Satan’s Pincer Movement

Simon, Simon, look out! Satan has asked to sift you like wheat. But I have prayed for you that your faith may not fail.—Luke 22:31-32

One of the reasons the Apostle Paul bids us pray for one another is this: the failure of any one of us is going to have some effect upon the spiritual campaign which God is waging against the Devil through the church.

All those who have committed themselves to Jesus Christ should know that the forces of two kingdoms—the kingdoms of God and of the Devil—are locked together in mortal combat. And Christians, whether they like it or not, are thrust right onto the cutting edge of this conflict.

The battle line between the forces of God and the forces of Satan is the church—and that means you and me. What is Satan’s best tactic in attempting to bring about the church’s spiritual defeat? He probes at every point he can, looking for the weakest part. When he finds a weak Christian (or a group of weak Christians), he calls for reinforcements. Then, using what military strategists call “a pincer movement,” he attempts to break through at that point. And when one Christian fails, all of us to some extent are affected, for we are all part of the one line of defense.

How the Devil rejoices when an individual Christian falls—especially a church leader. Therefore, we are called to a ministry of prayer—not just for ourselves but for one another also—that we might stand perfect and complete in the will of God and that our faith will not fail when under attack by the Devil.

Prayer

Father, I am encouraged as I think that today, millions of Christians around the world will be praying for me. Help me never to fail in my responsibility to pray for them. In Christ’s peerless and precious name. Amen.

Further Study

Gl 6:1-10; 1Co 9:27; Php 3:12; Jms 5:16

What are we to carry in prayer?

Of what was Paul conscious?

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