VIDEO Mary or Martha, One Thing Is Needful

But Martha was distracted.But Martha was distracted.But Martha was distracted. Luke 10:40

A British publication reported about a new study that found the average office worker in the UK takes more than 100 minibreaks during the week, drinks 19 cups of coffee, and attends 17 meetings. A whopping 56 percent say their smartphones are the biggest obstacle to productivity. Many of us can identify with those numbers. Like Martha, we’re distracted.

But here’s another verse for you—1 Corinthians 7:35: “…serve the Lord without distraction.”

This world is filled with distractions, and many of them have to do with our technology. But distractions should never keep us from determining in our minds to wholeheartedly pursue a closer walk with God each day. Like Martha, we have work to do, chores to perform, and responsibilities to bear. But like her sister Mary, we also need time to sit at the feet of Jesus, fellowshipping with Him in Bible study and prayer.

The question isn’t whether we’re going to be Martha or Mary. That’s a false choice. Mary needed time with Jesus, and she undoubtedly learned how to do it. On the other hand, Martha undoubtedly served others with diligence. The key is finding the right balance between listening and laboring, always giving priority to our walk with God.


One Thing Is Needful, Luke 10:38-42 – Pastor Chuck Smith – Topical Bible Study

Overcoming Fear

Some trust in chariots and some in horses, but we trust in the name of the Lord our God.  Psalm 20:7

Fear ruled a man’s life for thirty-two years. Afraid of being caught for his crimes, he hid at his sister’s farmhouse, going nowhere and visiting no one, even missing his mother’s funeral. When he was sixty-four, he learned that no charges had ever been filed against him. The man was free to resume a normal life. Yes, the threat of punishment was real, but he allowed the fear of it to control him.

Likewise, fear ruled the Israelites when the Philistines challenged them at the Valley of Elah. The threat was real. Their enemy Goliath was 9 feet 9 inches tall and his body armor alone weighed 125 pounds (1 Samuel 17:4–5). For forty days, every morning and evening, Goliath challenged the Israelite army to fight him. But no one dared come forward. No one until David visited the battle lines. He heard and saw the taunting, and volunteered to fight Goliath.

While everyone in the Israelite army thought Goliath was too big to fight, David the shepherd boy knew he wasn’t too big for God. He said, “the Lord saves; for the battle is the Lord’s” (v. 47).

When we’re gripped by fear, let’s follow David’s example and fix our eyes on God to gain a right perspective of the problem. The threat may be real, but the One who is with us and for us is bigger than that which is against us.

By: Albert Lee

Reflect & Pray

What giant battle are you facing that’s crippling you in fear? How can you intentionally fix your eyes on the living God?

Thank You, God, that You’re bigger than any other giant in my life. I trust You.

Enjoy Watching God Work

Ephesians 3:14-21

We have the privilege of serving a God who does abundantly more than we can imagine. Most Christians go through their daily life with no real awareness that the Lord is at work. However, He is active all the time, orchestrating circumstances, listening to the prayers of His children, and working through His followers to serve others. God is at work in the life of each believer so that He will receive glory and honor.

It is important that Christians learn to see God at work. To do that, we first need to observe how He worked in the lives of men and women in Scripture. It is also essential for us to listen for what He is saying to our heart. If we think that the Lord has never spoken to us, then either we have not been listening, or we do not really expect an answer from Him at all.

To listen and learn, we must have a right relationship with the Lord—this means confessing our sins and choosing to serve Him. We cannot see God at work if we are not prayerful people. Prayer centers our attention on Him. That focus opens us to the fact that we are loved enough to receive direction from our Father.

Frequently though, the problem is that we do not receive guidance according to our schedule. Our heavenly Father may work over long periods of time, so we must learn to practice patience. A human parent needs at least 18 years to teach a child how to function appropriately in the world. How much longer must it take God to achieve His goal of conforming us to the image of His Son?

Zechariah’s Visions: Under Myrtle Trees

“I saw by night, and behold a man riding upon a red horse, and he stood among the myrtle trees that were in the bottom; and behind him were there red horses, speckled, and white.” (Zechariah 1:8)

The Lord divulges 10 visions to Zechariah in one night. All of them are among myrtle trees in the “bottom” of a dark, mysterious, and somewhat eerie ravine near Jerusalem. The first vision reveals a man on a red horse responding to questions from the “angel of the LORD” and “the LORD of hosts” (Zechariah 1:8-17).

