VIDEO The Greatest Artist Of All Time

Jun 27, 2013

We are all God’s poetry. I hope this poem encourages you all to see that we can all be creative since we are all created by the Creator. Since we are made in God’s image we also have the capacity to create works of art, music, culture, writing, etc. and use it to point back to Him!

PS my friend Jenny who sang at the end released a full studio version of the song! Can check it out here: http://jennysnipstead.bandcamp.com!

The Greatest Artist Of All Time-Jefferson Bethke

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As Bad as the Grave

Jealousy as cruel as the grave; its flames are flames of fire, a most vehement flame. Song of Solomon 8:6

It seems nothing could be crueler than the grave, but according to Song of Solomon there’s one thing as bad—jealousy. That’s what caused Lucifer to rebel against God. It’s what caused Cain to kill Abel, and Jacob’s sons to sell their brother Joseph into slavery. It’s why King Saul devoted his life to killing David. According to Mark 15:10, the Jewish leaders handed Jesus over to Pilate because of envy and jealousy.

That means it’s no small thing to feel pangs of jealousy toward another.

If someone receives a higher grade, makes a larger salary, wins a race, achieves a victory, or experiences more prosperity in some way, are you jealous? Yes, we’re all tempted to feel jealous, because the tree of envy grows from the soil of pride. But love is God’s supernatural attitude that allows us to rejoice in the success of others. The Bible says, “Love suffers long and is kind; love does not envy” (1 Corinthians 13:4).

If you feel jealous toward another, that’s natural. Ask God for His supernatural attitude of love. It can make all the difference.

The humble man feels no jealousy or envy. He can praise God when others are preferred and blessed before him.… He has received the spirit of Jesus, who pleased not Himself, and who sought not His own honor. Andrew Murray

God Is Our Protector

Psalm 121:1-3

In Psalm 121, David describes the safety that he found in the Lord. Over the next two days, let’s look closely at several verses to better understand our security.

“I will lift up my eyes to the mountains; from where shall my help come? My help comes from the Lord, who made heaven and earth” (Ps. 121:1-2). When this was written, robbers dwelled in the mountains, waiting for innocent travelers to become their unsuspecting victims. Needless to say, journeying through these hilly roads must have caused anxiety. David’s work as a shepherd took him into dangerous areas, where not only thieves but also wild animals posed a threat.

Our lives can be like mountainous territory. Do you look into the future and wonder what dangers lurk? The Lord is our helper; He is the only one able to protect us. Friends and relatives can offer limited assistance, but God knows everything and has all the power necessary to rescue us.

“He will not allow your foot to slip” (Ps. 121:3). God has provided everything we need in order to avoid sin. The Holy Spirit directs and empowers us; the Word lights our path so we do not slip. Yet at times, we choose to sin. Almighty God could stop us from disobeying, but He doesn’t interfere with our free will. Instead, He upholds us, enabling us to walk in His way.

These opening verses of the psalm focus on the Lord’s ability to protect us in treacherous times. Whether trouble originates with others, external circumstances, or our own sin, we can find ourselves in danger and afraid. Thankfully, we have a loving God who leads us to safety.

Doing God’s Pleasure

“Work out your own salvation with fear and trembling. For it is God which worketh in you both to will and to do of his good pleasure.” (Philippians 2:12-13)

In this passage with an unusual play on words, we are told to give our salvation a “workout.” The Greek word is katergazomai, an interesting compound word that means to “perform.” When we are told that God is working in us, the Greek word is energeô, which is the “energy” to do work.

Paul puts it this way: “Now unto him that is able to do exceeding abundantly above all that we ask or think, according to the power that worketh [energeô] in us” (Ephesians 3:20). This “energizing” is an internal and spiritual resource, demonstrated most poignantly by “the exceeding greatness of his power to us-ward who believe, according to the working [energeô] of his mighty power, Which he wrought in Christ, when he raised him from the dead” (Ephesians 1:19-20). Since the energy to produce comes from the same Creator who saved us by grace, He has every right to expect us to “will and to do of his good pleasure.”

Peter taught us that God provided “all things that pertain unto life and godliness” (2 Peter 1:3). The Thessalonican church was told that “the word of God . . . effectually worketh also in you that believe” (1 Thessalonians 2:13). And of course, “all scripture . . . is profitable. . . . That the man of God may be perfect, throughly furnished unto all good works” (2 Timothy 3:16-17).

Our objective, having been supernaturally supplied by the One who saved us, is to “walk worthy of the Lord unto all pleasing, being fruitful in every good work, and increasing in the knowledge of God; Strengthened with all might, according to his glorious power, unto all patience and longsuffering with joyfulness” (Colossians 1:10-11). HMM III

Normal Christians

Whom having not seen, ye love; in whom, though now ye see him not, yet believing, ye rejoice with joy unspeakable and full of glory. —1 Peter 1:8

Is the Lord Jesus Christ your most precious treasure in this world? If so, you can count yourself among normal Christians.

Is the moral beauty which is found only in Jesus Christ constantly drawing you to praise and worship? If so you are indeed among those whom God’s Word identifies as normal, believing, practicing Christians.

But I can almost anticipate an objection. If someone is that delighted and that occupied with the person of Jesus Christ, is he or she not an extremist rather than a normal Christian?

Have professing Christians really come to that time in their humanistic and secularistic leanings that they can sincerely deny that loving Jesus Christ with all their heart and soul and strength is normal Christianity? We must not be reading and studying the same Bible!

How can anyone profess to be a follower and a disciple of Jesus Christ and not be overwhelmed by His attributes? These divine attributes attest that He is indeed Lord of all, completely worthy of our worship and praise.

Lord, I pray that You would restore in Your Church a belief that those who love You with all their heart, soul and mind are normal, and worthy of imitation. May we be overwhelmed by Your attributes. Amen.

Eternity in Your Heart?

The high and lofty One that inhabiteth eternity… with him also that is of a contrite and humble spirit. (Isaiah 57:15)

The only reason that men and women can be saved is the fact that God has put eternity in our hearts!

Man is fallen—yes! Man is lost, a sinner and needs to be born again—yes!

But God made man in His own image and He keeps the longing after eternity and a desire after everlasting life there within the hearts of men.

What, then, is the matter with man? Like the lion in the cage, he paces back and forth and roars to the heavens before he dies.

I think this is the truth—we are disturbed because God has put everlastingness in our hearts. He has put a longing for immortality in our beings, something that demands God and heaven. Yet, we are too blind and sinful to find Him or even to look for Him!

As Christian witnesses, we must be faithful and timely in our preaching and teaching. There is a note of warning in this—telling men and women why they are lost and that if they will not repent they will certainly perish!

No care but all prayer

Be careful for nothing; but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known unto God. And the peace of God, which passeth all understanding, shall keep your hearts and minds through Christ Jesus.—Phil. 4:6, 7.

No care but all prayer. No anxiety, but much joyful communion with God. Carry your desires to the Lord of your life, the guardian of your soul. Go to Him with two portions of prayer, and one of fragrant praise. Do not pray doubtfully, but thankfully. Consider that you have your petitions, and, therefore, thank God for His Grace.