VIDEO Learning to Trust – Through it all I learn to trust in Jesus

Therefore I say to you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat or what you will drink; nor about your body, what you will put on. Is not life more than food and the body more than clothing? Matthew 6:25

Every thirty days we pay the mortgage or rent, the utility bills, insurance premiums, and more. Once we clear the bills, the thirty-day cycle starts all over again. For that reason, modern Christians have a hard time with Jesus’ admonition not to worry about life—to take no thought for tomorrow. How will the bills be paid if we “take no thought”?

Jesus didn’t say, “Don’t work”; He said, “Don’t worry.” Part of life in the kingdom of God is the realization that we are stewards and God is the Master. He provides opportunities for us to do His work. That was a central theme when Jesus sent His disciples out, two by two, to preach and heal with kingdom power (Mark 6:7-13). They were instructed to take no worldly resources with them. They were to live like Jesus lived—in complete dependence on the Father (Luke 9:58).

We work to eat and provide for our families (2 Thessalonians 3:10), but we do so with God’s blessing and provision. It is a reminder to “walk by faith, not by sight” (2 Corinthians 5:7).

Worry is an indication that we think God cannot look after us.  Oswald Chambers


Through it all I learn to trust in Jesus. ..I learn to trust in God

God Holds Us

I will uphold you with my righteous right hand. Isaiah 41:10

South African Fredie Blom turned 114 in 2018, widely recognized as the oldest living man. Born in 1904, the year the Wright Brothers built their Flyer II, he’s lived through both World Wars, apartheid, and the Great Depression. When asked for the secret for his longevity, Blom only shrugs. Like many of us, he hasn’t always chosen the foods and practices that promote wellness. However, Blom does offer one reason for his remarkable health: “There’s only one thing, it’s [God]. He’s got all the power . . . . He holds me.”

Blom echoes words similar to what God spoke to Israel, as the nation wilted under the oppression of fierce enemies. “I will strengthen you and help you,” God promised. “I will uphold you with my righteous right hand” (Isaiah 41:10). No matter how desperate their situation, how impossible the odds that they would ever find relief, God assured His people that they were held in His tender care. “Do not fear, for I am with you,” He insisted. “Do not be dismayed, for I am your God” (v. 10).

No matter how many years we’re given, life’s hardships will come knocking at our door. A troubled marriage. A child abandoning the family. Terrifying news from the doctor. Even persecution. However, our God reaches out to us and holds us firmly. He gathers us and holds us in His strong, tender hand.

By:  Winn Collier


Reflect & Pray

When have you felt isolated or exposed? How does it encourage you to know that your life is being held in God’s strong hand?

God, assure me that You’re holding me because I feel like I’m only hanging on by a thread. I trust that You’ll help and uphold me.

The Mexican Fisherman And The MBA

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I have always loved the following modern day parable, in fact I’ve quoted it in job interviews. The author of this modern story is unknown, but it appears on almost every business, life coach, or business consultants blog on the internet at some point in time. Here’s a tidbit that most of them don’t mention.

King Solomon was the richest and wisest King who ever lived. He had unlimited resources and withheld no pleasure from himself (sinful or otherwise). He learned this lesson long ago.

Ecclesiastes 8:15 So I recommend having fun, because there is nothing better for people in this world than to eat, drink, and enjoy life. That way they will experience some happiness along with all the hard work God gives them under the sun.

An executive from America was standing at the pier of a Mexican village, taking a much needed vacation. It was his first in more than 10 years. He noticed a small boat with just one fisherman had docked. Inside the small boat were several large yellow fin tuna. The executive complimented the Mexican fisherman on the quality of his fish and asked how long it took to catch them.

The Mexican replied, “only a little while.”

The executive then asked, “why didn’t you stay out longer and catch more fish?”

The Mexican replied,  “I  have enough to support my family for a little while.”

The executive then asked, “but what do you do with the rest of your time?”

The Mexican fisherman said, “I sleep late, fish a little, play with my children, take siesta with my wife, and stroll into the village each evening where I sip wine and play guitar with my amigos, I have a full and busy life.”

The executive scoffed, “I am a Harvard MBA and could help you. You should spend more time fishing and with the proceeds, buy a bigger boat with the proceeds from the bigger boat you could buy several boats, eventually you would have a fleet of fishing boats. Instead of selling your catch to a middleman you would sell directly to the processor, eventually opening your own cannery. You would control the product, processing and distribution. You would need to leave this small coastal fishing village and move to Mexico City, then LA and eventually NYC where you will run your expanding enterprise.”

The Mexican fisherman asked, “But, how long will this all take?”

To which the American replied, “15-20 years.”

“But what then?”

The American laughed and said that’s the best part. “When the time is right you would announce an IPO and sell your company stock to the public and become very rich, you would make millions.”

“Millions.. Then what?”

The American said, “Then you would retire. Move to a small coastal fishing village where you would sleep late, fish a little, play with your kids, take siesta with your wife, stroll to the village in the evenings where you could sip wine and play your guitar with your amigos.”

Upon returning home the MBA sold his business and bought a small cabin in the woods where he lived out his days fishing and playing the guitar.

Living slowly, and requiring less, is far preferable to always trying to keep up with the Jones’.

I’ve tried both, although never from a standpoint of immense wealth.

Life is hard.

Relax, pray, downsize if you must and be content. Godliness with contentment is great gain.

