VIDEO Someday We’ll Understand – Suffering Prepares Us to Enjoy God

Someday We’ll Understand

We do not look at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen. 2 Corinthians 4:18

We need filters to strain certain questions from invading our thoughts. For example, the question Why? is natural and normal, but sometimes only God knows the answer. When we obsess with the Whys, we might forget the Who. And what about the phrases, If only… and What if…? Those, too, are normal; but again, only God can answer them. He does not want your thoughts to torment you. He stands ready to forgive your sins and to bring good from your mistakes. The sufferings of this present world are not worth comparing to the glories to be revealed.

The Bible says, “You will keep him in perfect peace, whose mind is stayed on You, because he trusts in You. Trust in the Lord forever, for in Yah, the Lord, is everlasting strength” (Isaiah 26:3-4).

Too often our thoughts are seized by the unanswerable questions of life, but how vital to turn our minds to the unsearchable God who knows the answers, will reveal them in due time, and can work all things for the good of His children.

Trust Him today.

God knows the way, He holds the key, He guides us with unerring hand. Maxwell Cornelius, hymnist


2 Corinthians 4:16–18 // Suffering Prepares Us to Enjoy God

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Back in the Battle

If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just and will forgive us our sins and purify us from all unrighteousness.

1 John 1:9

As a child, she had hurled vicious words at her parents. Little did she know that those words would be her last interaction with them. Now, even after years of counseling, she can’t forgive herself. Guilt and regret paralyze her.

We all live with regrets—some of them quite terrible. But the Bible shows us a way through the guilt. Let’s look at one example.

There’s no sugarcoating what King David did. It was the time “when kings go off to war,” but “David remained in Jerusalem” (2 Samuel 11:1). Away from the battle, he stole another man’s wife and tried to cover it up with murder (vv. 2–5, 14–15). God stopped David’s downward plunge (12:1–13), but the king would live the rest of his life with the knowledge of his sins.

While David was rising from the ashes, his general, Joab, was winning the battle David should have been leading (12:26). Joab challenged David, “Now muster the rest of the troops and besiege the city and capture it” (v. 28). David finally got back to his God-appointed place as the leader of his nation and his army (v. 29).

When we permit our past to crush us, in effect we’re telling God His grace isn’t enough. Regardless of what we’ve done, our Father extends His complete forgiveness to us. We can find, as David did, grace enough to get back in the battle.

By:  Tim Gustafson

Reflect & Pray

What regrets gnaw at your soul? Who in your life might be a safe person to talk to for the reassurance of God’s grace?

Father, may we truly realize Your love defines us.

Can God Use You Now?

Exodus 3:1-12

Do you want to be used by the Lord? I hope so because that’s His will for every believer. As we saw last week, Ephesians 2:10 says God created us in Christ to do good works that He planned for us beforehand. If we are going to become useful to Him, there are three questions we must consider.

Who is God? In Exodus 3, the Lord used a burning bush to get Moses’ attention (v. 2), and then He introduced Himself as the God of Moses’ forefathers (v. 6). The future liberator of the Hebrew slaves needed to know the identity of the One calling him into service. In the same way, we, too, must be sure that we’re serving the only true God. Otherwise, all our efforts and sacrifices will be in vain.

Who am I? Once Moses knew who God was, he was overwhelmed with his own inadequacy and asked, “Who am I?” (v. 11). The Lord uses humble people who reverence Him. Although Moses knew he was insufficient for the task, the Lord assured him by saying, “Certainly I will be with you” (v. 12).

Why am I here? God told Moses his obedience to the assignment would culminate in worship (v. 12). Romans 12:1 says we worship God when we offer ourselves as living sacrifices. In other words, we surrender totally to Him so that He can use us for His glory. We exist to glorify Him by the way we live, speak, and love.

Serving the Lord isn’t something that we design and plan. It has nothing to do with our will but instead requires that we know and submit to the Father, humbly relying on Hisstrength to do His will for His glory.

Designed Creation

“Understand, ye brutish among the people: and ye fools, when will ye be wise? He that planted the ear, shall he not hear? he that formed the eye, shall he not see?” (Psalm 94:8-9)

The concept of evolution, according to this verse, is nothing but brute-like foolishness. If an automobile presupposes an automaker, and a clock implies a clockmaker, surely the infinitely more intricate and complex eyes and ears of living creatures require an eye-maker and an ear-maker! “The hearing ear, and the seeing eye, the LORD hath made even both of them” (Proverbs 20:12).

