VIDEO The Theology of Resting in God – Resting in Christ

The Theology of Resting in God

Why are you fearful, O you of little faith? —Matthew 8:26

When we are afraid, the least we can do is pray to God. But our Lord has a right to expect that those who name His name have an underlying confidence in Him. God expects His children to be so confident in Him that in any crisis they are the ones who are reliable. Yet our trust is only in God up to a certain point, then we turn back to the elementary panic-stricken prayers of those people who do not even know God. We come to our wits’ end, showing that we don’t have even the slightest amount of confidence in Him or in His sovereign control of the world. To us He seems to be asleep, and we can see nothing but giant, breaking waves on the sea ahead of us.

“…O you of little faith!” What a stinging pain must have shot through the disciples as they surely thought to themselves, “We missed the mark again!” And what a sharp pain will go through us when we suddenly realize that we could have produced complete and utter joy in the heart of Jesus by remaining absolutely confident in Him, in spite of what we were facing.

There are times when there is no storm or crisis in our lives, and we do all that is humanly possible. But it is when a crisis arises that we instantly reveal upon whom we rely. If we have been learning to worship God and to place our trust in Him, the crisis will reveal that we can go to the point of breaking, yet without breaking our confidence in Him.

We have been talking quite a lot about sanctification, but what will be the result in our lives? It will be expressed in our lives as a peaceful resting in God, which means a total oneness with Him. And this oneness will make us not only blameless in His sight, but also a profound joy to Him.

WISDOM FROM OSWALD CHAMBERS

If a man cannot prove his religion in the valley, it is not worth anything.  Shade of His Hand, 1200 L


Resting in Christ – Charles R. Swindoll

Advertisements

Help from Heaven

Surely the Lord was fighting for Israel! Joshua 10:14

SOS, the Morse code signal, was created in 1905 because sailors needed a way to indicate extreme distress. The signal gained notoriety in 1910 when used by the sinking ship Steamship Kentucky, saving all forty-six people aboard.

While SOS may be a more recent invention, the urgent cry for help is as old as humanity. We hear it often in the Old Testament story of Joshua, who faced opposition from fellow Israelites (Joshua 9:18) and challenging terrain (3:15–17) for more than fourteen years as the Israelites slowly conquered and settled the land God had promised them. During this struggle “the Lord was with Joshua” (6:27).

In Joshua 10, the Israelites go to the aid of the Gibeonites, allies of Israel who were being attacked by five kings. Joshua knew that he needed the Lord’s help to defeat so many powerful enemies (v. 12). God responded with a hailstorm, even stopping the sun in the middle of the sky to give Israel more time to defeat the enemy. Joshua 10:14 recounts, “Surely the Lord was fighting for Israel!”

If you are in the midst of a challenging situation, you can send out an SOS to God. Although help will look different than the assistance Joshua received, perhaps help comes through an unexpected job, an understanding doctor, or peace in the midst of grief. Be encouraged that these are ways He is responding to your call for help and fighting for you.

Thank You, Father, for walking with me on this difficult journey and hearing me when I cry out to You.

As we cry out to God for help, we can trust that He will be with us.

By Lisa Samra 

INSIGHT

The Gibeonites feared Israel’s God, so they tricked Joshua and the Israelites into becoming their allies (Joshua 9). So when Gibeon called Israel for help (10:6), they were ultimately calling on God.

Do we wait for a crisis to turn to Him?

Tim Gustafson

A Lifestyle of Obedience

Genesis 6:9-22

A lifestyle of obedience requires commitment and perseverance. Noah needed both as he obeyed the Lord’s instructions to build a large boat with a roof, doors, and three decks. God spelled out the exact measurements, the type of wood to use, and the way to make the vessel watertight. It was essential that Noah adhere to every detail if the ark was to house all the animals and stay afloat.

Scripture does not describe reactions to the project, but knowing human nature, we can imagine the disbelief and rejection Noah probably experienced. Yet he worked faithfully to the end and “did everything just as God commanded Him” (Gen. 6:22 NIV).

The Lord wants us to follow His instructions precisely. Unfortunately, we like to add some of our desires and preferences to His plan. We are like a child whose parent assigns three chores. The first is done satisfactorily, the second is put off until another day, and the third is skipped because the child deems it unnecessary. This is not obedience. In our case, we know we’re called to show compassion and kindness, forgiving others as the Lord forgave us (Col. 3:13). However, our human nature wants to pick and choose which parts of Scripture we’ll obey. As believers, we should keep in mind that God honors those who wholeheartedly follow Him (John 12:26).

Many people in the Bible saw obedience as their goal. Abraham determined to go wherever God led. Moses felt inadequate but still carried out the Lord’s plan. Paul did an about-face to become Christ’s disciple. Ask the Holy Spirit to empower you to follow the path of righteousness.

It Takes Faith

“But as many as received him, to them gave he power to become the sons of God, even to them that believe on his name.” (John 1:12)

Scripture teaches that “by grace are ye saved through faith” (Ephesians 2:8), and that faith (or belief, same word) in the substitutionary work of Christ on the cross is essential to salvation (John 3:15-18, etc.). But faith does not stop there; it grows as a Christian matures. Let us look at some of the characteristics of a growing faith in God.