 

 

by Chris Mills

original here

Don’t Hurt the Lord

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Have I been with you so long, and yet you have not known Me, Philip? —John 14:9

Our Lord must be repeatedly astounded at us— astounded at how “un-simple” we are. It is our own opinions that make us dense and slow to understand, but when we are simple we are never dense; we have discernment all the time. Philip expected the future revelation of a tremendous mystery, but not in Jesus, the Person he thought he already knew. The mystery of God is not in what is going to be— it is now, though we look for it to be revealed in the future in some overwhelming, momentous event. We have no reluctance to obey Jesus, but it is highly probable that we are hurting Him by what we ask— “Lord, show us the Father…” (John 14:8).

His response immediately comes back to us as He says, “Can’t you see Him? He is always right here or He is nowhere to be found.” We look for God to exhibit Himself to His children, but God only exhibits Himself in His children. And while others see the evidence, the child of God does not. We want to be fully aware of what God is doing in us, but we cannot have complete awareness and expect to remain reasonable or balanced in our expectations of Him. If all we are asking God to give us is experiences, and the awareness of those experiences is blocking our way, we hurt the Lord. The very questions we ask hurt Jesus, because they are not the questions of a child.

“Let not your heart be troubled…” (14:1, 27). Am I then hurting Jesus by allowing my heart to be troubled? If I believe in Jesus and His attributes, am I living up to my belief? Am I allowing anything to disturb my heart, or am I allowing any questions to come in which are unsound or unbalanced? I have to get to the point of the absolute and unquestionable relationship that takes everything exactly as it comes from Him. God never guides us at some time in the future, but always here and now. Realize that the Lord is here now, and the freedom you receive is immediate.

By Oswald Chambers

Seek True Greatness

But it shall not be so among you: but whosoever will be great among you, let him be your minister; and whosoever will be chief among you, let him be your servant. —Matthew 20:26-27

The essence of [God’s] teaching is that true greatness lies in character, not in ability or position. Men in their blindness had always thought that superior talents made a man great, and so the vast majority believe today. To be endowed with unusual abilities in the field of art or literature or music or statecraft, for instance, is thought to be in itself an evidence of greatness, and the man thus endowed is hailed as a great man. Christ taught, and by His life demonstrated, that greatness lies deeper….

While a few philosophers and religionists of pre-Christian times had seen the fallacy in man’s idea of greatness and had exposed it, it was Christ who located true greatness and showed how it could be attained. “Whosoever will be great among you, let him be your minister; and whosoever will be chief among you, let him be your servant” (Matthew 20:26-27). It is that simple and that easy—and that difficult.   BAM050

Lord, this truth is indeed contrary to the philosophy of the world. Stimulate my heart this morning to desire this true greatness for Your glory. Amen.

The Holy Spirit Is Not Optional

For thou, Lord, wilt bless the righteous; with favour wilt thou compass him as with a shield. —Psalm 5:12

The stark, tragic fact is that the efforts of many people to worship are unacceptable to God. Without an infusion of the Holy Spirit there can be no true worship. This is serious. It is hard for me to rest peacefully at night knowing that millions of cultured, religious people are merely carrying on church traditions and religious customs and they are not actually reaching God at all.

We must humbly worship God in spirit and in truth. Each one of us stands before the truth to be judged. Is it not now plain that the presence and the power of the Holy Spirit of God, far from being an optional luxury in our Christian lives, is a necessity? WHT046

The fellowship of God is delightful beyond all telling. He communes with His redeemed ones in an easy, uninhibited fellowship that is restful and healing to the soul. He is not sensitive nor selfish nor temperamental. What He is today we shall find Him tomorrow and the next day and the next year….He loves us for ourselves and values our love more than galaxies of new created worlds. ROR015

Secular and Sacred

Romans 12:1

This call to present to God our bodies refers, primarily, to this body by means of which I have my being and earn my living—which is another way of saying that divine service is not limited to a particular hour on a Sunday, but covers all that takes place both in my work week as well as in my hours of leisure.

The purpose of the Christian faith is needlessly curtailed if its application is limited to special times and special areas of life. The redemptive purpose of God is as concerned with the way in which a man uses his time and spends his money as the way in which he says his prayers.

We all know that there is a plain difference between a place of worship and an industrial plant, though the balance of life requires our attendance at both. But to suppose that what goes on in the one—but not the other—is of interest to God, is to deprive man of his only hope of a salvation which can redeem the whole of his life.

The shoe repairer who helps to keep people’s feet dry, the shopkeeper who serves wholesome food over his counter, the garage mechanic whose repair job is utterly dependable—and all others like them—can present their bodies, that is to say, what they do, to God as their acceptable service.

In the second place, we are to present to God not only what the body does but what the body is. We would miss an important part of the meaning of this command if we limited it to our physical and mental activities.

For what is the body intended to be? “The temple of the Holy Spirit” is the Christian answer. The body is more than a structure of flesh and bones. In this sense the body means the whole personality. “Your very selves,” translates the New English Bible. This self or personality, presented to God, can be the temple or home of His Spirit, thus becoming yet another human instrument which God can use to accomplish His will on earth.

This is what holy living means—the dedication of as much as I possess to as much as I know of the will of God for me. And far from this total response cramping any man’s style, it ennobles him who makes it and glorifies the God whose service is always perfect freedom.

Frederick Coutts, Essentials of Christian Experience