VIDEO No More Tears: God Sees Our Tears – The Inevitable Harvest

Those who sow in tears shall reap in joy.  Psalm 126:5

There are many kinds of tears. Some come from chopping onions. Others come from a fit of laughter. A sad movie can turn on the water works. Even smoke from a campfire can make our eyes water. Babies begin their lives with tears. Tears are important for lubricating our eyes and flushing away debris.

But when we think of tears, we usually think of burdens. God sees our tears as seeds. Each tear shed in grief, disappointment, pain, or emotional distress is like a seed that falls from our eyes and lands in the garden of God’s grace. He knows the meaning behind every drop, and none of them are unnoticed by Him.

In the same way that Romans 8:28 tells us that all things will work together for our good, Psalm 126:5 tells us that somehow our tears will produce a harvest of joy. How can that be? We don’t fully understand the scope of God’s grace, the power of His providence, and the depths of His mercy. But every promise in the Bible is true, so you can adopt Psalm 126:5 as your own today.

Look unto Jesus even through your tears. Dr. Joseph Parker


The Inevitable Harvest, Psalm 126 – Pastor Chuck Smith – Topical Bible Study

Running into Love

I have loved you with an everlasting love. Jeremiah 31:3

Nora was tiny, but “Bridget”—the belligerent, six-foot-tall woman glowering down at her—didn’t intimidate her. Bridget couldn’t even say why she had stopped at the crisis pregnancy center; she’d already made up her mind to “get rid of this . . . kid.” So Nora gently asked questions, and Bridget rudely deflected them with profanity-laced tirades. Soon Bridget got up to leave, defiantly declaring her intent to end her pregnancy.

Slipping her small frame between Bridget and the door, Nora asked, “Before you go, may I give you a hug, and may I pray for you?” No one had ever hugged her before—not with healthy intentions, anyway. Suddenly, unexpectedly, the tears came.

Nora beautifully reflects the heart of our God who loved His people Israel “with an everlasting love” (Jeremiah 31:3). The people had stumbled into the hard consequences of their persistent violation of His guidelines. Yet God told them, “I have drawn you with unfailing kindness. I will build you up again” (vv. 3–4).

Bridget’s history is complex. (Many of us can relate.) Until she ran into real love that day, her belief had been that God and His followers would only condemn her. Nora showed her something different: the God who won’t ignore our sin because He loves us beyond imagination. He welcomes us with open arms. We don’t have to keep running.

By:  Tim Gustafson

A Life of Faith

Hebrews 10:35-39

Some people take their faith for granted, thinking it opened them up to Christian beliefs but has no current relevance. However, the writer of Hebrews says that once we are declared righteous through placing our trust in Jesus Christ, we should continue to live by faith and not shrink back.

Living by faith is something learned over time as we see God’s faithfulness in both His Word and our own experiences. Consider the various degrees of faith, as illustrated by the following scriptural examples:

Little faith (Matt. 8:23-27)—Jesus’ disciples focused on a dangerous storm and cried out for help, yet Jesus questioned why they were afraid at all. Little faith struggles to believe that God is bigger than the situation.

Great faith (Matt. 8:5-13)—Though concerned about his servant’s ailment, the centurion recognized Christ’s authority over illness and believed He could do the impossible.

Perfected faith (James 2:20-23)—Abraham was so confident in the Lord that he followed through with a very difficult act of obedience. As a result, his initial faith was made complete and mature.

No matter how long you have been a Christian, God wants you to continually grow in faith. The only way to do that is by knowing and believing His Word.

Scattering Hammer

“Is not my word like as a fire? saith the LORD; and like a hammer that breaketh the rock in pieces?” (Jeremiah 23:29)

One of the most picturesque of the figures used to describe the Holy Scriptures is that of the hammer striking and shattering a rock. In this text, however, the “rock” is literally a mighty rock mountain.

Furthermore, the effect of the hammer is to “break in pieces.” This phrase actually is a single Hebrew word that normally means “disperse” or “scatter abroad,” usually used in describing the worldwide dispersion of the children of Israel. It was used even earlier for the first dispersion at Babel: “So the LORD scattered them abroad from thence upon the face of all the earth” (Genesis 11:8). Perhaps most significantly of all, it is used in the prophecy of Zechariah 13:7: “Smite the shepherd, and the sheep shall be scattered.”