One who has accepted God’s gracious offer of forgiveness and salvation, one who, by faith, has found God trustworthy, comes to trust Him and His promises in other areas as well. Paul, who had been sorely persecuted for his faith, claimed, “Nevertheless I am not ashamed: for I know whom I have believed, and am persuaded that he is able to keep that which I have committed unto him against that day” (2 Timothy 1:12). God will faithfully fulfill His promises, and we can have faith that He will.

The great heroes of faith, some of whom are listed in Hebrews 11, all had one thing in common. They dared to trust God for great things, even impossible things, and moved out on that basis. Consider Joshua: “By faith the walls of Jericho fell down, after they were compassed about seven days” (Hebrews 11:30). Joshua was confronted with an impossible problem but dared to trust God for a solution.

Then there is the mature faith that can “rest in the LORD, and wait patiently for him” (Psalm 37:7) in the face of hardship and opposition. “For evildoers shall be cut off: but those that wait upon the LORD . . . shall inherit the earth” (v. 9).

At every stage of our Christian lives, God allows us opportunities to exercise and expand our faith. Remember, “without faith it is impossible to please him” (Hebrews 11:6). JDM

I am Thy servant, give me understanding

Psalm 119:105-128

Psalm 119:105

It is a practical guide, not a book for my study only, but for my daily walk.

Psalm 119:107

Our greatest need in times of trouble is more spiritual life. Afflictions will be a gain to us if they are sanctified to our more thorough arousing and enlivening. We have a promise that it shall be so, for the psalmist says, “according unto thy word.”

Psalm 119:109

Fear often drives away holy thought, and urges men to sin; faith enables the believer to remain in quiet communion with God, even when life itself is in danger.

Psalm 119:110-115

Bad companions must be chased away, for they are great enemies to holy living. We must be plain with the ungodly, and tell them that their company will never please us till they learn to please God.

Psalm 119:116-119

God’s justice in treading down and destroying the wicked is not distasteful to a holy mind; on the contrary, we love him for being angry with evil, and relieving the world of those who are given over to it. A God without justice would be no God to just men.

Psalm 119:120

Seeing others punished, we feel a holy awe in our own souls, and fear lest we also should be deceived by sin.

Psalm 119:124

We dare not court justice, yet we do not ask for a mercy which would allow us to sin; we crave the grace which teaches us to follow after holiness.

Psalm 119:125

A good master will teach his young servant his business and bear with his ignorance; he cannot, however, give him understanding; but this our heavenly Master can perform.

Psalm 119:126

When bad living and bad doctrine cast a slur upon religion, we may importunately beg the Lord to interfere to protect the interests of his own word. Are we not living in precisely such times?

Psalm 119:127, 128

David was a decided man, he took strong ground and did not compromise, he loved right and hated wrong. That is the only safe position: there let us be found.

 

Great is their peace who love thy law,

How firm their souls abide!

Nor can a bold temptation draw

Their steady feet aside.

 

Thou hast inclined this heart of mine,

Thy statutes to fulfil;

And thus, till mortal life shall end,

Would I perform thy will.

 

Can We Afford to Die?

For here we have no continuing city, but we seek one to come. (Hebrews 13:14)

Brethren, it is a fact indeed, that we will never fully realize in our earthly life what it means to be co-heirs with Christ!

The apostles have made it quite plain that all of the eternal implications of our heavenly inheritance will not be known to us until we see Christ face to face in a future time.

I have said that only a Christian has the right and can afford to die! But if we believers were as spiritual as we ought to be, we might be looking to our “home-going” with a great deal more pleasure and anticipation than we do.

I say also that if we are true believers in the second advent of our Savior, we will be anticipating His return with yearning. Common sense, the perspective of history, the testimony of the saints, reason and the Bible—all agree with one voice that He may come before we die.

The Christian believer whose faith and hope are in Jesus Christ alone knows that he may die before the Lord comes. If he dies, he is better off, for Paul said, “It is far better that I go to be with the Lord!”

 

Light In Darkness

“For thou art my lamp, O Lord: and the Lord will lighten my darkness.” 2Sam. 22:29

Am I in the light? Then thou, O Lord, art my lamp. Take thee away, and my joy would be gone; but as long as thou art with me, I can do without the torches of time and the candles of created comfort. What a light the presence of God casts on all things! We heard of a lighthouse which could be seen for twenty miles, but our Jehovah is not only a God at hand, but far off is He seen, even in the enemy 5 country. O Lord, I am as happy as an angel when thy love fills my heart. Thou art all my desire.

Am I in the dark? Then thou, O Lord, wilt lighten my darkness. Before long things will change. Affairs may grow more and more dreary, and cloud may be piled upon cloud; but if it grow so dark that I cannot see my own hand, still I shall see the hand of the Lord. When I cannot find a light within me, or among my friends, or in the whole world, the Lord, who said “Let there be light,” and there was light, can say the same again. He will speak me into the sunshine yet. I shall not die but live. The day is already breaking. This sweet text shines like a morning star. I shall clap my hands for joy ere many hours are passed.

 

%d bloggers like this: