Doxology

I love You, Lord, my strength. The Lord is my rock, my fortress, and my deliverer, my God, my mountain where I seek refuge, my shield and the horn of my salvation, my stronghold. I called to the Lord, who is worthy of praise, and I was saved from my enemies (Psalm 18 vv. 1-3).

The psalms contain more lament than praise. Uninhibited praise is usually preceded by authentic lament. Perhaps today our praise and worship are sometimes shallow and superficial because we have not learned to lament. Unlike David we have little or no concept of how profound our personal need is.

Miraculously delivered from his enemies and from Saul (see 2 Sam. 8, 22), David broke forth in this moving song with intense feeling. Because of his artistic discipline, he was able to hone this experience into a carefully crafted psalm of beautiful structure and symmetry:

  • Doxology (vv. 1-3)
  • Metaphors of deliverance (vv. 4-6)
  • Theophany (vv. 7-15)
  • Personal application (vv. 16-45)
  • Doxology (vv.46-50)

This song deals with David’s dramatic deliverance from Saul and from his enemies, but it also deals with the quintessential Deliverer to come, the Messiah. In Romans 15:9, Paul applies Psalm 18:49 directly to Christ, our Messiah.

Psalm 18 comforts and encourages me. Like David, I can be set free—physically and emotionally. The liberation of my personality will occur as I place more and more trust in Christ, my Deliverer, rather than in human effort unempowered by God.

Personal Prayer

I praise you, Yahweh, for being my Rock, my Savior, and my Deliverer. May you be exalted in my life today, and may I sing praises to your name.

The Language of Music

Doxology

An expression of praise to God, this term is based on the Greek word Doxa which means “glory.”

Louis Bourgeois’s “Doxology” from the Genevan Psalter is an excellent example:

Praise God, from whom all blessings flow;

Praise Him, all creatures here below;

Praise Him above, ye heavenly host;

Praise Father, Son, and Holy Ghost. Amen!

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