VIDEO The Truth I’m Standing On

A natural example of this point can be found by looking at the two seas in the Holy Land. The Sea of Galilee freely receives and gives out water. It has an abundance of life, nurturing many different kinds of fish and plant life. The water from the Sea of Galilee is carried by way of the Jordan river to the Dead Sea. But the Dead Sea only takes water in and does not give out. There is nothing living, no fish or plant life in the Dead Sea. The powerful life giving waters of the Sea of Galilee become dead when mixed with the hoarded waters of the Dead Sea. Life can not be sustained if held onto. –John Bevere, “The Bait Of Satan” Charisma House, 1997, page 12,13.


One of the most telling examples is our view of truth. In the 1960s, 65 percent of Americans said they believed the Bible is true; today that figure has dropped to 32 percent. Even more dramatically, today 67 percent of all Americans deny that there’s any such thing as truth. Seventy percent say there are no moral absolutes.

(Ravi Zacharias, Can Man Live Without God, (Word Publ., Dallas: 1994), p. ix. 10,000 Sermon Illustrations)


Matthew West – The Truth I’m Standing On LIVE Concert

The Battle’s Over. Really.

We were . . . buried with him.  Romans 6:4

For twenty-nine years after World War II ended, Hiroo Onoda hid in the jungle, refusing to believe his country had surrendered. Japanese military leaders had dispatched Onoda to a remote island in the Philippines (Lubang) with orders to spy on the Allied forces. Long after a peace treaty had been signed and hostilities ceased, Onoda remained in the wilderness. In 1974, Onoda’s commanding officer traveled to the island to find him and convince him the war was over.

For three decades, Onoda lived a meager, isolated existence, because he refused to surrender—refused to believe the conflict was done. We can make a similar mistake. Paul proclaims the stunning truth that “all of us who were baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into his death” (Romans 6:3). On the cross, in a powerful, mysterious way, Jesus put to death Satan’s lies, death’s terror, and sin’s tenacious grip. Though we’re “dead to sin” and “alive to God” (v. 11), we often live as though evil still holds the power. We yield to temptation, succumbing to sin’s seduction. We listen to lies, failing to trust Jesus. But we don’t have to yield. We don’t have to live in a false narrative. By God’s grace we can embrace the true story of Christ’s victory.

While we’ll still wrestle with sin, liberation comes as we recognize that Jesus has already won the battle. May we live out that truth in His power.

By:  Winn Collier

Reflect & Pray

How are you tempted to believe that death and sin still hold power over your life? Where can you see Christ’s victory already present in the world?

Jesus, I know You’ve won the battle over evil and darkness. Would You help me to live this out?

The Wonder Of Sight

view from hill
I will praise You, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made; marvelous are Your works, and that my soul knows very well. —Psalm 139:14

On the livescience.com website, I read something pretty amazing: “If you were standing atop a mountain surveying a larger-than-usual patch of the planet, you could perceive bright lights hundreds of miles distant. On a dark night, you could even see a candle flame flickering up to 30 miles (48 km) away.” No telescopes or night-vision goggles needed—the human eye is so profoundly designed that even long distances can be spanned with clear sight.

This fact is a vivid reminder of our amazing Creator, who designed not only the human eye but also all of the details that make up our expansive universe. And, unlike anything else in creation, God has made us in His own image (Gen. 1:26). “In His image” speaks of something far greater than the ability to see. It speaks of a likeness to God that makes it possible for us to be in relationship with Him.

We can affirm David’s declaration, “I will praise You, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made; marvelous are Your works, and that my soul knows very well” (Ps. 139:14). Not only have we been given eyes to see, but we have also been made so that, in Christ, one day we will see Him! By Bill Crowder

In today’s reading, David’s declaration of amazement at how wonderfully he is made comes in the context of listing some of the other aspects of God’s creation: the heavens, the sea, the night, and the day. Verses 7-12 describe both God’s omnipotence and His omnipresence. David celebrates not only the magnitude and power of God, but he also underscores that no matter where he is, God’s hand will lead him and hold him (v.10).

Lord, how Thy wonders are displayed
Wherever I turn my eye,
If I survey the ground I tread
Or gaze upon the sky! —Watts

All of God’s creation bears witness to Him as our great Creator.

Were the Creation Days 24 Hours Long?

Days of Creation

 

God called the light Day, and the darkness He called Night. So the evening and the morning were the first day. (Genesis 1:5)

The creation days in Genesis 1 offer a test of belief. Could a lifeless, shapeless mass really turn into a fully formed and inhabited Earth in just six days? This record of perhaps the ultimate miracle confronts us with the power and personality of the miracle Maker.

A six-day creation certainly challenges the beliefs of someone unsure of who God is, but the challenge is even more acute for those who hold the secular understanding that the earth and universe evolved over billions of years. What are we to do with the days of Genesis? Four reasonable arguments reveal our answer.

The first argument concerns miracles themselves. Most of our cultural leaders reject the possibility of a supernatural creation. Of course, sheer refusal to believe in miracles is no substitute for examining evidence for or against a possible miracle. But since natural processes do not create stars, planets, or people, creation must have occurred through a supernatural process—a miracle.

A god who can make a universe can do anything at any pace, even creating and organizing all things in just six days. He should also be able to clearly communicate, as we read in Genesis. There, the Lord defined the first day as the span between evening and morning—our second argument. This “daylight” definition of day should sound familiar. For example, one might say, “I saw her during the day.” All one needs to define these ordinary days is an earth rotating near a fixed light source. God provided light for the first three days of the creation week and then created the sun to continue producing light from Day 4 until today.

