I preach the Bible and nothing but the Bible. I attempt to do that, but honesty compels me to say that the best I can do is to preach the Bible as I understand it. I trust that through your prayers and the Spirit of Christ my understanding may be right. If you pray and if I yield and trust, perhaps what we get from First Peter will indeed be approximately what Peter would say if he were here in person. We will stay as close as we can to the Word of the Living God.   ICH017-018

Guide me constantly by Your Spirit so that I may be a faithful mouthpiece. Amen.

 

Blessed is every one that feareth the Lord and walk in His ways

Blessed is every one that feareth the Lord; that walketh in His ways… Happy shalt thou be, and it shall be well with thee.—Psalm 128:1, 2.

 

We think it a gallant thing, to be fluttering up to heaven with our wings of knowledge and speculation, whereas the highest mystery of a divine life here, and of perfect happiness hereafter, consists in nothing but mere obedience to the Divine will. Happiness is nothing but that inward sweet delight, which will arise from the harmonious agreement between our wills and the will of God. There is nothing in the whole world able to do us good or hurt, but God, and our own will: neither riches nor poverty, nor disgrace nor honor, nor life nor death, nor angels nor devils; but willing, or not willing, as we ought.

Ralph Cudworth.

 

The one misery of man is self-will, the one secret of blessedness is the conquest over our own wills. To yield them up to God is rest and peace. What disturbs us in this world is not “trouble,” but our opposition to trouble. The true source of all that frets and irritates, and wears away our lives, is not in external things, but in the resistance of our wills to the will of God expressed by external things.

Alexander MacLaren.

 

Most Common Things Blessed

“Ye shall serve the Lord your God, and he shall bless thy bread, and thy water.” Exod. 23:25

What a promise is this! To serve God is in itself a high delight. But what an added privilege to have the blessing of the Lord resting upon us in all things! Our commonest things become blessed when we ourselves are consecrated to the Lord. Our Lord Jesus took bread and blessed it; behold, we also eat of blessed bread. Jesus blessed water and made it wine: the water which we drink is far better to us than any of the wine with which men make merry; every drop has a benediction in it. The divine blessing is on the man of God in everything, and it shall abide with him at every time.

What if we have only bread and water! Yet it is blessed bread and water. Bread and water we shall have. That is implied, for it must be there for God to bless it. “Thy bread shall be given thee, and thy waters shall be sure.” With God at our table, we not only ask a blessing, but we have one. It is not only at the altar but at the table that He blesses us. He serves those well who serve Him well. This table-blessing is not of debt, but of grace. Indeed, there is a troubled grace; He grants us grace to serve Him, by His grace feeds us with bread, and then in His grace blesses it.