The most basic of all scientific laws—the law of cause and effect (no effect greater than its cause)—becomes utmost nonsense if the cosmos is the product of chaos and the universe evolved by chance. “The fool hath said in his heart, There is no God” (Psalm 14:1).

Every creature, from the single-cell amoebae to the amazing human body, bears the impress of intricate planning and construction. The notion that such complex structures could evolve by random mutations and natural selection is simply a measure of the audacity of human rebellion and the absurdity of humanistic reasoning. Such things never happen in the real world, and there is no real scientific evidence whatever for “vertical” evolution from one kind to a higher kind. The only genuine evidence for evolution is the fact that the leaders of intellectualism believe it, and the only reason they believe it is their frantic desire to escape God. “Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools” (Romans 1:22).

The ear did not “evolve”; it was planted. The eye did not “happen by chance”; it was formed. Every wise man and woman will say with the psalmist, “I will praise thee; for I am fearfully and wonderfully made: marvellous are thy works; and that my soul knoweth right well” (Psalm 139:14). HMM

Be Not Willing to Take Contempt

And they departed from the presence of the council, rejoicing that they were counted worthy to suffer shame for his name.

—Acts 5:41

We are twentieth-century Christians. Some of us are Christians only because it is convenient and pleasant and because it is not costing us anything. But here is the truth, whether we like it or not: the average evangelical Christian who claims to be born again and have eternal life is not doing as much to propagate his or her faith as the busy adherents of the cults handing out their papers on the street corners and visiting from house to house.

We are not willing to take the spit and the contempt and the abuses those cultists take as they knock on doors and try to persuade everyone to follow them in their mistaken beliefs. The cultists can teach us much about zeal and effort and sacrifice, but most of us do not want to get that serious about our faith—or our Savior.   JIV114-115

Lord, let me have the spirit of the early saints. I pour myself out today as Your servant, no matter the cost. Amen.

 

With Him is the fountain of life

With Thee is the fountain of life; in Thy light shall we see light.—Psalm 36:9.

 

How beautiful our lives may be; how bright In privilege, how fruitful of delight! And lo! all round us His bright servants stand, Events, His duteous ministers and wise, With frowning brows, perhaps, for their disguise, But with such wells of love in their deep eyes, And such strong rescue hidden in their hands!

Henry Septimus Sutton.

 

We see always what we are looking for, and if our mind has become trained to look for trouble and difficulty and all dark and dreary things, we find just what we seek. On the other hand, it is quite as easy to form the habit of looking always for beauty, for good, for happiness, for gladness, and here, too, we shall find precisely what we seek.

J. R. Miller.

 

I never knew her [Mrs. Ewing] fail to find happiness wherever she was placed, and good in whomever she came across. Whatever her circumstances might be, they always yielded to her causes for thankfulness, and work to be done with a ready and hopeful heart.

Horatia K.F. Eden.

 

There Are Rules For Prosperity

“Only be thou strong and very courageous, that thou mayest observe to do according to all the law, which Moses my servant commanded thee: turn not from it to the right hand or to the left, that thou mayest prosper whithersoever thou goest.” Josh. 1:7

Yes, the Lord will be with us in our holy war, but He demands of us that we strictly follow His rules. Our victories will very much depend upon our obeying Him with all our heart, throwing strength and courage into the actions of our faith. If we are halfhearted we cannot expect more than half a blessing.

We must obey the Lord with care and thoughtfulness. “Observe to do” is the phrase used, and it is full of meaning. This is referred to every part of the divine will; we must obey with universal readiness. Our rule of conduct is “according to all the law.” We may not pick and choose, but we must take the Lord’s commands as they come, one and all. In all this we must go on with exactness and constancy. Ours is to be a straightforward course, which bends neither to the right nor to the left. We are not to err by being more rigid than the law, nor turn out of levity to a more free and easy way. With such obedience there will come spiritual prosperity. O Lord, help us to see if it be not even so! We shall not test thy promise in vain.