VIDEO The Unchanging Law of Judgment – Lukewarm “Christians”

The Unchanging Law of Judgment

With what judgment you judge, you will be judged; and with the measure you use, it will be measured back to you. —Matthew 7:2

This statement is not some haphazard theory, but it is an eternal law of God. Whatever judgment you give will be the very way you are judged. There is a difference between retaliation and retribution. Jesus said that the basis of life is retribution— “with the measure you use, it will be measured back to you.” If you have been shrewd in finding out the shortcomings of others, remember that will be exactly how you will be measured. The way you pay is the way life will pay you back. This eternal law works from God’s throne down to us (see Psalm 18:25-26).

Romans 2:1 applies it in even a more definite way by saying that the one who criticizes another is guilty of the very same thing. God looks not only at the act itself, but also at the possibility of committing it, which He sees by looking at our hearts. To begin with, we do not believe the statements of the Bible. For instance, do we really believe the statement that says we criticize in others the very things we are guilty of ourselves? The reason we see hypocrisy, deceit, and a lack of genuineness in others is that they are all in our own hearts. The greatest characteristic of a saint is humility, as evidenced by being able to say honestly and humbly, “Yes, all those, as well as other evils, would have been exhibited in me if it were not for the grace of God. Therefore, I have no right to judge.”

Jesus said, “Judge not, that you be not judged” (Matthew 7:1). He went on to say, in effect, “If you do judge, you will be judged in exactly the same way.” Who of us would dare to stand before God and say, “My God, judge me as I have judged others”? We have judged others as sinners— if God should judge us in the same way, we would be condemned to hell. Yet God judges us on the basis of the miraculous atonement by the Cross of Christ.

WISDOM FROM OSWALD CHAMBERS

The vital relationship which the Christian has to the Bible is not that he worships the letter, but that the Holy Spirit makes the words of the Bible spirit and life to him.  The Psychology of Redemption, 1066 L


Lukewarm “Christians” Judgment Day-Are You Ready?

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Our Fellowship with Jesus

 I consider everything a loss because of the surpassing worth of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord. Philippians 3:8

I’ll never forget the time I had the privilege of sitting next to Billy Graham at a dinner. I was honored but also somewhat nervous about what would be appropriate to say. I thought it would be an interesting conversation starter to ask what he loved most about his years of ministry. Then I awkwardly started to suggest possible answers. Was it knowing presidents, kings, and queens? Or preaching the gospel to millions of people around the world?

Before I had finished offering suggestions, Rev. Graham stopped me. Without hesitation he said, “It has been my fellowship with Jesus. To sense His presence, to glean His wisdom, to have Him guide and direct me—that has been my greatest joy.” I was instantly convicted and challenged. Convicted because I’m not sure that his answer would have been my answer, and challenged because I wanted it to be.

That’s what Paul had in mind when he counted his greatest achievements to be of no worth compared to the “surpassing worth of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord” (Philippians 3:8). Think of how rich life would be if Jesus and our fellowship with Him was our highest pursuit.

Lord, forgive me for chasing after things that matter far less than my fellowship with You. Thank You that You stand ready to enrich my life with Your presence and power.

To remain faithful where God has placed you, give Christ first place in your heart.

By Joe Stowell 

INSIGHT

The apostle Paul’s passion to know Christ and to make Him known to others should guide our lives as well. In Philippians 3:1–14, we see how growing in our knowledge of Christ is mixed with both joy and pain: “I want to know Christ—yes, to know the power of his resurrection and participation in his sufferings” (v. 10). Jesus told us, “In this world you will have trouble. But take heart! I have overcome the world” (John 16:33). As we grow in our relationship with Christ we can expect both joy and suffering.

How has both joy and suffering deepened your fellowship with Christ?

Dennis Fisher

The Greatness of Our God

Isaiah 40:12-26

When you think of God, what comes to mind? Often, people view Him in the way that best fits their particular need or situation. For example, a person who struggles with guilt might focus on the Lord’s forgiveness or holiness. And someone with a thirst for justice might dwell on the Almighty’s righteousness.

The truth is, His character encompasses far more than we could ever comprehend or even try to explain. I would never attempt to summarize such an awesome God in this devotion, but it’s important to look at Scripture in order to gain an accurate picture of the One we worship.

Today we will focus on one attribute: the Lord’s greatness. The passage from Isaiah 40 tells us that God is greater than creation (Isa. 40:12), for it was by His hands that everything we see came into being. He is higher than the nations or any idol fashioned by the finest craftsman (Isa. 40:17-20). In fact, He is above the world and all mankind (Isa. 40:22-23), surpassing even the heavens and galaxies.

Our Father’s thoughts and ways are far grander than our own (Isa. 55:9)—and lofty compared with what we can understand. Psalm 93:1 states, “The Lord reigns, He is clothed with majesty; the Lord has clothed and girded Himself with strength.”

Consider the awesome God we serve. He truly is worthy of our praise. As we grasp even a fraction of His greatness, our response should be one of humble worship. After all, who are we that a God like this would desire our friendship—so much so that He sent His Son to die for our sins?

In just a Moment

“Behold, I shew you a mystery; We shall not all sleep, but we shall all be changed, In a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trump: for the trumpet shall sound, and the dead shall be raised incorruptible, and we shall be changed.” (1 Corinthians 15:51-52)

This is one of the greatest promises in the Bible, assuring us that “we” (i.e., all believers, whether dead or living when Christ returns) shall suddenly be changed, with our dead or dying bodies instantly transformed into incorruptible, immortal bodies, which can never die again.