It is likely that the angel of the Lord is a pre-incarnate form of Christ speaking to the First Person of the Godhead. Two other horsemen are cited, which ties these heavenly envoys to the four horsemen of Revelation and to the horsemen driving the four chariots revealed in Zechariah 6.

When Zechariah asks, “What are these?” (8:9), he is told that they are responsible to “walk to and fro” on Earth and inform the Godhead of their findings. On this specific occasion, they report that “the earth is at rest.” Immediately, the “angel of the LORD” asks the Lord of hosts how long He would wait to bring judgment on the nations that have abused Judah now that the 70 years have passed and the punishment of Israel and Judah has been accomplished.

The Lord gives “good and comfortable words,” noting that He was displeased with the nations who had carried out His judgment because they had done more damage than necessary. However, the Lord promises that He will return and build His house, restore Jerusalem to prominence, and “comfort Zion” (Zechariah 1:17).

The following visons outline the inexorable promises of God that will be fulfilled in the years to come. “For all the promises of God in him are yea, and in him Amen, unto the glory of God by us” (2 Corinthians 1:20). HMM III

Forced onto Our Knees

And lest I should be exalted above measure through the abundance of the revelations, there was given to me a thorn in the flesh, the messenger of Satan to buffet me, lest I should be exalted above measure.

—2 Corinthians 12:7

The experiences of men who walked with God in olden times agree to teach that the Lord cannot fully bless a man until He has first conquered him. The degree of blessing enjoyed by any man will correspond exactly with the completeness of God’s victory over him….

We might well pray for God to invade and conquer us, for until He does, we remain in peril from a thousand foes. We bear within us the seeds of our own disintegration…. Deliverance can come to us only by the defeat of our old life. Safety and peace come only after we have been forced to our knees. God rescues us by breaking us, by shattering our strength and wiping out our resistance. Then He invades our natures with that ancient and eternal life which is from the beginning. So He conquers us and by that benign conquest saves us for Himself.   POM045-046, 050

Lord, indeed invade and conquer my heart today. Bring me to my knees in complete surrender; break me; shatter my strength and wipe out my resistance. Invade my nature today and conquer me for Your glory. Amen.

 

My soul shall be joyful in the Lord

My soul shall be joyful in the Lord; it shall rejoice in His salvation.—Psalm 35:9.

The living God, who giveth us richly all things to enjoy.—1 Timothy 6:17.

Behold, My servants shall sing for joy of heart.—Isaiah 65:14.

 

Give me, O Lord, a heart of grace,

A voice of joy, a shining face,

That I may show where’er I turn

Thy love within my soul doth burn!

 

A tenderness for all that stray,

With strength to help them on the way,

A cheerfulness, a heavenly mirth,

Brightening my steps along the earth!

Lady Gilbert.

 

Those who love God are encompassed with gladness on every side, because in every passing moment they see and feel a Father’s love, and nothing of this world can take it away or lessen it.

H.L. Sidney Lear.

 

To be happy is properly the beginning of all schemes for making happy.

Sarah W. Stephen.

 

My life is so strangely free from all trial and trouble, that I cannot doubt my own happiness is one of the talents entrusted to me to “occupy” with, till the Master shall return, by doing something to make other lives happy.

Charles L. Dodgson.

 

Have A Quiet Heart

“In quietness and in confidence shall be your strength.” Isa. 30:15

It is always weakness to be fretting and worrying, questioning and mistrusting. What can we do if we wear ourselves to skin and bone? Can we gain anything by fearing and fuming? Do we not unfit ourselves for action, and unhinge our minds for wise decision? We are sinking by our struggles when we might float by faith.

Oh, for grace to be quiet! Why run from house to house to repeat the weary story which makes us more and more heart-sick as we tell it? Why even stay at home to cry out in agony because of wretched forebodings which may never be fulfilled? It would be well to keep a quiet tongue, but it would be far better if we had a quiet heart. Oh, to be still and know that Jehovah is God!

Oh, for grace to be confident in God! The Holy One of Israel must defend and deliver His own. He cannot run back from His solemn declarations. We may make sure that every word of His will stand though the mountains should depart. He deserves to be confided in; and if we would display confidence and consequent quietness, we might be as happy as the spirits before the throne.

Come, my soul, return unto thy rest, and lean thy head upon the bosom of the Lord Jesus.