This verse was quoted by the Lord Jesus just after the last supper and applied to Himself: “All ye shall be offended because of me this night: for it is written, I will smite the shepherd, and the sheep of the flock shall be scattered abroad” (Matthew 26:31). Combining all these themes, our text really seems to be saying: “Is not my word like a mighty hammer from heaven that shatters the great mountain and scatters it abroad?”

Our text is inserted in the midst of a stinging rebuke by Jeremiah of Israel’s false prophets, contrasting their lies with the mighty power of God’s true Word. Perhaps it is also a parable of the living Word, who is also the great Rock of ages as well as the loving Shepherd. When the Rock was shattered, the living stones were ejected from the Rock. The sheep that were thus scattered from the Shepherd became the spreading fire of the written Word, and “they that were scattered abroad went every where preaching the word” (Acts 8:4). HMM

The Gospel Implications

For the grace of God that bringeth salvation hath appeared to all men, teaching us that, denying ungodliness and worldly lusts, we should live soberly, righteously, and godly, in this present world.

—Titus 2:11-12

 

The fact is that the New Testament message embraces a great deal more than an offer of free pardon. It is a message of pardon, and for that may God be praised; but it is also a message of repentance. It is a message of atonement, but it is also a message of temperance and righteousness and godliness in this present world. It tells us that we must accept a Savior, but it tells us also that we must deny ungodliness and worldly lusts. The gospel message includes the idea of amendment, of separation from the world, of cross-carrying and loyalty to the kingdom of God even unto death.

To be strictly technical, these latter truths are corollaries of the gospel, and not the gospel itself; but they are part and parcel of the total message which we are commissioned to declare….

To offer a sinner the gift of salvation based upon the work of Christ, while at the same time allowing him to retain the idea that the gift carries with it no moral implications, is to do him untold injury where it hurts him worst.   SOS019-020

Lord, help me to proclaim the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth as I present the gospel today. Amen.

 

The Harvest of a Life

He that soweth to the Spirit shall of the Spirit reap life everlasting.

—Galatians 6:8

 

We have but to submit to [the Holy Spirit] to gain from [Him] an everlasting reward. Deeds done in the Spirit, in obedience to Christ and with the purpose of bringing honor to the Triune God, are seeds of endless blessedness.

The first gift of life is not by works, but by faith in the work of a sufficient Redeemer; but after the miracle of the new birth has been accomplished, the Christian to a large extent carries his future in his hands. If he denies himself and takes up his cross in meek obedience, his deeds will become seeds of life and everlasting glory.

He may forget his deeds of love or think them small and useless, but God is not unmindful. He never forgets.

The sweet harvest of a life well lived will be there to meet the sower after the toil is ended and the heat of the day is past. NCA087

If you would constantly enjoy [God’s] approving smile, let Him see a spirit of single-hearted devotion to Jesus and uncompromising and unqualified obedience to His will. WL041

 

All That I Am

Matthew 13:44-46

 

All that I am, All I can be

All that I have, All that is me,

Accept and use, Lord, As You would choose, Lord,

Right now, today.

Take every passion, every skill,

Take all my dreams and bend them to Your will.

My all I give, Lord, for You I’ll live, Lord,

Come what may.

Often I come with my problems and cares,

Running to You when distressed;

But I must bring you the whole of my life,

Lord, I must give you my best.

All that I am, All I can be

All that I have, All that is me,

Accept and use, Lord, As You would choose, Lord,

Right now, today.

Take every passion, every skill,

Take all my dreams and bend them to Your will.

My all I give, Lord, for You I’ll live, Lord,

Come what may.

Life has no purpose unless it is Yours

Life without You has no goal;

All that fulfills me is doing Your will,

Lord, I must give You my best.

All that I am, All I can be

All that I have, All that is me,

Accept and use, Lord, As You would choose, Lord,

Right now, today.

Take every passion, every skill,

Take all my dreams and bend them to Your will.

My all I give, Lord, for You I’ll live, Lord,

Come what may.

William Himes, Sing to the Lord, Vol. 1, Part 2