This great change, when it finally occurs, will take place “in a moment.” The Greek here is en atomo, “in an atom of time.” This word, implying the smallest entity conceivable by the Greeks, is used only this one time in the New Testament. It is further described by “the twinkling of an eye,” where “twinkling” is the Greek rhipe, also used only this once. Evidently there is nothing else in this present world comparable in rapidity to this miraculous change that will be called forth when “the Lord himself shall descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice of the archangel, and with the trump of God” (1 Thessalonians 4:16).

The great shout (probably uttered by Christ Himself as at the tomb of Lazarus) will instantly create new bodies for both dead and living believers. “The dead in Christ shall rise first: Then we which are alive” (1 Thessalonians 4:16-17).

Our new bodies will be like Christ’s resurrection body. He “shall change our vile body, that it may be fashioned like unto his glorious body, according to the working whereby he is able even to subdue all things unto himself” (Philippians 3:21).

Christ is able thus to create new bodies for us in a moment, just as when He created all things in the beginning: “He spake, and it was done” (Psalm 33:9). HMM

Ye shall indeed drink of the cup that I drink of

Mark 10:32-45

Mark 10:32-34

Like a brave captain the Lord led the way, and like brave followers his disciples, despite their fears, kept close to their leader. It is well if, when we experience any alarm, we have faith enough still to press forward where Jesus points out the road.

Mark 10:32-34

The Lord was very explicit, and gave more of the details of his sufferings and death than he had ever mentioned before. He was very familiar with his friends, and told them all things; he was very honest with them, and plainly warned them of the evils which would happen to him, lest they should follow him with mistaken expectations. Jesus familiarised his disciples with his death before it happened, and much more would he now have it before our minds, since its bitterness is past, and the fruits of it are surpassingly precious.

Mark 10:36

He would not grant them a request thus put to him in the dark. He wisely allowed them to go on with their suit, that, upon further consideration, they might be made ashamed of it.

Mark 10:37

When he should take his kingdom, they desired to be the first peers in his realm. Not, perhaps, because they wished to be above their brethren, but because they loved him so well that they desired to be very near and dear to him, and to enjoy the same distinguished position which he had in some measure given to them already, when with Peter they had formed a favoured trio upon the mount of transfiguration.

Mark 10:38-40

Our ignorance of ten shows itself in our prayers. We ask for a crown when we ought to pray for grace to bear our cross.

Mark 10:41

This was very natural, but it did not last long. Partly through the influence of our Lord’s words, and partly through the humble and loving conduct of these two gracious brethren, all jealousy subsided, and we do not detect even a trace of it in the after history of the apostles.

Mark 10:42-44

shall be your minister or servant

In the church of God, he is greatest who renders most service, and is willing to take the lowest place for the good of the rest. Those who are really eminent have to work harder and endure far more reproach than their less honoured brethren, and so it should be, since thus it was with our Lord.

Mark 10:45

He gave up all and took the lowest service for our sakes; thus teaching his followers not to look for honour or service from their fellow Christians, but to stand ready to be the servants of all. Lord, teach us to serve, and save us from the pride which would expect others to pay us homage.

 

Our Lord Is Sovereign

The most High dwelleth not in temples made with hands… Heaven is my throne, and earth is my footstool. (Acts 7:48-49)

How can you be a Christian and not be aware of the sovereignty of the God who has loved us to the death?

To be sovereign, God must be the absolute, infinite, unqualified ruler in all realms in heaven and earth and sea. To be Lord over all the creation, He must be omnipotent. He must be omniscient. He must be omnipresent.

With all that is within me, I believe that the crucified and risen and glorified Savior, Jesus Christ, is the sovereign Lord. He takes no orders from anyone. He has no counselors and no advisers. He has no secretary to the throne. He knows in the one effortless act all that can be known and He has already lived out our tomorrows and holds the world in the palm of His hand.

That is the Lord I serve! I gladly own that I am His; glory to God! The Christ we know and serve is infinitely beyond all men and all angels and all archangels; above all principalities and powers and dominions, visible and invisible—for He is the origin of them all!

 

He With Us; We With Him

“The fear of the Lord prolongeth days: but the years of the wicked shall be shortened.” Prov. 10:27

There is no doubt about it. The fear of the Lord leads to virtuous habits, and these prevent that waste of life which comes of sin and vice. The holy rest which springs out of faith in the Lord Jesus also greatly helps a man when he is ill. Every physician rejoices to have a patient whose mind is fully at ease. Worry kills, but confidence in God is like healing medicine.

We have therefore all the arrangements for long life, and if it be really for our good, we shall see a good old age, and come to our graves as shocks of corn in their season. Let us not be overcome with sudden expectation of death the moment we have a finger-ache, but let us rather expect that we may have to work on through a considerable length of days.

And what if we should soon be called to the higher sphere? Certainly there would be nothing to deplore in such a summons, but everything to rejoice in. Living or dying we are the Lord’s. If we live, Jesus will be with us; if we die, we shall be with Jesus.

The truest lengthening of life is to live while we live, wasting no time, but using every hour for the highest ends. So be it this day.

 

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