A third reasonable argument about the length of creation-week days notes that saying “the second day” and “the third day” normally signifies 24-hour days. If God intended to convey millions or billions of years, then why didn’t He just say so? Instead, He defined a normal day in the unmistakable terms of one Earth rotation.

The last reasonable argument comes from the Fourth Commandment. It says that one day out of every seven days should be set aside to remember and honor the Lord instead of working. It relies entirely on and points directly to God’s six working days and one rest day during the creation week itself. Why were the Israelites told to take this day off? God explains it in no uncertain terms: “For in six days the LORD made the heavens and the earth, the sea, and all that is in them, and rested the seventh day. Therefore the LORD blessed the Sabbath day and hallowed it.”1 Since our workweek days are solar days, then God’s creation week must also have been composed of normal days.

Evolutionary ideas generally exclude miracles and God, so it makes little sense to rely on them when trying to understand creation-week days. But God can do anything. He could transform a lifeless, shapeless mass into an inhabited Earth in an instant, over billions of years, or in six literal days. By using “evening and morning,” by numbering each day, and by patterning our ordinary workweek after His first workweek, He told us that He did it in six ordinary days.

Reference

Exodus 20:11.

by Brian Thomas, M.S. a Science Writer at the Institute for Creation Research.

Cite this article: Brian Thomas, M.S. 2015. Were the Creation Days 24 Hours Long?. Acts & Facts. 44 (7).

http://www.icr.org/article/8812

Some Early Church Methods

And the multitude of them that believed were of one heart and of one soul: neither said any of them that aught of the things which he possessed was his own; but they had all things common. And with great power gave the apostles witness of the resurrection of the Lord Jesus: and great grace was upon them all.

—Acts 4:32-33

A friend of mine went to see a man who was the head of a local communist cell in a local communist headquarters where they send out literature. The communist said, “Come in, Reverend, and sit down.” He went in and sat. “Now, we’re communists,” he said, “you know that, and you’re a minister. Of course, we’re miles apart. But,” he said, “I want to tell you something. We learned our technique from your book of Acts.” And he said, “You who believe the Bible have thrown overboard the methods of the early church and we who don’t believe it have adopted them and they’re working.”

What was the method? It’s a very simple method of the early church. It was to go witness, give everything to the Lord and give up all to God and bear your cross, take the consequences. The result was in the first hundred years of the Christian church the whole known world was evangelized.   SAT010-011

Lord, we’re too selfish, busy doing our own thing. Give us a spirit of love, of unselfishness, of willingness to pay any price for the sake of the gospel. Do it for Jesus’ sake. Amen.

 

Appraise, then Act

Prove all things; hold fast that which is good.

—1 Thessalonians 5:21

 

Many tender-minded Christians fear to sin against love by daring to inquire into anything that comes wearing the cloak of Christianity and breathing the name of Jesus. They dare not examine the credentials of the latest prophet to hit their town lest they be guilty of rejecting something which may be of God….This is supposed to indicate a high degree of spirituality. But in sober fact it indicates no such thing. It may indeed be evidence of the absence of the Holy Spirit.

Gullibility is not synonymous with spirituality. Faith is not a mental habit leading its possessor to open his mouth and swallow everything that has about it the color of the supernatural. Faith keeps its heart open to whatever is of God, and rejects everything that is not of God, however wonderful it may be.

“Try the spirits” is a command of the Holy Spirit to the Church (1 John 4:1). We may sin as certainly by approving the spurious as by rejecting the genuine….To appraise things with a heart of love and then to act on the results is an obligation resting upon every Christian in the world. SOS025

Can you renounce everything which is inconsistent with the glory of God and the highest good of your fellowmen? DTC149-150

 

When Tragedy Strikes

Job 13:15

The Book of Job lives because the heart of the world beats in it. Within its pages are enshrined some of the deepest questionings and yearnings of the human spirit. Time has not altered these, for the book could be written in thousands of homes today.

When a young wife dies leaving motherless children, or a husband is killed, robbing the home of the breadwinner, or disaster overtakes a business which took years to build, the same cries are wrung from the heart.

Added to life’s tragedies are floods that drown, cold which freezes, earthquakes which smash cities to ruin, volcanoes which pour their boiling lava into homes. So Job seems to be right when he cries: “Yet man is born to trouble, as surely as sparks fly upward” (Job 5:7).

Job was a chieftain of immense wealth. He was wise and the spiritual father of his tribe. His creed was that God prospers and blesses those who trust in Him. But when calamity came to him, everything he believed about God was contradicted and his creed went to the winds.

In the story of Job, God accepted the challenge of the devil, and soon Job’s life was turned into desperate havoc. Calamity after calamity befell Job. The Sabeans and Chaldeans slew his servants and cattle; lightning wrecked his house and slew his children. He became affected with a dreadful disease. Job did not understand what God was doing, yet he clung to the certainty that God would see him through. When Job said, “Though He slay me, yet will I trust in him,”

(Job 13:15 KJV) it was one of the most sublime utterances in the Old Testament.

Here lies the answer to the problem of suffering. Job moved from a belief in a creed to a trust in a Person. There is a difference in belief in God with the head and trust in God with the heart. Job won through, proving to the world that God is loved and trusted for His own sake alone.

Have the events of life made us cynical? Has suffering been too much for our faith? Our faith is that no ultimate harm can come to him who trusts in God. When the end comes the trumpets sounding on the other side will mean the final vindication of God.

George B. Smith, Meditations for the Ordinary Man